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History, References, and Research => History and Tall Tales => Topic started by: BanzaiCat on March 20, 2019, 05:00:41 PM

Title: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on March 20, 2019, 05:00:41 PM
March 20

1413 - Henry IV of England is succeeded by his son Bob48 Henry V.

1739 - In India, Nadir Shah of Persia occupies Delhi and takes possession of the Peacock throne.

1760 - The Great Fire of Boston destroys 349 buildings.

1792 - In Paris, the Legislative Assembly approves the use of the guillotine.

1815 - Napoleon Bonaparte enters Paris and begins his 100-day rule.

1841 - Edgar Allan Poe's The Murders in the Rue Morgue, considered the first detective story, is published.

1852 - Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin is published.

1906 - Army officers in Russia mutiny at Sevastopol.

1915 - The French call off the Champagne offensive on the Western Front.

1918 - The Bolsheviks of the Soviet Union ask for American aid to rebuild their army.

1922 - President Warren G. Harding orders U.S. troops back from the Rhineland.

1932 - The German dirigible, Graf Zepplin, makes the first flight to South America on a regular schedule.

1939 - President Franklin D. Roosevelt names William O. Douglas to the Supreme Court.

1940 - The British Royal Air Force conducts an all-night air raid on the Nazi airbase at Sylt, Germany.

1943 - The Allies attack Field Marshall Erwin Rommel's forces on the Mareth Line in North Africa.

1965 - President Lyndon B. Johnson orders 4,000 troops to protect the Selma-Montgomery civil rights marchers.

1969 - Senator Edward Kennedy calls on the United States to close all bases in Taiwan.

1976 - Patty Hearst is convicted of armed robbery.

1982 - U.S. scientists return from Antarctica with the first land mammal fossils found there.

1987 - The United States approves AZT, a drug that is proven to slow the progression of AIDS.

Born on March 20

43 - Ovid, Roman poet.

1811 - Napoleon II, son of Napoleon Bonaparte, Duke of Reichstadt.

1828 - Henrik Ibsen, Norwegian dramatist (Peer Gynt, Hedda Gabler).

1904 - B.F. Skinner, American psychologist.

1917 - Dame Vera Lynn , British singer.

1922 - Raymond Walter Goulding, Radio comedian of Bob and Ray fame.

1925 - John Ehrlichman, White House adviser to President Nixon.

1928 - Fred Rogers, television performer (Mr. Roger's Neighborhood).
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on March 20, 2019, 05:10:09 PM

Bob XLVIII was a terrible king.

Vera Lynn is 102 years old today. :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on March 20, 2019, 07:32:26 PM
March 20

1413 - Henry IV of England is succeeded by his son Bob48 Henry V.

1739 - In India, Nadir Shah of Persia occupies Delhi and takes possession of the Peacock throne.

1760 - The Great Fire of Boston destroys 349 buildings.

1792 - In Paris, the Legislative Assembly approves the use of the guillotine.

1815 - Napoleon Bonaparte enters Paris and begins his 100-day rule.

1841 - Edgar Allan Poe's The Murders in the Rue Morgue, considered the first detective story, is published.

1852 - Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin is published.

1906 - Army officers in Russia mutiny at Sevastopol.

1915 - The French call off the Champagne offensive on the Western Front.

1918 - The Bolsheviks of the Soviet Union ask for American aid to rebuild their army.

1922 - President Warren G. Harding orders U.S. troops back from the Rhineland.

1932 - The German dirigible, Graf Zepplin, makes the first flight to South America on a regular schedule.

1939 - President Franklin D. Roosevelt names William O. Douglas to the Supreme Court.

1940 - The British Royal Air Force conducts an all-night air raid on the Nazi airbase at Sylt, Germany.

1943 - The Allies attack Field Marshall Erwin Rommel's forces on the Mareth Line in North Africa.

1965 - President Lyndon B. Johnson orders 4,000 troops to protect the Selma-Montgomery civil rights marchers.

1969 - Senator Edward Kennedy calls on the United States to close all bases in Taiwan.

1976 - Patty Hearst is convicted of armed robbery.

1982 - U.S. scientists return from Antarctica with the first land mammal fossils found there.

1987 - The United States approves AZT, a drug that is proven to slow the progression of AIDS.

Born on March 20

43 - Ovid, Roman poet.

1811 - Napoleon II, son of Napoleon Bonaparte, Duke of Reichstadt.

1828 - Henrik Ibsen, Norwegian dramatist (Peer Gynt, Hedda Gabler).

1904 - B.F. Skinner, American psychologist.

1917 - Dame Vera Lynn , British singer.

1922 - Raymond Walter Goulding, Radio comedian of Bob and Ray fame.

1925 - John Ehrlichman, White House adviser to President Nixon.

1928 - Fred Rogers, television performer (Mr. Roger's Neighborhood).

1971 - Mirth, drunk podcaster

updated
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: trailrunner on March 20, 2019, 09:26:22 PM
Born on March 20


1971 - Mirth, drunk podcaster




  :party:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on March 20, 2019, 11:11:47 PM
Is that really count as history or just an everyday thing?
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on March 21, 2019, 06:42:09 PM
March 21

630 - Heraclius restores the True Cross, which he has recaptured from the Persians.

1556 - Thomas Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury, is burned at the stake at Oxford after retracting the last of seven recantations that same day.

1617 - Pocahontas (Rebecca Rolfe) dies of either small pox or pneumonia while in England with her husband, John Rolfe.

1788 - Almost the entire city of New Orleans, Louisiana, is destroyed by fire.

1806 - Lewis and Clark begin their trip home after an 8,000 mile trek of the Mississippi basin and the Pacific Coast.

1851 - Emperor Tu Duc orders that Christian priests are to put to death.

1858 - British forces in India lift the siege of Lucknow, ending the Indian Mutiny.

1865 - The Battle of Bentonville, N.C. ends, marking the last Confederate attempt to stop Union General William Sherman.

1906 - Ohio passes a law that prohibits hazing by fraternities.

1908 - Frenchman Henri Farman carries a passenger in a bi-plane for the first time.

1910 - The U.S. Senate grants ex-President Teddy Roosevelt an annual pension of $10,000.

1918 - The Germans launch the 'Michael' offensive, better remembered as the First Battle of the Somme.

1928 - President Calvin Coolidge presents the Congressional Medal of Honor to Charles Lindbergh, a captain in the US Army Air Corps Reserve, for making the first solo trans-Atlantic flight. On June 11, 1927, Lindbergh had received the first Distinguished Flying Cross ever awarded.

1939 - Singer Kate Smith records "God Bless America" for Victor Records.

1941 - The last Italian post in East Libya, North Africa, falls to the British.

1951 - Secretary of Defense George C. Marshall reports that the U.S. military has doubled to 2.9 million since the start of the Korean War.

1963 - Alcatraz Island, the federal penitentiary in San Francisco Bay, California, closes.

1965 - The United States launches Ranger 9, last in a series of unmanned lunar explorations.

1971 - Two U.S. platoons in Vietnam refuse their orders to advance.

1975 - As North Vietnamese forces advance, Hue and other northern towns in South Vietnam are evacuated.

1980 - President Jimmy Carter announces to the U.S. Olympic Team that they will not participate in the 1980 Summer Games in Moscow as a boycott against Soviet intervention in Afghanistan.

1984 - A Soviet submarine crashes into the USS Kitty Hawk off the coast of Japan.

Born on March 21

1685 - Johann Sebastian Bach, German composer.

1806 - Benito Juarez, President of Mexico.

1869 - Florenz Ziegfeld, producer, creator of Ziegfeld Follies.

1869 - Albert Kahn, architect who originated modern factory design.

1885 - Raoul Lufbery, French-born American fighter pilot of World War I.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on March 22, 2019, 10:52:33 AM
Exxon Valdez spill was 30 years ago this weekend


https://twitter.com/AP_Images/status/1109078868743344129
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on March 22, 2019, 11:11:16 AM
Which gave us St Joe from Waterworld....
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on March 22, 2019, 11:58:36 AM
And Kevin Costner with gills.  ???
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on March 25, 2019, 09:12:38 AM
March 25

708 - Constantine begins his reign as Catholic Pope.

1634 - Lord Baltimore founds the Catholic colony of Maryland.

1655 - Puritans jail Governor Stone after a military victory over Catholic forces in the colony of Maryland.

1668 - The first horse race in America takes place.

1776 - The Continental Congress authorizes a medal for General George Washington.

1807 - British Parliament abolishes the slave trade.

1813 - The frigate USS Essex flies the first U.S. flag in battle in the Pacific.

1865 - Confederate forces capture Fort Stedman, during the siege of Petersburg, Va.

1879 - Japan invades the kingdom of Liuqiu (Ryukyu) Islands, formerly a vassal of China.

1905 - Rebel battle flags that were captured during the American Civil War are returned to the South.

1911 - A fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist Company, a sweatshop in New York City, claims the lives of 146 workers.

1915 - The first submarine disaster occurs when a U.S. F-4 sinks off the Hawaiian coast.

1919 - The Paris Peace Commission adopts a plan to protect nations from the influx of foreign labor.

1931 - Fifty people are killed in riots that break out in India. Mahatma Gandhi was one of many people assaulted.

1940 - The United States agrees to give Britain and France access to all American warplanes.

1941 - Yugoslavia joins the Axis powers.

1953 - The USS Missouri fires on targets at Kojo, North Korea, the last time her guns fire until the Persian Gulf War of 1992.

1954 - RCA manufactures its first color TV set and begins mass production.

1957 - The European Common Market Treaty is signed in Rome. The goal is to create a common market for all products--especially coal and steel.

1965 - Martin Luther King Jr. leads a group of 25,000 to the state capital in Montgomery, Ala.

1969 - John Lennon and Yoko Ono stage a bed-in for peace in Amsterdam.

1970 - The Concorde makes its first supersonic flight.

1975 - Hue is lost and Da Nang is endangered by North Vietnamese forces. The United States orders a refugee airlift to remove those in danger.

1981 - The U.S. Embassy in San Salvador is damaged when gunmen attack, firing rocket propelled grenades and machine guns.

1986 - President Ronald Reagan orders emergency aid for the Honduran army. U.S. helicopters take Honduran troops to the Nicaraguan border.

Born Today

1767 - Joachim Murat, Napoleon's brother-in-law who became King of Naples in 1808.

1797 - John Winebrenner, U.S. clergyman who founded the Church of God.

1839 - William Bell Wait, educator of the blind.

1867 - Gutzon Borglum, sculptor of Mount Rushmore.

1868 - Arturo Toscanini, Italian conductor.

1906 - Alan John Percivale Taylor, English historian.

1908 - David Lean, British film director (Bridge on the River Kwai, Lawrence of Arabia).

1925 - (Mary) Flannery O'Connor, novelist and short story writer.

1934 - Gloria Steinem, political activist, editor.

1942 - Aretha Franklin, American singer, the "Queen of Soul."
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Barthheart on March 25, 2019, 12:13:49 PM
Born today

1965 - Vance Strickland, engineer, creator of black hole machine that devoured the earth in 2020
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on March 25, 2019, 12:14:58 PM
Happy Birthday you earth destroying black hole creating thing you!  :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on March 25, 2019, 12:29:28 PM
Born today

1965 - Vance Strickland, engineer, creator of black hole machine that devoured the earth in 2020


 :party: :party: :party: :party: :party:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on March 25, 2019, 12:35:53 PM
Happy Birthday you earth destroying black hole creating thing you!  :bigthumb:

+100  :bigthumb: :groovy: :party:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on March 25, 2019, 08:01:59 PM
Happy birthday ya nutty Canuck! :)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on March 25, 2019, 08:15:16 PM
Happy Burpday man!
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on March 26, 2019, 07:43:35 AM
https://twitter.com/MilHistNow/status/1110506733649252352
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on March 26, 2019, 10:14:28 AM
 :applause: :applause: :applause:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on March 26, 2019, 10:21:54 AM
The Iwo Jima battle fascinates me. Especially how B-29 operations were being carried out from its airfields while the island was still being cleared.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on March 26, 2019, 10:25:52 AM
The Iwo Jima battle fascinates me. Especially how B-29 operations were being carried out from its airfields while the island was still being cleared.

Yes, I agree with you, it is a fascinating battle, and one of the few pacific battles that I have read much about; the other being Okinawa, the naval aspect of which is incredible in term of the way logistics were handled - the USN did an outstanding job.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on March 26, 2019, 10:52:17 AM
It is fascinating, but not really something I'd want to game.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on March 26, 2019, 11:58:55 AM
https://twitter.com/RetroNewsNow/status/1110570906269769730
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on March 26, 2019, 12:11:17 PM
https://twitter.com/airandspace/status/1110574390121586688
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on March 26, 2019, 01:06:53 PM
https://twitter.com/RetroNewsNow/status/1110570906269769730 (https://twitter.com/RetroNewsNow/status/1110570906269769730)


and it definitively brought lasting peace to the most troubled spot in the world
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on March 26, 2019, 01:10:55 PM
No one's done better in the region since.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on March 26, 2019, 01:53:42 PM
https://twitter.com/RetroNewsNow/status/1110600106666086401
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on April 01, 2019, 10:57:36 AM
https://twitter.com/RetroNewsNow/status/1112730196866711552
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on April 01, 2019, 07:54:35 PM
If I could buy a Gremlin in good condition for $1879 now I'd do it in a heartbeat. Same goes for an AMC Pacer, Mustang 2, Datsun B210 (hatchback or Honeybee), and especially any Pinto with that Ford of Germany V-6. Those may have been crappy little cars but they got my friends and me around back when we were teens and early 20-somethings. Toyotas and Subarus were there too but they were a step up.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on April 01, 2019, 07:56:40 PM
What about a Yugo?  :whistle:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: trailrunner on April 01, 2019, 08:34:56 PM
If I could buy a Gremlin in good condition for $1879 now I'd do it in a heartbeat. Same goes for an AMC Pacer, Mustang 2, Datsun B210 (hatchback or Honeybee), and especially any Pinto with that Ford of Germany V-6. Those may have been crappy little cars but they got my friends and me around back when we were teens and early 20-somethings. Toyotas and Subarus were there too but they were a step up.

Those cars bring back memories.  I took driver's education in a Pinto.  My best friend in HS had a Datsun B210 from the mid-70s.  I dated a girl who had a Mustang 2.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on April 01, 2019, 10:50:49 PM
I had a '77 Pinto with a V-6 in it. Damn, it was pretty and would run like a gazelle but with all that engine in so little a space, you had to take the whole engine out just to change the damn spark plugs. I spent a fortune keeping that thing running.  :thumbdown:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on April 14, 2019, 07:05:46 AM
https://twitter.com/probingthepast/status/1117382816776454144
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on April 14, 2019, 09:02:18 AM
What about a Yugo?  :whistle:


That was over 10 years later.  Those didn't hit the US until the mid-80s when I was over in Germany
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on April 14, 2019, 03:11:39 PM
To be fair, the Titanic struck the iceberg not the other way around. Though I did hear the iceberg started it.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on April 18, 2019, 11:54:36 AM
https://twitter.com/airandspace/status/1118905467772731392
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on April 22, 2019, 12:06:33 PM
https://twitter.com/MilHistNow/status/1120357929574703105
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on April 24, 2019, 11:45:40 AM
https://twitter.com/RetroNewsNow/status/1121077371174572038
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on April 24, 2019, 12:30:19 PM
https://twitter.com/RetroNewsNow/status/1121077371174572038

The next day it was discovered that it needed a contact lens to see.  ;D
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on April 24, 2019, 02:29:10 PM
Right, that's what pissed off Thanos to begin with, us spying on him.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on April 25, 2019, 08:55:08 AM
https://twitter.com/pptsapper/status/1121392519290544130

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on April 26, 2019, 02:37:49 PM
https://twitter.com/RetroNewsNow/status/1121845046049955841
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on April 26, 2019, 07:43:38 PM
For the next 6 months anytime someone had a red gummy bear we called them Chernobyl bears
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on May 01, 2019, 11:04:08 AM
https://twitter.com/barefootboomer/status/1123602988097003521
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on May 02, 2019, 08:05:41 AM
https://twitter.com/MilHistNow/status/1123916344674652160
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on May 02, 2019, 08:23:17 AM
^Wow, some of the comments to that tweet...
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on May 02, 2019, 11:48:49 AM
That IS pretty sad. I just read a new biography of Jackson and he clearly was NOT fighting to preserve slavery nor was he a traitor. He also wasn't killed by the bullet that hit him. As he was being carried off the field on a stretcher, he was dropped and apparently injured his ribs and possibly his lungs too. This only became apparent later when he was convalescing and developed pneumonia and possibly blood clots in his lungs. If that was the case, he could not have survived the injury despite what happened to his left arm.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on May 02, 2019, 07:33:26 PM
16 years ago today, President Bush declared "mission accomplished"

https://www.wcvb.com/article/today-in-history-may-1-george-w-bush-announces-major-combat-ended-in-iraq/27332044
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on May 06, 2019, 12:11:07 PM
https://twitter.com/RetroNewsNow/status/1125428448367919104
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on May 06, 2019, 12:21:43 PM
^And I still haven't seen it.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on May 06, 2019, 12:24:30 PM
watched it a million times as a kid
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on May 06, 2019, 02:28:41 PM
https://twitter.com/MissedinHistory/status/1125414933510983682
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on May 07, 2019, 09:12:44 AM
https://twitter.com/MilHistNow/status/1125748461377347584
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on May 07, 2019, 07:43:00 PM
watched it a million times as a kid

ALL FOR SALE ALL FOR SALE*

*me during the Legion Wargames sale
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on May 07, 2019, 07:44:04 PM
watched it a million times as a kid

ALL FOR SALE ALL FOR SALE*

*me during the Legion Wargames sale

 :ROFL:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on May 07, 2019, 07:45:49 PM
It's funny, that's the ONLY line from Doctor Detroit I can remember. But I can't find it in YouTube anywhere.

That and Dan Akroyd power walking in the beginning. I saw it plenty of times myself but don't remember any of the movie...I doubt it's on Netflix nor Prime though.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on May 07, 2019, 07:46:44 PM
I'm gonna find it and buy it.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on May 07, 2019, 07:49:56 PM
LOL

$23 for a Blu-Ray

$6 for a DVD ;D

https://www.amazon.com/Doctor-Detroit-Blu-ray-Dan-Aykroyd/dp/B078X9BG82/ref=sr_1_2?keywords=doctor+detroit&qid=1557272949&s=gateway&sr=8-2
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on May 22, 2019, 01:13:09 PM
https://twitter.com/MilHistNow/status/1131245915753373696
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on May 22, 2019, 03:50:34 PM
"Routed" Is a very strong word. I thought Napoleon was actually winning this fight but decided to withdraw back over the Danube to regroup for another try in a month.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on June 04, 2019, 09:28:47 AM
https://twitter.com/BeschlossDC/status/1135867914731630593
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on June 04, 2019, 11:30:53 AM
I actually thought it was the 5th of June Rome was liberated. But the 4th will work.  :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on June 04, 2019, 08:19:59 PM
https://twitter.com/BeschlossDC/status/1135867914731630593

I actually thought it was the 5th of June Rome was liberated. But the 4th will work.  :bigthumb:

Oh to be a fly on the wall at OKW:

Monday 6/5/44

"Look! Ze Allies, zey haf liberated Rome!"
"Oh Sheisse!"

Tuesday 6/6/44

'Look! Ze Allies, zey haf landed in France!"
"Oh Sheisse!"

Talk about the start of a lousy week...
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on June 04, 2019, 11:23:19 PM
Meanwhile at Stavka, "Damn! We haven't even gotten to Minsk yet".  :steamed:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on June 05, 2019, 11:44:45 AM
Short thread, worth clicking thru

https://twitter.com/pptsapper/status/1136280545711874053
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on June 05, 2019, 03:46:03 PM
https://twitter.com/RetroNewsNow/status/1136358309185949697
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on June 06, 2019, 08:13:04 AM
https://twitter.com/SkyNews/status/1136152978203783168
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on June 06, 2019, 04:06:07 PM
Brave men all.  :applause:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on June 07, 2019, 10:50:25 AM
that's just my eyes sweating


https://twitter.com/DonutOperator/status/1136676068830658560
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on June 07, 2019, 11:02:16 PM
that's just my eyes sweating


https://twitter.com/DonutOperator/status/1136676068830658560

I kept it together until the "we were all boys" bit at the end... 

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on June 18, 2019, 10:27:13 AM
https://twitter.com/MilHistNow/status/1140988831392587777
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on June 18, 2019, 02:32:49 PM
That Blucher! He knew how to make an entrance.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on June 18, 2019, 04:45:21 PM
https://twitter.com/RetroNewsNow/status/1141083983905796096
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on June 18, 2019, 07:44:01 PM
https://twitter.com/RetroNewsNow/status/1141083983905796096

That MiG-31 looked way cooler than the real one.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on June 18, 2019, 11:33:11 PM
LOVED that movie when I saw it in the theater so much I completely forgot about going for a cheap 'feel' of my date.  :D
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on June 19, 2019, 11:11:39 AM
LOVED that movie when I saw it in the theater so much I completely forgot about going for a cheap 'feel' of my date.  :D


I'm sure your wife was relieved  :whistle:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on June 19, 2019, 07:46:22 PM
She sure was because it wasn't her. Oh, wait.... forget I just said that.  :-X
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on June 19, 2019, 09:00:46 PM
This is a fun read

https://twitter.com/CivilWarHumor/status/1141466536634224640
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on June 25, 2019, 12:31:52 PM
https://twitter.com/Battlefields/status/1143557141866958848
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on June 25, 2019, 11:22:45 PM
Or as the Sioux used to call him, "Yellow Hair Standing in Yellow Puddle Around Boots". I think it was kind of an Indian inside joke.  :hehe:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on July 01, 2019, 09:22:53 AM
https://twitter.com/landofthe80/status/1145681222468800512
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on July 01, 2019, 11:31:40 AM
Those guys should've NEVER gotten rid of all those ghosts, they'd still have jobs today. You'd think it's NYC and they could transition to giant NY Sewer Rats but no, I guess not. Thanks for the funny memories A Team.  :applause:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on July 03, 2019, 07:38:37 AM
https://twitter.com/MilHistNow/status/1146381858101506049
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on July 06, 2019, 12:03:19 PM
https://twitter.com/airandspace/status/1147535832263331840
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on July 06, 2019, 04:39:37 PM
 :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on July 06, 2019, 11:06:14 PM
I was there. She was 10 min. late.  :tickedoff:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on July 16, 2019, 02:00:35 PM
This is awesome

https://apolloinrealtime.org/11/
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on July 16, 2019, 03:26:05 PM
This is awesome

https://apolloinrealtime.org/11/ (https://apolloinrealtime.org/11/)

just found out today that Andy Martin's dad worked on Apollo 11 and was in the control room while it was in the air
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on July 16, 2019, 11:19:23 PM
You guys MUST have your dates wrong. I watched the moon landing on TV and it cannot have been 50 years ago I sat there in my Popeye the Sailorman jamies, in my Davy Crockett tent, drinking my Ovaltine chocolate milk while eating a box of Animal Crackers and drawing it all on Etch-A-Sketch. Can it?  :worried:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on July 17, 2019, 08:37:55 AM
it cannot have been 50 years ago


My parents hadn't met yet.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on July 17, 2019, 11:42:02 AM
Bet they were thinking about you though.  :whistle:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on July 17, 2019, 06:22:05 PM
I was about 5 years old. I barely remember watching it on a small black&white TV in the first home my parents bought (not rented) after we emigrated to the US from the Netherlands.

My dad actually filmed us watching the landing in the dining room and we had that home movie for many years, watching it at the holidays along with the rest of our family celluloid memories.

I have no idea where that film ended up. It seems to have disappeared somewhere in the fogs of the 80's.  :(
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on July 18, 2019, 02:16:29 AM
it cannot have been 50 years ago


My parents hadn't met yet.

Neither had mine (they were in college). 

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on July 22, 2019, 06:59:24 AM
This is awesome

https://apolloinrealtime.org/11/ (https://apolloinrealtime.org/11/)


(https://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/moon_landing.png)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on July 22, 2019, 09:08:51 AM
A lot of people have called attention to the fact that Buzz Aldrin's travel voucher for his mission to the moon netted him all of $33 and change.

Personally, I get a kick out of the first column where he traveled by "Gov. Air" and really, really wish he'd filled out the "Agent's Valuation of Ticket" and the "Mode, Class of Service, and Accommodations" columns
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on July 22, 2019, 03:48:04 PM
Too bad he didn't get, 'mileage'.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on July 22, 2019, 04:20:33 PM
Too bad he didn't get, 'mileage'.


you don't get it when you fly Gov Air.  All he got was the per diem for travel days where he was (presumably) feeding himself  ;D
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on July 22, 2019, 07:47:45 PM
I hope he at least got to adjust out his time worked when he got back.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on July 29, 2019, 10:05:49 AM
https://twitter.com/airandspace/status/1155841410861608960
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on July 29, 2019, 10:51:30 AM
https://twitter.com/airandspace/status/1155841410861608960

And in 25 more days he would go on to sign the Federal Aviation Act that would create the FAA. Of course, the CAA had already been around since 1938.  8)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on August 01, 2019, 08:47:34 AM
https://twitter.com/USArmyCMH/status/1156907482066948096
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on August 01, 2019, 03:19:23 PM
And Patton slapped somebody to celebrate.  :party:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on August 07, 2019, 07:28:16 PM
Today in 1942, the First Marine Division landed on Guadalcanal.
In 480 BC, Thermopylae may have occurred.  (Some question about the date.)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on August 13, 2019, 07:19:17 AM
 Spain's Missed Strategic Options in 1898

Spain did badly in its war with the United States in 1898. She could have done better. Much better. In fact, it is difficult to disagree with the belief of many Spanish officers, including Vice-Admiral Pascual Cervera, who commanded the squadron sunk off Santiago, that their government had given little thought to strategic planning beyond the notion of losing the war quickly.

The shattering defeats inflicted upon the Spanish fleet in Manila Bay and at Santiago were both avoidable.

Had the squadron in the Philippines been dispersed, rather than concentrated at Cavite, Commodore George Dewey would not have secured so signal a victory at the very outbreak of the war. With the Spanish ships dispersed among the archipelago's seven thousand islands scattered over 100,000 square miles of ocean, they would have posed a threat - a "fleet in being" - to the safety of an American expedition to seize Manila. Dewey would have found the task of searching all those potential hiding places tedious, time consuming, and potentially dangerous, yet necessary despite the relative worthlessness of the Spanish vessels in question. It would certainly have taken months to winkle out the last of the Spanish fleet. Of course, the Philippines were a side-show. The critical theater was the Atlantic.

In the Atlantic Admiral Cervera offered a much better strategy than merely sending his squadron to the Caribbean to be sunk. The U.S. could not safely invade Cuba until the Spanish fleet had been neutralized. Cervera proposed keeping the fleet concentrated in the Canary Islands. There it would continue to pose a threat to American maritime movements and at the same time be available to intercept possible American raids on the Spanish mainland. Spain's resources were adequate for this strategy. At the start of the war Spain had four major warships in commission, three Maria Teresa class armored cruisers plus the new armored cruiser Cristobal Colon, the ships that formed the core of the squadron that Cervera took to Santiago. Had Spain adopted this strategy, these vessels would have shortly been joined by two other major warships that were soon available, the battleship Pelayo, completing a refit, and the armored cruiser Carlos V, a very powerful vessel just entering service.

Even had they remained relatively inactive, these six heavy ships concentrated in the Canary Islands and supported by the available smaller cruisers and various lighter warships could easily have proven extremely worrisome to the United States Navy, constituting a relatively powerful fleet in being. From the Canaries, one or two of the armored cruisers and some of the half dozen or so smaller cruisers could have been sent to raid U.S. maritime commerce and threaten the East Coast, already experiencing something of a panic even before Cervera's squadron actually sailed. Such a strategy would have prolonged the war in several ways.

Had Spain adopted this course of action, the U.S. Navy would have been forced to divert resources from the Caribbean to chase the Spanish commerce raiders, and guard the Atlantic coastline. An American descent on Cuba or Puerto Rico would have been delayed, due to the shortage of escorts. Given that the U.S. Army was extremely concerned about the danger of operating in the Caribbean during the fever season, a landing in Puerto Rico or Cuba might easily have been delayed until the fall, assuming a decision was made to undertake one at all, given the potential danger from the Spanish fleet in the Canaries. Indeed, precisely what the U.S. would have done in such circumstance is difficult to determine. An expedition against the Canaries was actually considered by the U.S., but only after Cervera's defeat, and primarily as a means of preventing Spain from attempting to reinforce the Philippines. Moreover, it seems unlikely that the U.S. Navy could have done much more than undertaken a massive raid, lacking the logistical train to support a more serious expedition at such distance from North America.

Assuming that Cervera's squadron was sent to the Caribbean, the Spanish Navy could have supported it by creating a new fleet in being. Even as Cervera was sailing westwards, the Spanish government had begun concentrating a second squadron at Cadiz, comprising Pelayo, Carlos V, several cruisers, and three destroyers. This squadron was supposed to escort several troop transports to the Philippines in order to wrest control from Dewey's little squadron. Had this force instead been concentrated in the Canaries after Cervera's departure for the Caribbean, it would have limited the U.S. Navy's flexibility. As it was, the potential use of this second squadron the Atlantic caused the U.S. Navy some concern until mid-May, when it became clear that the squadron was bound for the Philippines, whereupon the Navy began spreading rumors of imminent raids on Spanish soil, to convince the Spaniards to recall it.

Even the American success in capturing the outer defenses of Santiago on July 1, in the battles of El Caney and San Juan Hill, was not necessarily decisive. If, instead of essaying a sortie, Cervera had been permitted to remain in Santiago, and committed all his manpower, weapons, ammunition, and supplies to the defense, resistance might have been prolonged. As it was, the final days of the siege saw something of a race between the American ability to keep the place invested in the face of increasing disease and privation and the Spanish ability to hold out, in the face of increasing disease and privation.

Of course Cervera did sortie, and Santiago did surrender. But even these losses did not mean that Spain retained no further options. Her army in Cuba remained virtually intact despite the loss of Santiago, and the Cuban guerrillas did not pose a significant threat. Most Spanish officers in Cuba believed they could deal with an American expedition against Havana, particularly given that, following the disastrous collapse of the victorious U.S. V Corps due to fever, such an undertaking would certainly be postponed for several months. While their optimism may be questioned, there is some validity to their logic. A defeat - or even a serious reverse - before Havana might have resulted in greater American willingness to seek less than total victory.

Of course, Spain ultimately was gong to lose the war. Nevertheless, by prolonging the war, American patience would have been tried, particularly given long casualty lists from disease. A more favorable international climate might have arisen, one in which the Great Powers might have lent their good offices to a negotiated settlement. Cuba would certainly still have been lost, but the Philippines and Puerto Rico might have been salvaged.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on August 15, 2019, 08:34:45 AM
https://twitter.com/USNHistory/status/1161978362874777600
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on August 15, 2019, 10:10:45 AM
Played that one in TOAW 4. The Germans gave me a hell-of-a-hard-time.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on August 20, 2019, 11:17:38 AM
https://twitter.com/airandspace/status/1163831822825992192
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on August 29, 2019, 08:35:16 AM
https://twitter.com/USNHistory/status/1167051791785168896
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on August 29, 2019, 10:47:29 AM
 :o
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on August 29, 2019, 11:52:54 AM
Yes, but was the harbor bottom okay?
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on August 29, 2019, 06:58:19 PM
Yes, but was the harbor bottom okay?

About as well as anyone can be after someone repeatedly slams an armored cruiser into your bottom. Actually, that doesn't sound quite right, does it...
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on August 29, 2019, 08:08:30 PM
The captain of the Memphis was the father of Ned Beach, who wrote Run Silent, Run Deep.
The son wrote a good book on the event, with lots of background on the coal fired navy.
The tsunami that caused the massive wave, was unpredicted, but it didn't save the captain for not doing enough.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on September 03, 2019, 07:11:53 AM

1925

The rigid airship, USS Shenandoah (ZR 1), crashes near Byesville, Ohio. There were fourteen casualties including the Commanding Officer, Lt. Zachary Lansdowne. Twenty-nine crew members survive.

1944

A PB4Y-1 Liberator plane launches to attack German submarine pens on Helgoland Island. The pilot, Lt. Ralph Spading, sets the radio controls and parachutes out of the Liberator, which is then controlled as a drone by Ensign J.M. Simpson in a PV-1.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on September 03, 2019, 07:30:32 PM

1925

The rigid airship, USS Shenandoah (ZR 1), crashes near Byesville, Ohio. There were fourteen casualties including the Commanding Officer, Lt. Zachary Lansdowne. Twenty-nine crew members survive.

The Shenandoah actually broke in to several pieces. The largest was the bow, which retained buoyancy and was free-ballooned to a safe landing by the remaining crew, including Commander (later admiral) Charles Rosendahl, author several books about Lighter-than-Air aviation, among them 'Up Ship'.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on September 04, 2019, 07:19:49 AM

1804

The ketch USS Intrepid, outfitted with a large explosive charge to destroy the enemy fleet in Tripoli harbor, is apparently intercepted while entering the harbor and is destroyed in a violent explosion. Lt. Richard Somers, commanding USS Intrepid, and his dozen volunteer officers and men perish in the mission.

1941

The German submarine U-652 attacks the destroyer USS Greer (DD 145), which is tracking the submarine southeast of Iceland. Though the destroyer is not damaged in the attack, USS Greers depth charges damage U-652. The attack leads President Franklin D. Roosevelt to issue his shoot-on-sight order, directing the Navy to attack any ship threatening U.S. shipping or foreign shipping under escort.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on September 08, 2019, 10:03:10 AM
https://twitter.com/airandspace/status/1170698367581790210
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on September 08, 2019, 11:02:56 AM
https://twitter.com/airandspace/status/1170698367581790210

(http://www.aarcentral.com/emoti/worship.gif)(http://www.aarcentral.com/emoti/worship.gif)(http://www.aarcentral.com/emoti/worship.gif)(http://www.aarcentral.com/emoti/worship.gif)(http://www.aarcentral.com/emoti/worship.gif)(http://www.aarcentral.com/emoti/worship.gif)(http://www.aarcentral.com/emoti/worship.gif)(http://www.aarcentral.com/emoti/worship.gif)(http://www.aarcentral.com/emoti/worship.gif)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on September 08, 2019, 01:48:34 PM
https://twitter.com/Battlefields/status/1170754970695733249
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on September 08, 2019, 10:43:26 PM
One of the 2 places at Gettysburg I HAD to see when I was there. It didn't disappoint.  :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on September 09, 2019, 09:35:43 AM
I'd read Joshua Chamberlain: The Soldier and the Man some time ago to review for Wargamer (https://www.wargamer.com/reviews/joshua-chamberlain-the-soldier-and-the-man/) (yes, my article, not Scott's). Chamberlain was quite the fan of Chamberlain, but there's no disputing what the 20th Maine did that second day of Gettysburg.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on September 16, 2019, 09:53:38 AM
Incidents of War - Washington's Rear Guard Action at Harlem Heights

In the summer of 1776 the City of New York, second or third largest in British America at about 20,000 inhabitants, was a prosperous port on the lower end of Manhattan.   With the American Revolution in full swing, should the British capture the city, it would make an excellent strategic base for operations throughout the rebellious colonies, and at the same time permit the British to project their forces over 150 miles upriver past Albany, splitting New England off from the rest of the United Colonies.

The city had a considerable loyalist population, but the Patriot movement was firmly in control. By the first reading of the Declaration of Independence in the city, on July 9th, New York had been extensively fortified in the months since the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, and was now held by strong forces under George Washington.

The army consisted of "veteran" troops whom Washington had redeployed from Boston after the British abandoned that city in March, as well as many new recruits and the local militia. Two of the units in the army were what would today be considered special troops, a body of Rangers organized by Lt. Col. Thomas Knowlton, a veteran of the original "Roger’s Rangers" of the French and Indian War, and a company of Virginia sharpshooters armed with the Pennsylvania long rifle. In the ranks of the army were such men as Nathan Hale, a captain of the Rangers, James Monroe, a lieutenant in the Virginia Rifles, and Alexander Hamilton, who had personally financed a battery of artillery.

In addition to fortifications along the East River, on both the Manhattan and Jersey sides of the North River (as the lower Hudson was called), and on Governor's Island, Washington had also directed that Brooklyn Heights be fortified, since artillery there could dominated the southern end of Manhattan. In this way the Patriots hoped to neutralize the British naval advantage, by positioning batteries at points along the rivers where the current could cause ships to come into range and also to protect the Army's line-of-retreat from Brooklyn Heights, where the British were expected to make their first attack.

The British, led by Lord Howe and his brother Admiral Richard Howe, arrived in the Lower Bay in mid-June and quickly occupied Staten Island, establishing a base of operations. They crossed the Narrows into Brooklyn on August 22, landing at what is now Fort Hamilton, with 15,000 British troops and 5,000 Hessians. Washington positioned his force in the defenses on the Heights, with detachments thrown forward to guard approaches from the east and southeast. Howe advanced on Washington's main line with the bulk of his Army, while sending elite units on a nocturnal march east to flank the American positions. Howe's plan worked well, and after a furious fight (the largest battle of the war, in fact) Washington was forced to withdraw across the East River on the night of August 29th, having lost 900 men captured and more than 250 killed.

Despite this success, the Howe brothers dithered. Hoping to secure a negotiated settlement, they meet with a congressional delegation on September 11th. But the Howe brothers demanded complete surrender in return for pardons, and Patriot delegates John Adams and Benjamin Franklin flatly refused to surrender. So on September 15th, the British attacked Manhattan, with the Royal Navy bombarding the fortified batteries and then landing in strength at Kips Bay (near the FDR Drive at 34th Street). British light infantry and Grenadiers quickly routed Lt. Col. William Douglas' green and heavily outnumbered 5th Connecticut Militia Battalion in a series of bayonet charges. Although senior officers, including Washington, who reportedly demonstrated command of some impressive profanity, attempted to halt the panic, the militiamen fled the field, abandoning their equipment. The landing at Kips Bay exposed to capture the American forces in New York City, to the south. The American troops rushed north through what is now Central Park to escape the trap. Had the British moved promptly, more than half the American Army would have been taken. But Lord Howe delayed, choosing to consolidated his beachhead and secure the city before pursuing the Americans (reportedly an accommodating widow with Patriot sympathies may have helped matters as well, as she "entertained" the general, delaying him for a time).

By the end of September 15th, the Americans had reached the security of fortified positions along Harlem Heights (just north of 125th Street on the West Side), while the British established their advanced positions along modern-day 96th Street. 

The American position on the high ground overlooked the fields of the Harlem plain to their south. Numbering about 9,000 men, the American lines extended along the Manhattanville depression called the “Hollow Way”, a valley extending diagonally from 121st Street and Eighth Avenue to the Hudson River at 130th Street, roughly following the peculiar trace of 125th Street. In addition, some 5,000 American troops were in the Kingsbridge area of the Bronx. The troops occupying Harlem Heights were divided into three brigades under the command of Nathanael Greene, Israel Putnam, and Joseph Spencer. Lt. Col. Knowlton, then some 37 years old, and six feet tall, was there with his 120 Rangers. Washington ordered Knowlton’s Rangers to undertake a reconnaissance to explore the British position at West 104th Street and skirmish with the enemy picket line to determine their position and strength.

Initially the British were encamped along the Bloomingdale Road (today Broadway) approximately at west 96th Street, with their left wing on the Hudson River and their line extending eastward into what is now Central Park, with outposts along what is now 104th Street and a picket line manned by light infantry along 106th Street. Behind the light infantry near 96th Street, on the left flank were the Hessians, while the 42nd Highlanders (The Black Watch), the 33rd Foot, and the Grenadiers were in reserve under the command of Lord Cornwallis. In overall field commander was Howe’s second-in-command Sir Henry Clinton.

Phase 1: Ranger Probe. The Rangers left their camp near Riverside Drive and 131st Street and moved south until they encountered the British picket line. As the Rangers began trading fire with the enemy pickets, three companies of British light infantry rushed up to reinforce their line. The Rangers stood their ground, trading shot for shot for more than half an hour. The British were then reinforced by two battalions of light infantry, which raised the numbers against the 120 Rangers to over 400 men.

Lt. Col. Knowlton decided to break off the action and retire after his men had fired an average of eight rounds apiece (nearly 1,000 rounds) into the enemy. The British light infantry pursued the retreating Americans sharply. The Rangers retreated back to their lines on what is now Claremont Avenue, with the British giving chase until they climbed the hill on Riverside Drive that is now the site of Grant’s Tomb. At that time a British bugler blew out the haughty and contempt-filled notes of "Gone Away," a fox hunting call that indicates the prey was in full flight.

Phase 2: American Counterstroke. As the Rangers reached the safety of the Patriot lines, Washington's Adjutant General, Col. Joseph Reed, who had observed the fire fight, recommended that the Rangers be reinforced for a counterattack. Irked by the mocking "Gone Away" call, Washington, an avid fox hunter himself, agreed and quickly planned a counterattack that would trap the British in the Hollow Way. The plan was to deploy one force as a feint, drawing the British into the Hollow Way while a second force encircled them on their left, by slipping down the shore of the Hudson River.

To execute the plan, 150 men from the 9th (Rhode Island) Continental Infantry commanded by Lt. Col. Archibald Crary, advanced into the Hollow Way. The British light infantry took the bait and came down from the high ground. A sharp fire-fight developed, with the Americans making good use of cover to maintain a heavy fire on the British, while drawing them further up the Hollow Way, until they were in a position about where 129th Street and Broadway meet today. Then Washington’s flanking force attacked.

The flanking column, commanded by Lt. Col. Knowlton, consisted of his Rangers and three companies of riflemen from the 3rd Virginia Continentals, commanded by Maj. Andrew Leitch, Capt. William Washington, and Lt. James Monroe. Knowlton appears to have intended to advance to a rocky ledge at what is now 124th Street between Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue, but the troops moved too quickly, hitting the British on the left flank rather than in their rear. During their fire fight with the Rhode Islanders, the British had adjusted their line and so prevented encirclement. Thus, when the Rangers and Virginians opened fire, the British stood their ground. Despite the death of Lt. Col. Knowlton and wounding of Maj. Leitch (who would later die), the Rangers and Virginians pressed their assault, as the Rhode Islanders attacked along the British front. Heavily pressed, the British light infantry gave ground.

Phase 3: Pursuit. As the British began retreating, the American foxes began nipping at their heels. As they fell back, to the vicinity of what is now Barnard College, the British light infantry called for reinforcements. Sir Henry Clinton quickly dispatched Lord Cornwallis and all of his reserves (the 33rd Foot, 42nd Highlanders, the Hessian and English Grenadiers, and a German Jäger company), as well as two pieces of field artillery, nearly 2,000 men. Washington also committed reinforcements including several companies of troops from Maryland, six additional companies from Nathanael Greene’s brigade, and even Lt. Col. Douglas’ 5th Connecticut Militia, who had fled at Kips Bay.

Soon nearly 4,000 men, both sides together, were heavily engaged under a hot sun on a hill in a cornfield between 116th Street and 120th Street along Broadway, now the site of Columbia University. Both sides delivered a furious storm of musket, rifle, and cannon fire. Although the British held their lines, the American fire was so fierce that the British regiments were unable to sustain their favorite tactic, the bayonet charge. The American militia who had fled the British and their bayonets days before now stood their ground and returned fire firmly. The fighting continued for two hours as both sides sustained the fire fight on the hilltop, a site today commemorated by a plaque on the Columbia University wall, just above 116th Street. The Americans pressed the British until they began to give way and fall back. Covered by the Highlanders and Jägers, the English retired to their original positions between 96th street and 104th street. Washington, fearing that Howe would order more reserves into action and undertake a counterattack of his own, recalled his men to their original positions to prepare for a possible renewal of the battle.

The long day of combat was over. Casualties were high. The British and their German allies had lost perhaps 15 percent of the troops committed, about 90 killed or mortally wounded plus perhaps 300 less seriously injured, while the Americans had lost about 10 percent, 30 killed or mortally wounded and about 100 others

Afterwards. Little remembered today, the Battle of Harlem Heights, one of the hottest fights in the Revolutionary War, provided an important boost to American morale, seriously harmed by the loss of New York City. Washington's first battlefield victory, it had demonstrated his ability to seize opportunities when they presented themselves, and to formulate and execute sound plans quickly. For the British, the battle dispelled the notion that the Americans would fold quickly.

--Richard Van Nort
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on September 26, 2019, 07:28:52 AM
America’s Biggest Battle

Probably most people would name the Battle of the Bulge in late 1944 and early 1945 as America’s greatest battle.  The Bulge, however, is only the second biggest battle in American history.  America’s biggest battle occurred a generation earlier, only about 60 miles southeast of where the Bulge unfolded, the Battle of the Meuse-Argonne, in 1918.
Battles Compared
   Meuse-Argonne   The Bulge
   Sep 26-Nov 11, ‘18   Dec 16, ‘44-Jan 16, ‘45
Days    47                            32
US *    1.26 million    1.0 million
Enemy    0.47 million    0.5 million
US Loses         
   Dead    26,277  (559/day)    c. 10,275 (321/day)
   Wound    95,786    c. 47,500
   Missing    c. 5,000**    c. 23,000***
* Figures exclude Allied troops.
** Some captured, most later declared kia.
*** Mostly captured, some later declared kia.

During the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, the average daily number of American battle deaths, 559, exceeded the daily average of battle deaths suffered by the French Army during the 302 day Battle of Verdun (Feb. 21-Dec. 19, 1916), about 530.

The primacy of the Meuse-Argonne extends even to materiél expended; nearly 2,500 American and French artillery pieces expended four million rounds in support of the offensive. This came to nearly 50,000 a day, the greatest barrage in American history.

 
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on September 26, 2019, 07:35:55 AM
Very Interesting. I was not aware of that fact.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on September 26, 2019, 12:02:53 PM
I've read about it but wasn't aware of all the numbers involved. Truly a massive, and decisive as I recall, battle/campaign. Thanks for the post.  :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on October 01, 2019, 08:04:07 AM
In 1880, John Philip Sousa becomes leader of the Marine Corps band.

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on October 03, 2019, 06:24:14 AM
Quote
Black Hawk Down. The crew of Super Six-Four in Somalia in 1993: Winn Mahuron, Tommy Field, Bill Cleveland, Ray Frank, Mike Durant.


One of my ROTC classmates lost her husband that day.  SFC Earl Fillmore was one of the Delta guys (and one of the youngest E7s in the Army).  His wife, Felicia, was finishing her degree at NC State after going back to college on a 2yr Green-to-Gold scholarship, and had completed all her ROTC training the year before I did.  Might pull up the movie today in the office and rewatch it.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on October 03, 2019, 09:02:42 AM
https://twitter.com/URDailyHistory/status/1179743150497136641
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on October 04, 2019, 11:36:41 AM
October 4, 1883.  First run of the Orient Express.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on October 06, 2019, 08:37:28 AM
https://twitter.com/USNHistory/status/1180822522822045696
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on October 06, 2019, 11:33:02 AM
https://twitter.com/MilHistNow/status/1180712789284753409
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on October 08, 2019, 07:42:09 AM
On October 3, 1943, Aircraft from USS Ranger sank five German ships and damaged three more in Operation Leader, the only U.S. Navy carrier operation in northern European waters during World War II. Defying enemy shore batteries and warships lurking in Norwegian waters, a combined United States and British naval force that included a strongly escorted American aircraft carrier, struck a surprise blow at German merchant shipping in the Norwegian “leads” or inner waterways in the Bodoe area. German naval units in Norway, where the powerful battleship Tirpitz was lying in a fjord somewhere northeast of Trondheim, refusing to accept the obvious challenge to come out and fight. The only opposition was by enemy anti-aircraft fire and by two German planes, both of which were destroyed by fighters that took off from the American carrier, USS Ranger. Three planes from the carrier were shot down by enemy anti-aircraft fire.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on October 08, 2019, 07:47:05 AM
Now that is interesting. Its an operation I had not heard of before.  :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on October 08, 2019, 02:48:41 PM
Now that is interesting. Its an operation I had not hear of before.  :bigthumb:

Same.  I wasn't aware of *any* Allied carrier operations in the European theater (until now).  Thanks for sharing, besilarius! 

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on October 08, 2019, 03:02:32 PM
Same.  I wasn't aware of *any* Allied carrier operations in the European theater (until now).  Thanks for sharing, besilarius!


I knew there was some in support of Operation Torch, but didn't know about this one
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on October 08, 2019, 03:07:56 PM
We had to do something with Ranger. She wasn't suitable for operations in the Pacific.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on October 08, 2019, 07:27:20 PM
That couldn't have been the original Ranger could it? Wasn't she sunk in 1941? I remember the U.S.S. Wasp was in one of the Malta runs in the Med.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on October 08, 2019, 07:44:54 PM
That couldn't have been the original Ranger could it? Wasn't she sunk in 1941? I remember the U.S.S. Wasp was in one of the Malta runs in the Med.

That was the USS Langley (CV-1), sunk by Japanese bombers in 42. Ranger (CV-4) stayed in the Atlantic and survived the war.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on October 08, 2019, 07:45:50 PM
Ranger made it through the war and was scrapped in '47. She was small and too slow to operate effectively in the Pacific. Too many compromises were made to fit her in under the Washington Treaty restrictions.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on October 08, 2019, 07:56:25 PM
I'm not sure it was the Treaty that was the problem. Her immediate predecessors, Saratoga and Lexington, were heavy cruisers that exceeded the treaty restrictions and were thus repurposed into CVs. Ranger was designed from the start to be a carrier. At that time the Navy still wasn't quite sure what it wanted and skimped too much, not realizing that eventually carriers would be the new battlewagons that set the pace for the rest of the fleet.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on October 08, 2019, 08:00:55 PM
I'm not sure it was the Treaty that was the problem. Her immediate predecessors, Saratoga and Lexington, were heavy cruisers that exceeded the treaty restrictions and were thus repurposed into CVs. Ranger was designed from the start to be a carrier. At that time the Navy still wasn't quite sure what it wanted and skimped too much, not realizing that eventually carriers would be the new battlewagons that set the pace for the rest of the fleet.

The treaty was the problem due to the tonnage limits. There was only so much tonnage left for new carriers after Sara and Lex were built. The Navy opted to try for more small carriers rather than a few big ones. Compromises were made in the Ranger design as a result.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on October 08, 2019, 08:11:11 PM
I see what you mean.

I just reviewed the Treaty and it says that each nation could convert two capital ships of up to 33,000 tons to CVs but that the following CVs would be restricted to 27,000 tons. Small flat tops of 10,000 or less didn't count and neither did any already existing ones such as Langley. That would explain Saratoga and Lexington as the USN's two big 'gimmes'.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on October 08, 2019, 08:24:25 PM
The treaty limits led to some interesting design choices.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on October 08, 2019, 11:14:49 PM
Thanks guys.  :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on October 14, 2019, 01:08:22 PM
https://twitter.com/URDailyHistory/status/1183791324757024768
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on October 15, 2019, 09:09:46 AM
1943         British Adm. Sir Andrew Cunningham is appointed First Sea Lord of the Admiralty and Chief of the Naval Staff (1943-1946)

An aside on ABC:

The Night the War Ended

Although a pacifist, during World War II, Nicholas Monsarrat (1910-1979), a promising young novelist, decided to do his bit to defeat Hitler. Being an avid yachtsman, he promptly joined the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve.

Commissioned a sub-lieutenant, Monsarrat saw service in corvettes during the most desperate days of the Battle of the Atlantic. Proving a capable officer, he was promoted with unusual speed for a temporary reservist. By war’s end, having commanded successively a corvette, a frigate, and an escort group, and helped conduct numerous convoys across the ocean, he had risen to captain, and was serving on the staff of the Admiralty in London.

With the formal surrender of Germany on May 8, 1945, a carnival atmosphere quickly developed in London. By chance, Monsarrat was the Duty Captain in the Admiralty that night, assigned to stand watch in the command center. He arrived at the Admiralty at 9:00 p.m., by which time perhaps a million happy people were crowded into central London. From his post, Monsarrat could hear the cheers and singing of the crowds outside the historic Admiralty building, which had seen many a similar crowd celebrating Britain’s victories since it had been completed in 1726. As he would later write, “On a guilty impulse I deserted my post” to take in the scene. He made his way to the top of the great stone arch which marks the formal entrance to the Admiralty.

From the top of Admiralty Arch, Monsarrat could see an enormous host of people cheering and singing, from Buckingham Palace to Trafalgar Square and, most astonishing of all, a city in lights for the first time since blackouts had begun, nearly six years earlier.

But then he noticed something else, which he described in his memoirs.

        Then, on a half-turn, I became aware that I was not alone, on top of the Admiralty Arch.

        There was someone standing within five yards of me, also staring down at the crowds, and oblivious of close company for the same reason as I had been—because we were both entranced by the magnet of what was going on below.  With that perceptible twinge of nervousness which had been built into my life for so many years, I recognized, first the rank and then the man.

        The massive display of gold braid told me that he was an admiral, like his brave and lonely brother on top of the column [Nelson].  Then I realized that this was a very superior admiral indeed.  I counted one thick band of gold, and four thinner ones.  He was an Admiral of the Fleet-the highest any sailor could go.

        In fact, I suddenly recognized, he was the Admiral of the Fleet.  The man in my company was the First Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff, Admiral Cunningham.

Admiral of the Fleet Andrew Browne Cunningham, 1st Viscount Cunningham of Hyndhope, Bt, KT, GCB, OM, DSO (1883-1964), the most distinguished British sea-dog since Nelson, had joined the Navy at 15 in 1898, and been in the service for 47 years, seeing action in destroyers during World War I, at Gallipoli, on the Dover Patrol, and elsewhere, and then risen steadily in the years of peace, and then, during the first half of World War II had put in a masterful performance as Commander-in-Chief of the Mediterranean Fleet, before being named First Sea Lord.

Monsarrat took his discharge from the Royal Navy in 1946, For some years he served in the diplomatic corps, but then retired to become a full-time writer, and produced a steady stream of novels and short stories, most notably the brilliant The Cruel Sea, many of them based on his experiences in the war.

 

Note: Nicholas Monsarrat’s memoirs, published in the U.S. in one volume, BREAKING IN- BREAKING OUT AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY BY NICHOLAS MONSARRAT (New York: Morrow, 1971) has a detailed account of his wartime service. Much of this experience was used in his best novel, which remains in print, The Cruel Sea (Springfield, N.J.: Burford Books, 2000), which was made into a superior film in 1953, The Cruel Sea , starring Jack Hawkins.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on October 15, 2019, 09:14:09 AM
nice tale there
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on October 15, 2019, 12:13:44 PM
Without Cunningham, there would've likely been far less to celebrate and Englishmen to celebrate it.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on October 15, 2019, 01:22:24 PM
Interesting stuff. been a lot of years since I read the book, or watched the film for that matter.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on October 15, 2019, 02:47:11 PM
nice tale there

Seconded.  Thanks for sharing that, besilarius

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on October 16, 2019, 08:07:49 AM
https://twitter.com/URDailyHistory/status/1184440351408279552
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on October 17, 2019, 05:28:25 AM
https://twitter.com/danieledwardsma/status/1184757120543145984
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on October 17, 2019, 06:50:47 AM
Mind you, three of them got out twice to go to the loo...................
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on October 17, 2019, 08:49:46 AM
William the Conqueror and the Logistics of the Conquest

It’s well known that in the summer of 1066 Duke William of Normandy concentrated an army of some 14,000 men and 3000-4000 horses, crossed the English Channel, and wrested the crown of England from his cousin Harold Godwinson. Now crossing the channel is a considerable accomplishment in any age, given its treacherous waters, so William deserves credit for that, perhaps as much as for his hard-fought victory in the Battle of Hasting (October 14, 1066). But William’s greatest struggle was perhaps logistical.

William’s concentrated his army at Dives-sur-mer, where it spent most of August of 1066 training and preparing. It was a “pot luck” host. Although it contained many of William’s Norman subjects, it also included a lot of adventurers from all over Europe, including knights from Italy and Spain, as well as from other parts of France. A large contingent consisted of Norman veterans who had long-experience of war against the Lombards and Byzantines in Southern Italy and the Moslems in Sicily.

Taking care of this army – as small as it may seem in modern terms – was a major undertaking.

The average man eats about four pounds of food a day, and drink about a gallon of water. So for an army of 14,000, William had to supply about 28 tons of food, mostly grain, plus 14,000 gallons of water, without considering more than the barest diet, nor things like beer or wine, commonplaces of the medieval diet. Thus, in a month, William’s 14,000 men required 868 tons of food and over 400,000 gallons of water.

Of course, William’s army also included between 3,000 and 4,000 horses. War horses of between 1300-1500 pounds eat about 24 pounds of feed and fodder each day. In William’s time about half of this would have been grains, mostly barely or spelt, though occasionally oats, while the other half would have been cut hay; green grass could be substituted, but in a 3:1 ratio, which would have meant that the horses would have spent so much their time eating there would have been little time for exercise and training. Of course, each horse also required between 8 and 12 gallons of water, depending upon the weather. So each day, William’s horses required 12-18 tons of grain and as much again of hay, plus 24,000-48,000 gallons of water. In addition, since stabling the horses required a daily supply of 2-4 pounds of fresh straw per animal, to line their stalls, William had to come up with 4-5 tons of that stuff each day. So for his month’s encampment, William’s horses required between 745 and 1,115 tons of feed and fodder, plus 125-150 tons of straw, and between 620,000 and 930,000 gallons of water, figures that make the supply requirements of the men seem minuscule.

Of course not only did William have to supply food and water, he also had to cope with the consequences of large numbers of men and horses consuming food and water. Each day William’s men would each have left about three pounds of feces and perhaps a quart of urine, for a daily output of about 21 tons of more-or-less solids plus perhaps 3,500 gallons of liquids. For the entire month the army was at Dives-sur-mer, this would have amounted to some 650 tons and nearly 110,000 gallons. But, as with rations, those figures pale when compared to the equivalent numbers for horses. A horse produces some 20 pounds of feces and 7.5-8.5 gallons of urine a day. So for the month the army was in camp William had to deal with about 930 tons of horse manure and 480,000-720,00 gallons of urine.

How William managed to dispose of all this sewage is unclear.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on October 17, 2019, 09:02:23 AM
Interesting, if a bit smelly.

they say that horse sh...manure is good on rhubarb. never tried myself, always preferred custard.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on October 17, 2019, 09:11:29 AM
Horse custard?

(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/qKhit2nsoq4/hqdefault.jpg)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on October 17, 2019, 09:18:32 AM
Ah, a nice picture of the London Asylum.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on October 23, 2019, 08:05:58 AM
https://twitter.com/URDailyHistory/status/1186976563352555520
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on October 23, 2019, 11:07:16 AM
Georgy was a motivator no question.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on October 23, 2019, 02:15:07 PM
Not a particularly nice guy, or a good guy.
However, I can forgive him anything for taking out Beria.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on October 25, 2019, 04:44:56 PM
As God is my witness, I thought turkeys could fly.

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on October 25, 2019, 06:41:31 PM
 :bigthumb:

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on October 28, 2019, 09:35:14 AM
Former Sergeant Angelo Roncarli dies in 1963. 
When asked how many people work in the Vatican, he deadpanned, "About half."
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 01, 2019, 06:46:43 AM
On November 1, 1950, would-be assassins Griselio Torresola and Oscar Collazo, Nationalists who supported the independence of Puerto Rico from the United States, attacked officers at the Blair House in order to assassinate President Truman. He was living there because of a major renovation at the White House for structural problems.

Torresola approached from the west side while Collazo engaged Secret Service agents and White House policemen from the east. Torresola approached the guard booth at the west corner of the Blair House and fired at officer leslie Coffelt from close range. His three shots struck Coffelt in the chest and abdomen, mortally wounding him. A fourth shot passed through the policeman's tunic.

Torresola shot two other policemen before running out of ammunition, then moved to the left of the Blair House steps to reload. Coffelt went out of his booth and fired at Torresola from 31 feet away, hitting him behind the ear and killing him instantly. Coffelt limped back to the booth and blacked out. He died of his wounds four hours later in a hospital.

"The S.S. chief said to me, "Mr. President, don't you know that when there's an Air Raid Alarm you don't run out and look up, you go for cover." I saw the point but it was over then.
Hope it won't happen again. They won't let me go walking or even cross the street on foot. I say 'they' won't, but it causes them so much anguish that I conform ... But I want no more guards killed." - Letter from Truman to his cousin, Ethel Noland, dated November 17, 1950

The would be assasins were totally out of touch.  Truman was known  for his morning walks, and detested having the S.S. (Secret Service) agents along.  He ordered them to always stay at least twenty feet behind.  If the bozos had attempted a drive by shooting, their chances of success would have been astronomical.
Even if they had gotten to Blair House's front door, there was an FBI agent with a tommy gun twenty feet down the aisle waiting for them to open the door.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on November 01, 2019, 06:55:18 AM
Interesting! I'd not heard about that before.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 01, 2019, 11:02:39 PM
In 1700, King Charles of Spain dies, beginning the War of the Spanish Succession.

Idiots-in-Chief: King Louis XIV of France

On his deathbed, Louis XIV, traditionally regarded as one of the greatest kings of France (r., 1643-1715), told his 5-year old great-grandson, who was about to become Louis XV, "I have been too fond of war; do not imitate me in that . . . ."  It was plain statement of the truth; from the time Louis XIV assumed full power, at the age of 18 in 1661, France was at war for about 30 of the 54 years until his death

Oddly, the longest, most terrible, and most costly of these conflicts, the War of the Spanish Succession (1701-1714), might easily have been avoided.

The causus belli of the war was the death of the last Spanish Hapsburg, King Charles II (r. 1661-1700).  Despite having been married twice, Charles died without leaving any children, probably due to impotence, and without any clear close relative eligible to succeed him.  Now since Charles' health had always been precarious, the Spanish succession naturally interested the principal monarchs of Europe, Louis XIV, head of the House of Bourbon, and the Holy Roman Emperor Leopold I, head of the House of Hapsburg.  Leopold had married Charles' sister, Margarita Teresa, while Louis had wed the Spanish king's half-sister, Maria Teresa, and thus both had heirs would could claim a tie to the Spanish throne.

Attempting to settle the matter peacefully, in 1668 Louis and Leopold agreed that upon the death of King Charles, the Spanish Empire would be divided.  Louis would gain The Spanish Netherlands [Belgium], Lombardy, Sardinia, and Navarre, as well as Naples and Sicily (which France had been trying to conquer since the 13th century), plus the Philippines, while the Habsburg claimant to the throne would get Spain proper and the Americas.  This seemed an equitable solution to the problem, since each dynasty gained something from the deal, while Spain was united with neither, which would have created an unprecedented superpower.

Alas for peaceful settle of international problems, when Charles finally died in 1700, Louis promptly decided to scrap the agreement, hoping to secure the entire Spanish Empire for his middle grandson, Philip of Anjou, then about 17.  Naturally, Leopold, and most of the rest of Europe's monarchs objected.

The result was war, as the champions of the various claimants --at one point there were actually three!-- fought it out across much of Europe and goodly portions of the rest of the world as well.  In the end, exhaustion, the deaths of some of the claimants, and Bourbon victories in Spain, led to the accession of Philip of Anjou as King Philip V of Spain, who would reign, with a slight interruption, until 1746, over a rather diminished Spanish Empire.

So Louis had gained the throne of France for his family -- though with tough treaty arrangements barring the merger of the two kingdoms under a single ruler.  Of course Spain was devastated by the decade of war, while France’s economy was in a shambles.  Worse, France had lost its colonies in Hudson’s Bay, Newfoundland, and Acadia to Britain, while Spain had lost the Spanish Netherlands, Naples, Lombardy, and Sardinia to Austria, Sicily to Piedmont, Minorca, in the Mediterranean and Gibraltar to Britain, and territories in South America to Portugal

So Louis XIV can truly be considered an idiot-in-chief.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on November 02, 2019, 07:17:07 AM
I've done quite a lot of reading about this period, since I'm gaming it at present. Its a very interesting period, from the 9 years war up to the 7 years war and the war of independence.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 02, 2019, 07:54:33 AM
Some folks are always seeking new "Imagi-Nations" and hypothetical wars.  If Louis had not broken the original agreement, this could have been a great situation to game out.
England, Holland, and Austria would have had to ally together to face the combined power of France and Spain.  Without the fortifications in the area of Belgium, any conflict would have strategically evolved very differently.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 02, 2019, 08:04:09 AM
Captain-General of Venice, Bartolomeo Colleoni, condottiere,. dies at 75.
Had to pay Verrochio for his own statue.

https://www.wga.hu/art/v/verocchi/sculptur/colleoni.jpg
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on November 02, 2019, 08:48:16 AM
I'm probably going to have to pay someone for my own statue.  :sigh:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on November 02, 2019, 07:51:04 PM
I'm probably going to have to pay someone for my own statue.  :sigh:

If you play your cards right, you could get them to pay you not to build your statue
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on November 03, 2019, 05:41:53 AM
...and then use the money to...build a statue......... ???
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 03, 2019, 07:44:02 AM
No, not a statue.  With a name like bbmike, maybe a ship?
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on November 03, 2019, 08:25:31 AM
Something prestigious, like an LCS perhaps?
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on November 03, 2019, 08:46:15 AM
So, it'll be the SS bbmike?
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on November 04, 2019, 07:57:21 AM
Maybe in England, so it's the HMS SS bbmike?
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 04, 2019, 08:09:14 AM
Battle of the 1,000 slain.
Michikiniqua, Little Turtle, of the Miami Confederation annihaltes the fledgling american army of the Ohio in 1791.

A native force consisting of around 1,000 warriors, led by Little Turtle and Blue Jacket, waited in the woods until dawn, when the men stacked their weapons and paraded to their morning meals. Adjutant General Winthrop Sargent had just reprimanded the militia for failing to conduct reconnaissance patrols when the natives then struck, surprising the Americans and overrunning their ground.

Little Turtle directed the first attack at the militia, who fled across a stream without their weapons. The regulars immediately broke their musket stacks, formed battle lines and fired a volley into the natives, forcing them back. Little Turtle responded by flanking the regulars and closing in on them. Meanwhile, St. Clair's artillery was stationed on a nearby bluff and was wheeling into position when the gun crews were killed by native marksmen, and the survivors were forced to spike their guns.
After three hours of fighting, St. Clair called together the remaining officers and, faced with total annihilation, decided to attempt one last bayonet charge to get through the native line and escape. Supplies and wounded were left in camp. As before, Little Turtle's Army allowed the bayonets to pass through, but this time the men ran for Fort Jefferson. They were pursued by Indians for about three miles before the latter broke off pursuit and returned to loot the camp. Exact numbers of wounded are not known, but it has been reported that execution fires burned for several days afterwards.

The casualty rate was the highest percentage ever suffered by a United States Army unit and included St. Clair's second in command, Richard Butler. Of the 52 officers engaged, 39 were killed and 7 wounded; around 88% of all officers became casualties. After two hours St. Clair ordered a retreat, which quickly turned into a rout. "It was, in fact, a flight," St. Clair described a few days later in a letter to the Secretary of War. The American casualty rate, among the soldiers, was 97.4 percent, including 632 of 920 killed (69%) and 264 wounded. Nearly all of the 200 camp followers were slaughtered, for a total of 832 Americans killed. Approximately one-quarter of the entire U.S. Army had been wiped out. Only 24 of the 920 officers and men engaged came out of it unscathed, the survivors included Benjamin Van Cleve and his uncle Robert Benham; van Cleve was one the few who were unharmed. Native casualties were about 61, with at least 21 killed.

The number of U.S. soldiers killed during this engagement was more than three times the number the Sioux would kill 85 years later at the Battle of Little Big Horn. Historian William Hogeland calls it "the high-water mark in resistance to white expansion. No comparable Indian victory would follow."[18] The next day the remnants of the force arrived at the nearest U.S. outpost, Fort Jefferson, and from there returned to Fort Washington.

President Washington's desire to keep the judicial branch from overseeing the actions of the executive branch led to the first Cabinet meeting, and then the idea of executive privelege.

Mad Anthony Wayne beat the Miamis with the well trained Legion of the United State at the Battle of Fallen Timbers.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on November 04, 2019, 08:33:28 AM
No, not a statue.  With a name like bbmike, maybe a ship?

So, it'll be the SS bbmike?

Maybe in England, so it's the HMS SS bbmike?

Guys, the alphanumeric abbreviations for battleships were always "BB-xx"
BB-61 was the USS Iowa
BB-63 was the USS Missouri
BB-21 was the USS Kansas
BB-18 was the USS New Jersey
BB-8 wasn't just a Star Wars droid.  It was also the USS Alabama (which was not a submarine, despite the movie)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on November 04, 2019, 08:39:54 AM
BB = battleship? Who knew.............

You'll be trying to tell us that CV  = Fleet carrier, next.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on November 04, 2019, 08:40:48 AM
Ok, extrapolating from that, let's use the Pythagorean system of numerology to assign numbers to letters:

1 = a, j, s,
2 = b, k, t,
3 = c, l, u,
4 = d, m, v,
5 = e, n, w,
6 = f, o, x,
7 = g, p, y,
8 = h, q, z,
9 = i, r,

Therefore, bbmike = BB- 4 + 9 + 2 + 5 = BB-20

BB-20 is the USS Vermont, a Connecticut-class battleship. I'm reckoning bbmike is about as old as that one, so...  :D
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on November 04, 2019, 08:42:09 AM
BB = battleship? Who knew.............

You'll be trying to tell us that CV  = Fleet carrier, next.



(https://media.giphy.com/media/C6qLqlAomfOMM/source.gif)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on November 04, 2019, 08:52:50 AM
Ok, extrapolating from that, let's use the Pythagorean system of numerology to assign numbers to letters:

1 = a, j, s,
2 = b, k, t,
3 = c, l, u,
4 = d, m, v,
5 = e, n, w,
6 = f, o, x,
7 = g, p, y,
8 = h, q, z,
9 = i, r,

Therefore, bbmike = BB- 4 + 9 + 2 + 5 = BB-20

BB-20 is the USS Vermont, a Connecticut-class battleship. I'm reckoning bbmike is about as old as that one, so...  :D

I figured I'd be more like the SS Minnow.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on November 04, 2019, 09:12:56 AM
 ::) :whistle:
BB = battleship? Who knew.............

You'll be trying to tell us that CV  = Fleet carrier, next.



(https://media.giphy.com/media/C6qLqlAomfOMM/source.gif)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on November 05, 2019, 07:17:19 AM
https://twitter.com/URDailyHistory/status/1191656651344031744
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on November 05, 2019, 07:20:27 AM
Very interesting - not seen that before. :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 05, 2019, 08:09:00 AM
Remember,. Remember, the Fifth of November.

Some people enjoy traditions a bit too much.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on November 05, 2019, 08:37:19 AM
https://twitter.com/USNHistory/status/1191709265741914113
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on November 05, 2019, 01:36:43 PM
https://twitter.com/flynavy/status/1191728861731606529
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on November 05, 2019, 02:40:27 PM
and they've been talking about it ever since
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on November 05, 2019, 02:43:10 PM
"Hey Henry. Go sit in that thing a second will you and I'll snap your picture".  :notme:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on November 05, 2019, 02:44:43 PM
...'sucker!...................
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 05, 2019, 03:32:32 PM
How can you tell if a pilot is at your party?    Don't worry, he will tell you.

What's the difference between a pilot and a jet engine?  Jet engines don't whine when not in use.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 06, 2019, 08:00:48 AM
An auspicious day!

1866         Prof. Arronax, Conseil, and Ned Land are taken aboard Capt. Nemo's 'Nautilus' to begin "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea"

The Last “Prize” Awards in the U.S. Navy?

The awarding of prize was an ancient naval custom.  Essentially, the officers and men of a warship that captured an enemy vessel were allowed to divvy up the loot.  Although the complex formula governing the division of the spoils gave the lion’s share to the officers, and particularly the captain, a rich prize could easily leave even an ordinary cabin boy with a year’s pay in his pocket.

For much of its history the United States Navy awarded prize.  But in 1900 it was decided to abolish the practice.
Nevertheless, a case could be made that the U.S. Navy actually awarded prize money in 1947.  It seems that in November 1941, while on "Neutrality Patrol" in the waters between Brazil and Africa, the light cruiser Omaha (CL-4) and the destroyer Somers (DD-381) came upon a merchant ship flying the U.S. flag, and bearing "Willmoto – Philadelphia” on her stern.  As the appearance of the ship did not match the silhouette in the recognitions books, a boarding party was sent from Omaha.  The vessel turned out to be the German motorship Odenwald, on a blockade running mission.  As the Americans clambered aboard, the ship's crew tried to scuttle her, but the Yankee sailors were too quick, and quickly got things under control.

Oldenwald was taken to Puerto Rico.  An admiralty court ruled that since the ship was illegally claiming American registration, there was sufficient grounds for confiscation.  At that point, some sea lawyers got into the act.  Observing that the attempt to scuttle the ship was the equivalent of abandoning her, they claimed that the crews of the two American ships had salvage rights, to the tune of $3 million.  This led to a protracted court case, which was not settled until 1947.  At that time it was ruled that the members of the boarding party and the prize crew were entitled to $3,000 apiece, the equivalent today of over $25,000 according to the Consumer Price Index, but easily nearly twice that on the basis of the prevailing “minimum wage,” while all the other crewmen in Omaha and Somers were entitled to two months’ pay and allowances at their then current rate.

By then, both Omaha and Somers had already gone to the scrap yard.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on November 06, 2019, 08:32:21 AM
What a fascinating story!  :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on November 06, 2019, 02:56:20 PM
Agreed!  I'd not heard about that before. 
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 07, 2019, 07:56:15 AM
The sailing ship Mary Celeste departs New York harbor in 1872 bound for mystery.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Celeste
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on November 07, 2019, 11:31:35 AM
That story left me with a real sinking feeling.  :hehe:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on November 07, 2019, 11:36:20 AM
It really is still a very intriguing mystery though, innit?
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 08, 2019, 08:07:06 AM
Bonnie Prince Charlie lands in Scotland..
The "The Forty-Five" (1745-1746): The Young Pretender put an expedition together without the help of Louis XV, and successfully landed in Scotland.  Many clans turned out to support him, and he quickly secured much of Scotland, though strong British garrisons remained in some places.  An English force was beaten at Prestonpans (Sept. 21, 1745), and the Jacobites advanced into England, reaching as far south as Derby, some 125 miles from London.  But desertions were rife.  Jacobite leaders lost heart and opted to retreat back to Scotland.  There they were decisively defeated at Culloden (April 16, 1746).  As English forces overrun Scotland with great brutality, the Young Pretender fled once again to France.

An interesting appendix to the Forty-Five comes from that hard, old man, Admiral John Jervis, Lord Nelson's mentor.  A great hater, he loathed all things, and all people, Schottishe.
During the Napoleonic War, as First Sea Lord he had to answer in Parliament for naval affairs.  Asked about a French invasion of England, he gave one of the great quotes:r "I do not say the French will not come.  I merely say they will not come by sea."

What most folks don't understand is that he meant the French would invade out of Scotland.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 09, 2019, 08:26:28 AM
USS Olympia arrives at the Washington Navy Yard with the Unknonw Soldier, 1921.

https://usnhistory.navylive.dodlive.mil/2018/11/08/the-ship-that-carried-him-the-naval-odyssey-of-the-unknown-soldier/

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on November 09, 2019, 01:46:54 PM
Damn, this shit always gets me.  Thanks for sharing, besilarius

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 10, 2019, 12:46:32 PM
A collision at sea can ruin your whole day - Thucydides.

On 10 November 1966, the USS Nautilus (SSN-571) collided with the USS Essex (CVS-9) while running submerged about 350 miles east of Morehead City, North Carolina, during underway replenishment exercises. Both ships returned to port unassisted. The submarine received extensive damage to its sail area and went to New London, The carrier sustained an open hull cut in the bow area and proceeded to Norfolk, Virginia.

 http://www.navsource.org/archives/08/08571.htm

The Nautilus was a real game changer for ASW.  Old sailors told stories of how it could run away from destroyers.  At the time of her introduction, sonar couldn't operate at more than about sixteen knots.  So she could just crank it up and even though this made her very noisy, the destroyers couldn't follow and hear.Think I've mentioned there was an old, salty Quartermaster E8 at Surface Warfare school in Newport.  He told the story that her sound signature was very distinctive.  After she was tracked once, you could always ID her.  The navy tried for years to discover this anomoly.  It finally was fixed when the coffee urn in the Goat Locker was replaced.  The grounding arrangement was not done correctly and caused a harmonic vibration that sonar picked up.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 12, 2019, 08:28:11 AM
First Naval Battle of Guadalcanal.

San Francisco dukes it out with BB Hiei.   "a barroom brawl after the lights had been shot out".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naval_Battle_of_Guadalcanal

A great illustration of unprepared leadership and lack of training.  Admiral Callaghan was the senior officer, but had not been engaged with the enemy before.  He distrusted radar and tried to fight the night battle by visual. 
During the night battle three members of San Francisco's crew won Medal of Honors.  Lcr Schonman, the Damage Control Assistant, who saved the ship from sinking, Lcdr McCandless who took over after all the bridge crew was killed, and  24 year old Boatswain Mate Reinhardt Keppler.

For extraordinary heroism and distinguished courage above and beyond the call of duty while serving aboard the U.S.S. San Francisco during action against enemy Japanese forces in the Solomon Islands, 12–November 13, 1942. When a hostile torpedo plane, during a daylight air raid, crashed on the after machine-gun platform, KEPPLER promptly assisted in the removal of the dead and, by his capable supervision of the wounded, undoubtedly helped save the lives of several shipmates who otherwise might have perished. That night, when the hangar was set afire during the great battle off Savo Island, he bravely led a hose into the starboard side of the stricken area and there, without assistance and despite frequent hits from terrific enemy bombardment, eventually brought the fire under control. Later, although mortally wounded, he labored valiantly in the midst of bursting shells, persistently directing fire-fighting operations and administrating to wounded personnel until he finally collapsed from loss of blood, aged 24. His great personal valor, maintained with utter disregard of personal safety, was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on November 13, 2019, 07:17:26 AM
https://twitter.com/URDailyHistory/status/1194587966649225216
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on November 13, 2019, 07:22:39 AM
I remember reading about that.

...Oops!
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 13, 2019, 08:03:07 AM
Whenever the William D Porter (not so affectionately called "the dirty bill") pulled into a new port, the ships would signal, "Do not Shoot!  We are all Republicans."
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on November 13, 2019, 08:38:30 AM
ROFL  ;D
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on November 13, 2019, 12:10:37 PM
https://twitter.com/URDailyHistory/status/1194662709062553600
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on November 13, 2019, 01:32:07 PM
https://twitter.com/URDailyHistory/status/1194587966649225216

Huh.  There's a bit of history trivia I'd never even heard of til now.  Interesting! 

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on November 13, 2019, 01:38:34 PM
Apparently that incident was just one of several that befell that ship.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on November 14, 2019, 09:32:35 AM
https://twitter.com/airandspace/status/1194985859843608582
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on November 14, 2019, 10:29:57 AM
The Bus Boy maybe?  ???
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 15, 2019, 10:32:59 AM
Battleship action of Guadalcanal

http://www.navweaps.com/index_lundgren/bbActionGuadalcanal.php

Some interesting asides.
No one bothered to alert the PT boats on Tulagi that Washington and South Dakota were going to be in Iron Bottom Sound.  Admiral Lee's nickname at Annapolis was Ching.   on Washington, he heard the PT boats when they spotted the US ships.  The PT commander assumed they were Japanese battleships and was preparing to make a torpedo attack.  Lee went on the radio, "This is Ching-Chong China Lee, do you know who I am?"  The small boat officer was surprised and answered that they did.
"Well, get out of the way and enjoy the show., we're going in>"
The boats went into shallow water, anchored and watched the gunfight while munching on fruit turnovers.

South Dakota had an electrical problem that ould not be diagnosed.  On occasion, the system shorted out after the main batteries fired.  There would be a lag while the generators came on line that meant the main batteries couldn't fire for minutes at a time.  To try to solve this, the Chief Engineer tied down the circuit breakers on the main electrical board.  This was against all practice, and conttributed to her losing electrical power during the battle.

The first hit on Atago was potentially fatal.  It destroyed the soy sauce locker.

And finally, an evaluation of the 14 inch round that hit South Dakots.   http://www.navweaps.com/index_tech/tech-092.php

Oh, and when the BBs were retiring, Washington covered the damaged South Dakota.  Sodak was leaking oil and foiled the Washington's evaporators.  The ship was on restricted water hours for days.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on November 15, 2019, 12:46:57 PM
Nice! Lots of new info there. Thanks for the post.  :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on November 15, 2019, 01:16:16 PM
Yeah; very interesting  :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on November 17, 2019, 07:43:59 AM
https://twitter.com/URDailyHistory/status/1196041544429658112
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on November 17, 2019, 11:45:25 PM
Happy B. Day Monty and thank you for that whole, 'Market-Garden' thing. It made a great book and a better than average war movie. Plus some good games to play too.  :applause:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on November 18, 2019, 06:05:51 PM
https://twitter.com/URDailyHistory/status/1196564742057234432
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on November 18, 2019, 06:07:55 PM
Horrific.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 19, 2019, 07:48:44 AM
Battle of Vianden, 1944.
Thirty Luxemburg militia hold out in the medieval castle against 250 Waffen SS.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Vianden
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 20, 2019, 08:12:30 AM
On this day in 1956, Admiral Farragut's flagship, USS Hartford, sank at the pier in Norfolk, Va.
President Roosevelt had wished to establish a naval history museum at the Washington, DC Navy Yard and had planned to refurbish Hartford, the cruiser Olympia, and a World War I four stacker destroyer.  With his death, this project was shelved, and Hartford was left to rot.

An interesting sidenote, was the the guided missile leader, USS Farragut (DLG-6) had a slice of Hartford's bowsprit displayed next to the Captain's cabin.  It was a hexagonal piece of wood, maybe ten inches in width and breadth, and had a nice plaque.  Oddly, there was a pie shaped slice missing on the top.
This was intriguing, and I couldn't figure out any reason why this notch would be there.  It made no sense..
No one in the wardroom had any idea why, it just was always that way.
Knowing that any lore of the ship was kept in the Goat Locker (the CPO mess) I asked the Chief Radioman, Charley Brown.  He was a very sharp, loquacious sailor and loved a good sea story.
According to him, during one of the Mediterranean cruises in the 1960s, the ship visited a Spanish port.  One of the local grandees was into history, and claimed some relation to Admiral Farragut's spanish forbearers.  He was given a tour of the ship and then he  invited the captain into his palatial home.  During this visit, he and the captain toasted the Admiral at length and got a little tipsy. 
Giving the captain a tour of his villa, they were in his wine cellar when the captain stumbled.  He knocked over a wine rack loaded with old, valuable bottles of wine.
To make up for this faux pas, the captain rushed back to the ship and had the machine shop cut out the sliver from Hartford's bowsprit.  This was presented it to the grandee in apology for breaking all that wine.
I'm sure that the artifact was removed when Farragut was decommissioned in 1989 and is now on display on the Burke class destroyer DDG-99.  And probably everyone who sees it wonders, "Why is there a slice missing?"
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on November 20, 2019, 04:14:39 PM
Ha!  That's a great little slice of a story, besilarius (sorry, couldn't resist).  Thanks for sharing! 
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on November 20, 2019, 06:57:41 PM
Ha!  That's a great little slice of a story, besilarius (sorry, couldn't resist).  Thanks for sharing!

Yess... yess... embrace the Dark Side...
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on November 20, 2019, 07:01:01 PM
I donno. The story sounds like it has a hole in it to me.  ::)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on November 20, 2019, 08:51:07 PM
https://twitter.com/WWIIpix/status/1197104864939171840
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on November 21, 2019, 12:02:10 AM
Ha!  That's a great little slice of a story, besilarius (sorry, couldn't resist).  Thanks for sharing!

Yess... yess... embrace the Dark Side...

I'm already there, man.  I just have standards, unlike most of you miscreants.  :bringit: 
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 21, 2019, 07:46:31 AM
Today in Military History- 1338

An archer named Robin Hood enlists in the service of King Edward III at the garrison on the Isle of Wight.

http://deremilitari.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/ayton3.pdf
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on November 21, 2019, 07:52:04 AM
How very interesting.

We used to holiday on the Isle of Wight.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 21, 2019, 08:31:44 AM
Various Louis, kings of France, planned to invade England by landing on Isle of Wight and creating a base.
Have often wondered if this scenario wouldn't make a good game?

"I do not say the French will not come.  I merely say they will not come by sea."  First Sea Lord Earl St. Vincent.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on November 21, 2019, 08:37:52 AM
he wouldn't have lasted long on the IoW - all those ferocious seaside B&B landladies and ice-cream shops would have finished him off.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on November 21, 2019, 08:40:36 AM
 :2funny:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on November 21, 2019, 08:59:56 AM
Various Louis, kings of France, planned to invade England by landing on Isle of Wight and creating a base.
So.... Dragonstone


I do not say the French will not come.  I merely say they will not come by sea."  First Sea Lord Earl St. Vincent.
Wasn't that a reference to the fact that the Scottish were pretty closely linked with the French for a long time in helping them resist English rule?
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 21, 2019, 09:03:43 AM
Yes, you're right.
But it's such a good quote whenever the French think they can win at sea.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 21, 2019, 10:55:23 PM
Fleet Admiral William F Halsey retires, 22 November, 1945.

&t=151s

The Naval Museum in the Washington, DC Navy Yard has the saddle that Halsey promised to use on the emperor's horse in Tokyo.
After the signing of the peace, Halsey went to take a ride through the streets of Tokyo.  The only suitable car was a Packard limousine that was owned by the manager of the Imperial Hotel.  Liking the feel of it, Halsey impounded the vehicle as spoils of war and had it transported to the US.  He drove it to the day he died.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 22, 2019, 08:05:43 AM
Knew there was something else.
Back in the 70s, There were still a lot of older chiefs who had sailed with Halsey in the Pacific.  He was quite the character and if you could get them going, there were lots of quirky stories they would tell.
He got the nickname Bull from his exploits ashore during the Cruise of the Great White Fleet.  He did love the young ladies.
He was extremely superstitious about the Thirteenth of each month, and really got nervous when there was a Friday the Thirteenth.
When he began pilot training, at the age of 52, his wife told their daughter "the old fool is learning to fly."
He was on a familiarisation tour of the South Pacific command and was in a whaleboat approaching Admiral Ghormley's command vessel, when a communications officer handed him a Top Secret order.  Reading that he was to relieve Ghormley and take command, he uttered, "Jesus Christ and General Jackson.  This is the hottest potato they've ever handed me."
At that time, the mandatory retirement age was 60.  Halsey turned 60 in 1942, but was given a special dispensation by President Roosevelt.  Halsey dreaded being relieved due to his age.
During the kamikaze attacks off Okinawa, it was necessary to keep the destroyers topped off in fuel.  Maneuvering at flank speed  increased fuel consumption enormously, so at every opportunity the battleships would fuel them.  (The fleet oilers in the Sea Train, never went into a combat zone.)
At one point, a destroyer was alongside New Jersey., Halsey's flagship, when he stormed out on the bridge wing and yelled across the water, "Sheer off, coxswain.  I've got bandits coming in."
Now, coxswain is the commander of a small rowboat, and was quite an insult to a ship's captain.
The destroyer captain, was furious at this slight.  He turned his back to the New Jersey and let his feelings out, 'That damned old asshat, blankety-blank bollard screwing..."
The captain let his feelings out for a couple of minutes of salty insults; and then noticed his bridge crew all looked concerned.  He turned and the admiral was furiously glaring at him.  By a trick of the air, his tirade carried over and was heard by Halsey.  He scrunched his arms over the bridge railing and looked like he was going to leap across to the destroyer for the dirty implications.
"How DARE you call me old."
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on November 22, 2019, 08:41:11 AM
Good stuff, besilarius.  :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on November 22, 2019, 08:45:21 AM
nice read :)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on November 22, 2019, 08:57:39 AM
 :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on November 22, 2019, 09:41:10 AM
besilarius has become my replacement for The History Channel.  :rockon:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on November 22, 2019, 02:59:11 PM
The Besilarius Channel. On my Favs list.  :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on November 23, 2019, 08:29:38 AM
Thankee, sors, thankee, he said knuckling his brow.

Sorry, but I does love a good sea story.  Hope you enjoy these historical gumdrops.  Now that I've finally got time on my hands, the reading and research is a lot of fun.
It's strange.  Things I read, or heard,  years back, can come back with a small trigger, but ask me what was for lunch yesterday and I'm lost.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on November 23, 2019, 08:35:42 AM
You do find some great stuff - keep up the good work! :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on November 23, 2019, 08:42:56 AM
Agreed. My statement is true. I love reading these historical tidbits and learning things I did not know.  8)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on November 23, 2019, 11:23:48 AM
Like the fact pugs HATE bow ties? Unless they're eating them out of a spaghetti bowl.  :go-on:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on November 30, 2019, 12:05:03 PM
https://twitter.com/airandspace/status/1200821865863929857
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on November 30, 2019, 12:14:37 PM
..8.5 ib?

meteorite?

.....and she was only bruised?

...I wonder where it hit her? (please, don't say Alabama).

maybe she was well padded at the impact point.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on November 30, 2019, 09:03:25 PM
https://twitter.com/URDailyHistory/status/1200957939810353153
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on November 30, 2019, 10:37:34 PM
Quote
The League of Nations later declared the attack illegal and expelled the #USSR from the organization.

and they've been giving zero fucks ever since
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on December 01, 2019, 12:07:12 PM
Puget Sound Navy Museum
· Yesterday ·
 
On this day in 1942, USS New Orleans (CA 32) was hit by a torpedo off Guadalcanal. Her entire bow was torn away.

The ship struggled to stay afloat, and limped back to Guadalcanal for temporary repairs. The fix included a bow fashioned of palm tree logs. After stopping in Sydney, Australia for further repairs, New Orleans made her way to Bremerton. Because of her condition, she had to make the journey while sailing backwards.

By the time she arrived in Bremerton, a new bow had already been built for her using plans from her sister ship, USS Astoria. When New Orleans arrived at the shipyard, it was discovered that the new bow was out of line by just one-eighth of an inch. Soon USS New Orleans was able to return to the fleet.

This photo was taken at the Puget Sound Navy Yard, between the removal of her temporary bow and the installation of the new one.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on December 01, 2019, 01:28:05 PM
Yikes!

And yet, somehow the idea of a ship named after New Orleans limping home backwards after an insane bender and a makeshift wardrobe seems horribly appropriate
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on December 03, 2019, 09:37:58 PM
Yikes!

And yet, somehow the idea of a ship named after New Orleans limping home backwards after an insane bender and a makeshift wardrobe seems horribly appropriate

 ;D

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on December 03, 2019, 11:01:07 PM
After which she was renamed, U.S.S. Stubby.  :hehe:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on December 07, 2019, 09:23:23 PM
78 years ago today...

Back aboard Enterprise, Admiral Halsey had just poured himself a second cup of coffee when his aide dashed into the cabin. “Admiral, there’s an air raid on Pearl!” Halsey’s first thought was that the Army, which had been scheduled to conduct a readiness exercise the week before, was taking things too far. He leapt to his feet, telling his aide to radio Kimmel that the Army was “shooting down my own boys!” A second aide entered with a message direct from Admiral Kimmel: “AIR RAID PEARL HARBOR X THIS IS NO DRILL.”

Officer of the Deck Lieutenant John Dorsett ordered General Quarters. 19-year old Seaman Jim Barnill, one of Enterprise’s four buglers, sounded the staccato notes of “Boots and Saddles.” Twenty-eight year old First Class Bosun’s Mate, Max Lee, played his pipe over the 1MC then called “General Quarters! General Quarters! All hands man your battle stations!” Lee’s enlistment was almost up. After the war, he remembered that he then turned to OOD Dorsett and said “We’re at war and I’ll never get out of the Navy alive.”

Dick Best remembered coming onto the flight deck shortly after general quarters had been called and looking up at the island. “The first thing I saw was the biggest American flag I had ever seen, flying from the masthead and whipping in the wind. It was the most emotional sight of the war for me.”

(Excerpt from: "I Will Run Wild: the Pacific War From Pearl Harbor to Midway" - coming next spring by Thomas Cleaver)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on December 08, 2019, 02:19:28 AM
Great stuff as usual, bes.  Keep it coming!  :bigthumb: 
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on December 08, 2019, 07:43:08 AM
Adjutant General Order #72 abolishes the daily whiskey ration of one gill (four ounces) for the US army, 1832.  Coffee and sugar are to substitute for it.
In 1829, the army bought 72,537 gallons of whiskey.

https://www.rstreet.org/2017/11/17/the-military-and-whiskeys-250-year-old-relationship/
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on December 08, 2019, 08:25:02 PM
For those who are interested in the early Pacific War, Thomas Cleaver (author of Pacific Thunder) is doing a daily posting on Facebook.
Each day, he is recounting what happened on the same date in 1941.
Here is a tidbit on Wake Island

https://www.facebook.com/thomas.cleaver.710/posts/2560583280839564

These will come from his soon to be published, "I will run wild", Pearl Harbor to Midway.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on December 09, 2019, 10:01:43 AM
Nice find  :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on December 14, 2019, 07:57:38 AM
1943         Capt. Henry T. Waskow (25), Co. B., 143rd Infantry, kia, Hill 703, near San Pietro, prompting Ernie Pyle to write the most moving dispatch of World War II.

The Death of Captain Waskow

AT THE FRONT LINES IN ITALY, January 10, 1944 – In this war I have known a lot of officers who were loved and respected by the soldiers under them. But never have I crossed the trail of any man as beloved as Capt. Henry T. Waskow of Belton, Texas.

Capt. Waskow was a company commander in the 36th Division. He had led his company since long before it left the States. He was very young, only in his middle twenties, but he carried in him a sincerity and gentleness that made people want to be guided by him.

"After my own father, he came next," a sergeant told me.

"He always looked after us," a soldier said. "He’d go to bat for us every time."

"I’ve never knowed him to do anything unfair," another one said.

I was at the foot of the mule trail the night they brought Capt. Waskow’s body down. The moon was nearly full at the time, and you could see far up the trail, and even part way across the valley below. Soldiers made shadows in the moonlight as they walked.

Dead men had been coming down the mountain all evening, lashed onto the backs of mules. They came lying belly-down across the wooden pack-saddles, their heads hanging down on the left side of the mule, their stiffened legs sticking out awkwardly from the other side, bobbing up and down as the mule walked.

The Italian mule-skinners were afraid to walk beside dead men, so Americans had to lead the mules down that night. Even the Americans were reluctant to unlash and lift off the bodies at the bottom, so an officer had to do it himself, and ask others to help.

The first one came early in the morning. They slid him down from the mule and stood him on his feet for a moment, while they got a new grip. In the half light he might have been merely a sick man standing there, leaning on the others. Then they laid him on the ground in the shadow of the low stone wall alongside the road.

I don’t know who that first one was. You feel small in the presence of dead men, and ashamed at being alive, and you don’t ask silly questions.

We left him there beside the road, that first one, and we all went back into the cowshed and sat on water cans or lay on the straw, waiting for the next batch of mules.

Somebody said the dead soldier had been dead for four days, and then nobody said anything more about it. We talked soldier talk for an hour or more. The dead man lay all alone outside in the shadow of the low stone wall.

Then a soldier came into the cowshed and said there were some more bodies outside. We went out into the road. Four mules stood there, in the moonlight, in the road where the trail came down off the mountain. The soldiers who led them stood there waiting. "This one is Captain Waskow," one of them said quietly.

Two men unlashed his body from the mule and lifted it off and laid it in the shadow beside the low stone wall. Other men took the other bodies off. Finally there were five lying end to end in a long row, alongside the road. You don’t cover up dead men in the combat zone. They just lie there in the shadows until somebody else comes after them.

The unburdened mules moved off to their olive orchard. The men in the road seemed reluctant to leave. They stood around, and gradually one by one I could sense them moving close to Capt. Waskow’s body. Not so much to look, I think, as to say something in finality to him, and to themselves. I stood close by and I could hear.

One soldier came and looked down, and he said out loud, "God damn it." That’s all he said, and then he walked away. Another one came. He said, "God damn it to hell anyway." He looked down for a few last moments, and then he turned and left.

Another man came; I think he was an officer. It was hard to tell officers from men in the half light, for all were bearded and grimy dirty. The man looked down into the dead captain’s face, and then he spoke directly to him, as though he were alive. He said: "I’m sorry, old man."

Then a soldier came and stood beside the officer, and bent over, and he too spoke to his dead captain, not in a whisper but awfully tenderly, and he said:

"I sure am sorry, sir."

Then the first man squatted down, and he reached down and took the dead hand, and he sat there for a full five minutes, holding the dead hand in his own and looking intently into the dead face, and he never uttered a sound all the time he sat there.

And finally he put the hand down, and then reached up and gently straightened the points of the captain’s shirt collar, and then he sort of rearranged the tattered edges of his uniform around the wound. And then he got up and walked away down the road in the moonlight, all alone.

After that the rest of us went back into the cowshed, leaving the five dead men lying in a line, end to end, in the shadow of the low stone wall. We lay down on the straw in the cowshed, and pretty soon we were all asleep.
Ernie Pyle
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on December 14, 2019, 08:42:54 AM
https://twitter.com/MilHistNow/status/1205736174817611776
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on December 14, 2019, 10:51:18 AM
Napoleon was reported to have said 'goddammit!'
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on December 14, 2019, 11:01:56 AM
But in French.

Obviously.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on December 14, 2019, 11:19:15 AM
Oui.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on December 14, 2019, 11:29:50 AM
Had he been Quebecois it would have sounded liturgical.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on December 14, 2019, 02:32:28 PM
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on December 17, 2019, 05:37:50 AM
https://mobile.twitter.com/URDailyHistory/status/1206877193508245504
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on December 17, 2019, 06:24:59 AM
It still has the power shock.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on December 18, 2019, 10:05:37 AM
On this day in 1944, Typhoon Cobra devastates the Third Fleet in the Pacific.
The destroyers Hull, Spence, and Monaghan capsize with great loss of life, and at least 86 planes are lost offof flight decks.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Typhoon_Cobra

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on December 18, 2019, 12:10:31 PM
https://twitter.com/URDailyHistory/status/1207347039463280640
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on December 22, 2019, 12:19:46 PM
https://twitter.com/URDailyHistory/status/1208796087659556869
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on December 22, 2019, 12:24:29 PM
 :bigthumb: :bigthumb: :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on December 22, 2019, 12:27:17 PM
The Battered Bastards of Bastogne
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on December 22, 2019, 12:33:00 PM
I should be playing either 'Bitter Woods' or 'Ardennes '44'
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on December 22, 2019, 12:34:05 PM
Quite true
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on December 24, 2019, 12:28:06 PM
https://twitter.com/URDailyHistory/status/1209453167118864386
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on December 30, 2019, 12:48:31 PM
https://twitter.com/Battlefields/status/1211704791916859392
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on December 30, 2019, 01:17:14 PM
Tin can on a shingle.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on December 30, 2019, 01:23:16 PM
Tin can on a shingle.

Or "cheesebox on a raft"
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on December 30, 2019, 01:34:12 PM
Tin can on a shingle.

I seem to remember reading somewhere that Lincoln called it this when he first saw it.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on December 30, 2019, 02:05:45 PM
 “You would make a ship sail against the winds and currents by lighting a bonfire under her decks? I have no time for such nonsense.”
― Napoleon Bonaparte
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on December 30, 2019, 02:06:56 PM
Quite right, too.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on December 30, 2019, 07:35:30 PM
A Tin Can with big-ass guns on a shingle. I remember reading somewhere that if the Monitor had shells instead of round cannon balls, she would have sunk the Virginia. Don't know if that's true or not, but possible.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on December 30, 2019, 07:54:10 PM
Because the officials in Washington were frightened of this new technology,. the Monitor fired it's Dahlgren cannon with HALF strength charges of gunpowder. 
Even so, the hits cracked the Virginia's barbette and wrecked much of the internal structure.  Full strength charges would have done much more damage.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on December 31, 2019, 02:41:36 PM
https://twitter.com/airandspace/status/1212093584150794246
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on January 01, 2020, 02:19:45 PM
The Royal Navy burns Norfolk, Va.

Late in 1775 Brig. Gen. William Woodford was campaigning in southeastern Virginia with about a thousand men, mostly from Colonel Robert Howe’s 2nd North Carolina. The American intention was to eject British Governor Lord Dunmore from the Norfolk area. On December 9th, they drove Lord Dunmore’s slender forces – he only had about 200 men – from the town of Norfolk in the Battle of Great Bridge. Dunmore sought refuge aboard some ships of the Royal Navy that were lying offshore. These were shortly reinforced by the 28-gun frigate HMS Liverpool, commanded by Captain Henry Bellew.

On Christmas Eve, Captain Bellow sent a party ashore under a flag of truce, requesting fresh provisions for his ships. As the British ships were quite powerful, and the American forces quite weak, the request put Woodford and Howe in a quandary; as they didn’t want to provoke an attack, yet they also didn’t want to provide supplies to the enemy. They resolved the problem in a rather solomonic fashion; they refused to provide fresh provisions for the British squadron, but supplied Bellew with various delicacies for his personal table.

Of course, hostilities could at best only be postponed. On December 29th, Bellew sent Howe a courteous letter. After the usual opening pleasantries, Bellew noted that although he much preferred avoiding so unpleasant a task, “the honor of my commission” required that he undertake an attack, because it was his duty to suppress armed rebellion against the Crown.

In an equally courteous reply, Colonel Howe noted that his high regard for Bellew’s honor naturally prevented him from asking that the attack be called off, but allowed as how Bellow would naturally understand that he would “be unworthy of the respect of a man of your character” if he did not, of course, resist the attack.

The attack came on January 1, 1776. Covered by the guns of HMS Liverpool and the other ships, Bellew landed a strong party of sailors, marines, and soldiers. Although unable to seize Norfolk, the British managed to torch the town before retiring on their ships. A few days later Lord Dunmore, Captain Bellew, and the rest of the British force sailed away.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on January 07, 2020, 09:15:58 AM
1762.  The English cabinet gives the order that results in The sack of Havana.
"Ow, the Loot! Bloomin' Loot!"

Looting is an ancient military tradition. Of course most modern armies - at least those of major powers - frown upon the practice. So while some informal plundering does still occur, there is nothing like the organized distribution of goodies which once was a normal consequence of victory. Navies, which had less of an opportunity for plunder than armies, formalized the distribution of "prize" to a remarkable degree. As David Dixon Porter, America's second admiral put it "Armies loot, navies take prize."

One of the most impressive hauls ever made was a result of the British capture of Havana during the Seven Years' War.

In early 1762 the British government decided to seize Havana from Spain. To accomplish this feat a fleet of 26 ships-of-the-line, 15 frigates, a number of smaller warships, and 150 merchantmen, was fitted out, manned by 27,000 seamen and troops, under the command of Lord Albemarle. The expedition sailed from England in March. D-Day was on June 6th, and the landings achieved complete surprise. By June 20th, Albemarle had invested the city. The siege lasted 40 days, as the outnumbered defenders put up a lively resistance. As always, disease inflicted greater losses than did combat. However, having mastery of the seas, the British were able to bring in volunteer reinforcements from the colonies in North America and Jamaica. Finally, on August 13th the city surrendered. Now came the good part.

The amount of booty was enormous - even including a dozen ships-of-the-line. All the booty was all meticulously calculated and then divided up among the participants according to a complex formula. The results of "divvying up the loot" can be seen below.
Prize Awarded
Naval Personnel                           Army Personnel
Admiral-in-Chief   £122,697   General-in-Chief   £122,697
Commodores   24,539            Lieutenants-Generals   24,539
Captains   1,600                   Major Generals   6,816
Lieutenants   234                           Field Officers   564
Warrant Officers   118                   Captains   184
Petty Officers   17 5s                   Subalterns   116
Common Seamen   3 14s 9d   Sergeants   8 18s 8d
Boys   1 5s 3d                           Corporals   6 16s 6d
                                                        Other Ranks   4 1s 8d

Trying to estimate how much all this loot was actually worth is rather difficult, though not impossible. On paper, in 2001 the pound is worth about 30 times what it was worth back in 1762. So a common seaman's take would be about a hundred pounds in modern money. But that's barely $150, mere chump change. In fact, none of the purported systems of converting money from earlier times to that of the present - including the Consumer Price Index - works very well, due to changes in the cost, quality, and type of goods we buy, as well as changing standards of living and occupation.

Consider it another way.

In the mid-eighteenth century a private in the British Army was paid a bit more than £18 a year ("A shilling a day, bloomin' good pay."), though various deductions were made from this for uniform allowances and such, which actually left him with £7, 7s, and 7d. Still, £18 is just a little short of the £20 and one penny that Charles Dickens seems to have considered adequate to support a small family with lower middle class pretensions.

Officers of course, did a lot better. Depending upon rank, their shares of the booty were often greater by several degrees of magnitude than their regular salaries. So both enlisted men and officers had considerable incentive to go on campaign.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on January 08, 2020, 11:15:12 AM
https://twitter.com/URDailyHistory/status/1214942085050195969
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on January 08, 2020, 11:46:31 PM
Badass.  :2thumbs: 
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on January 09, 2020, 08:43:04 AM
Badass.  :2thumbs:

Yeah. There's a hero for you.  :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on January 12, 2020, 12:39:36 PM
In 1500, Cesare Borgia captures the fortress of Forli.
Caterina Sforza, a most formidable woman, is captured while still wielding her weapons.,
At one time, she held Castel St. Angelo in Rome, and used her artillery to keep the College of Cardinals from electing a new Pope.  She was seven months pregnant at the time.
Later she faced a conspiracy to seize her lands:
The fortress of Ravaldino, a central part of the defensive system of the city,[22] refused to surrender to the Orsis. Caterina offered to attempt to persuade the castellan, Tommaso Feo, to submit. The Orsis believed Caterina because she left her children as hostages, but once inside she let loose a barrage of vulgar threats and promises of vengeance against her former captors. According to one rumour, when they threatened to kill her children, Caterina, standing in the walls of the fortress exposed her genitals and said: "Fatelo, se volete: impiccateli pure davanti a me ... qui ho quanto basta per farne altri!" ('Do it, if you want to: hang them even in front of me ... here I have what's needed to make others!').[23] This story, however, is most likely an untrue embellishment. The historical record tells that Caterina, in fact, claimed to be pregnant. Although her statement that she was pregnant is, by most historians, considered to have been a ruse, it rendered worthless any power the conspirators had in holding her children, Girolamo's legitimate heirs.
Think of her as a determined noble lord, defending her holdings.  Something like eleanor of Aquitaine in the Lion in Winter.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on January 13, 2020, 01:36:33 AM
Yeah, sounds like she was one hell of a woman -- in the best of ways.  :bigthumb: 
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on January 14, 2020, 07:56:39 AM
Robert Cornelis Napier, Field Marshal Baron Napier of Magdala, dies at age 79


"Nothing to Report"

One night around 1880, while the old Victorian war horse Lord Napier of Magdala was serving as Governor of Gibraltar, an officer who had taken on board too much champagne lost his way trying to get back to his quarters, walked off the Rock, and fell to his death.  The following morning, having read the report of the officer of the day, a Lt. O'Donohue, Napier summoned that worthy to his office.

When O'Donohue arrived, Napier asked, "You were officer of the guard at the Elphinstone Guard yesterday?

"I was, sir."

"Lieutenant M____ was killed by walking over the rock."

"He was, sir."

"And yet you said in your report that nothing extraordinary had happened on your guard?"

"I did, sir."

"Well, Mr. O'Donohue, don't you think it extraordinary that a lieutenant walks over the rock, falls one thousand feet, and is killed?"

"Indeed, sir," came the swift reply, "I would think it a good deal more extraordinary if he had fallen that distance and not been killed!"

 
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on January 14, 2020, 08:44:30 AM
The LT's logic is infallible
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on January 14, 2020, 10:05:50 AM
See, Champagne kills. That's why I never drink it. Except at weddings and funerals of people I really like.  :biggrin:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on January 15, 2020, 07:31:04 AM
50 years ago today, Biafra surrendered

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-51094093
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on January 15, 2020, 10:40:01 AM
I remember that happening. A terrible war.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on January 15, 2020, 02:05:03 PM
^Yes, it was pretty grim, even for that period in Africa.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on January 16, 2020, 08:13:59 AM
The Navy held major exercises called Fleet Problems.  Fleet Problem III was held in 1924 and wargamed out a war in which the Atlantic Battle Force used the Panama Canal to deploy to the Pacific.



UNITED STATES FLEET
The Scouting Fleet
U.S.S. Wyoming, Flagship

Colon, P.R.
13 January, I924.

From: Ensign T. H. Hederman, U. S. Navy
To: Lieutenant Hamilton Bryan, U.S. Navy, Fleet Intelligence Officer.

Subject: Operations as a spy in Canal Zone, report on.

1. In compliance with Commander SCOUTING FLEET’s order I left the U.S.S. Wyoming on l5 January 1324, proceeded to the U.S.. Richmond, and hoisted on board a sloop, 15 feet overall, 6 foot beam, the property of a native of Bocas del Toro, who was also present. The Richmond proceeded to a point 20 miles northeast of Toro Point Light where we took off, reaching Colon at 1000, 16 January, 1924.

2. At the Hotel Astor I shifted into the uniform of an enlisted man carrying my officer's uniform with me. I then proceeded to Miraflores Locks and received information concerning the passage of ships through the canal.

3. The first battleship to go though was the U.S.S. California at 1600. In devising a scheme to board her, I found it very impracticable due to the possibility of recognition by my classmates on deck at the time. Therefore I waited for the second battleship in line which was the U.S.S. New York. As she lay in the lower lift of the Miraflores Locks I threw my package containing the officer’s uniform on deck, proving that the conveyance of any package on board was possible. I then climbed hand over hand to the main deck up a fender line.

4. I remained on board over night in the capacity of an enlisted man. On 1? January 1924 at 0840, I shifted into may officer's uniform in a trunk outside of No. 3 Handling Room. I then sent for the Magazine Gunner's Mate. At 0810 the Ordnance Gunner appeared and upon my informing him that I was making a Fleet inspection of powder, he opened up a magazine (G-35P) and also a can of powder. In my left hard I carried the wrapping paper concealed in my handkerchief which might have been a detonator charge. At this time the ship was approaching Culebra Cut and a five minute fuse would have exploded the charge as the ship passed through the Cut.

5. I then reported my act to the Commander of Battleship Division Three who made me a prisoner of war under sentry's charge and to be treated as such.

6. I was released from strict confinement, at 1100, 18 January 1924, and given parole aboard the ship. I was released as a prisoner of war at 1000, 19 January, 1924.

T. H. Hederman.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on January 16, 2020, 08:16:22 AM
50 years ago today, Biafra surrendered

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-51094093 (https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-51094093)


It was his experience as a war correspondent during this war that gave Forsythe the background info he used in writing The Dogs of War
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on January 18, 2020, 08:24:31 AM
"One of Our Admirals did What?"

On October 1, 1943, Allied troops entered Naples. The Germans had clung fiercely to the city, battling Italian partisans for days while trying to destroy its extensive harbor facitilities. As a result, there was much devastation. Food, water, medical supplies were all scarce, there were thousands of wounded civilians. Allied civil affairs personnel attempted to cope with problem, but were themselves beset by a shortage of resources.

The Prince of Caracciolo, scion of one of the noblest Italian families and head of the Italian Red Cross, knew of the location of extensive stocks of food, medicines, and other supplies that had been kept hidden from the Germans. But when he approached the Allied occupation authorities, he got nowhere; everyone either ignored him or fobbed him off on someone else, and his polite attempts to submit a written proposal explaining his purpose were ignored..

Finally the Prince hit upon a clever idea. He penned a note to the senior British naval officer in the city, which included the lines, “One of your admirals hanged one of my relatives. I demand an immeidate meeting.”

One can immagine the consternation this caused. Within a very short time the prince was ushered into the British admiral’s office. Before anyone could speak, the Prince said, “I am the head of the Italian Red Cross in Naples, and have access to large stocks of food and medical supplies.”

Taken aback, the British admiral, said, “But what about this relative you say was hanged by one of our admirals?”

“Oh,” replied the Prince, “that was my kinsman Admiral Francesco Caracciolo, who was hanged by your Admiral Nelson in 1799.”

Prince Francesco Maria Caracciolo was born on this date in 1752.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on January 18, 2020, 09:17:46 AM
that's a great one :)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on January 18, 2020, 11:19:58 AM
 :applause:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on January 18, 2020, 10:26:50 PM
 :ROFL:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on January 19, 2020, 08:23:42 AM
On this date in 1915,  Germany begin Zeppelin raids on Great Britain, bombing Great Yarmouth & King's Lynn, c. 20 die

From January of 1915 through July of 1917, Germany conducted numerous air raids on British cities using rigid airships – Zeppelins.

This was hazardous duty, for Zeppelins full of hydrogen were liable to burn at the slightest spark, which could be provided by British fighters or anti-aircraft guns or just friction, and the airships were often at the mercy of the winds as well. So casualties were high. In the course of the war Germany deployed 117 Zeppelins, including ships that were not used to raid Britain. Of these, 39 were shot down by Allied ground fire or airplanes and another 42 lost to due to the weather or to accidents, or were just never heard from again.

A raid on England on October 19, 1917 was perhaps typical. The eleven attacking zeppelins dropped 275 bombs, which caused the deaths of 36 people. But five of the airships failed to return, though only one was lost to enemy action.

Despite these heavy losses, the morale of the Kaiser’s airshipmen remained high throughout the war. Indeed, it was so high that many of the men, already volunteers for hazardous duty, would eagerly volunteer for the even more hazardous duty of serving as observers.

Since navigation was often uncertain when Zeppelins were flying above clouds, some were equipped with an observation basket that could be lowered through the cloud layers. In that way one or two men in the basket would have a good view of the earth’s surface. From this position, they could keep the ship informed by telephone of the landmarks below, helping it navigate to and from its target.

Of course this was particularly hazardous, as the men were without parachutes in a flimsy basket dangling at the end of a 750 meter tether, in freezing cold. Yet there never seems to have been a shortage of volunteers for this duty. In part this was due to the very high morale of the airshipmen. But volunteers also gained a privilege denied to everyone else on the ship; the little basket dangling at the end of nearly a half-mile of cable was the only place on the airship where a man was allowed to have a cigarette.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on January 19, 2020, 09:27:10 PM
Interesting stuff.  I knew Germany employed zeppelins in WW1, but not that extensively. 
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on January 19, 2020, 10:35:16 PM
Interesting stuff.  I knew Germany employed zeppelins in WW1, but not that extensively.


Reports of their effectiveness were highly over inflated
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on January 19, 2020, 11:33:36 PM
Right, they were blown up out of proportion. And sometimes just blown up.  :hehe:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on January 21, 2020, 07:44:43 PM
On this date, Alfonso II of Naples (1494-1495) abdicates in favor of his son Ferrante II (1495-1496)

In 1493, although only 24, Charles VIII had been on the throne of France for 10 years. That year, he decided to assert a dubious claim to the throne of Naples. Naples had been in dispute between the house of Aragon and the house of Anjou for some two centuries. In 1442 King Alfonso V of Aragon had deposed Charles’ uncle, Rene “the Good,” and set himself up as Alfonso I of Naples. This passed to his illegitimate son Ferrante I in 1458. By 1493 Ferrante was ill, and the Neapolitan barons, long unhappy with Aragonese efforts to curb their power in the interests of national unity, were encouraging Charles to step in. By the time Ferrante died, in January of 1494, leaving the throne to his son, Alfonso II, Charles was already preparing an invasion of Italy.

Now at the time, France had the best army in the world, essentially the first professional standing army in Western Europe since the fall of Rome. So when Charles invaded Italy in a surprise late-season campaign in September of 1494 with 18,000 troops, including French men-at-arms, Swiss pikemen, and a train of 40 cannon, his army proved remarkably effective. With the finest artillery train in the west, great fortified cities fell so easily into his power, that in short order places began surrendering as soon as Charles’ gunners set up their pieces. By December, the French had occupied Rome, forcing Pope Alexander VI, hardly the finest occupant of the See of Peter, to concede his claim to Naples, which was technically a papal fief.

From Rome, Charles launched an unprecedented winter campaign, invading Naples on two fronts with an army swollen to 40,000 by alliances with various Italian princes.

At this point, Alfonso, an artistically-inclined prince of no great intelligence, abdicated and passed the throne to his son, Ferrante II. Ferrante, although already a proven campaigner despite his age, only 25, could put up little resistance, faced with an empty treasury, an invading army, and unreliable barons, and so fled to Sicily, where his cousin Ferdinand II (as in “Ferdinand and Isabella”), reigned. While Ferrante and Ferdinand concentrated an army in Sicily, Charles captured Naples itself on February 20, 1495, and soon was in control of most of the kingdom.

Believing his work done, within weeks Charles marched back to France. Italian efforts to interfere in his retirement led to a spectacular French victory at the Taro, in Tuscany, on July 6, 1495. Oddly, this victory came just a few days before Charles received word that an Aragonese-Neapolitan army landed from Sicily had liberated Naples on July 7th. Despite news of this reverse, Charles continued on his way, returning to France.

So in the end, Charles gained nothing from his campaign.

Well, not quite.

He did manage to keep one “conquest.” While fleeing Naples, Ferrante had neglected to take along his mistress, Caterina Gonzaga. Applying the ancient maxim, “To the victor belong the spoils, Charles promptly made the young woman his mistress.

But Charles didn’t get to enjoy even that little bit of his victory for very long. Early in April of 1498, Charles accidentally bunked his head against a stone door lintel, and died of a concussion on the 7th.

The only lasting legacy of Charles’ invasion of Italy was to initiate over a generational conflict between France and Spain for control of the peninsula that would last more than 60 years (1494-1559), and end in complete Spanish dominance
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on January 22, 2020, 08:24:37 AM
1879, the twin battles of Isandlhwana and Rorke's Drift.

https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/features/the-untold-story-of-the-film-zulu-starring-michael-caine-50-years-on-9069558.html
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on January 22, 2020, 01:39:26 PM
https://twitter.com/18airbornecorps/status/1219977367675965440
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on January 26, 2020, 03:19:57 PM
https://twitter.com/WWIIpix/status/1221361187822108672
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on January 26, 2020, 03:41:53 PM
He was almost ridiculously badass. 
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on January 26, 2020, 04:56:58 PM
Audie was a very boyish, quite short individual.  On being introduced to John Wayne, Wayne refused to believe that this "little kid" could have been any kind of a war hero.
One story was that Audie had a very large auto, like a Buick or Caddy.  He looked like a kid who had stolen his parent's car for a joyride.
He was driving down Hollywood Blvd and had a fender bender.
The other car had two guys who were muscle builders.  They started pushing Audie around.
He took it for a moment.  Then, according to an eye witness, "he just seemed to explode into them."
By the time the police arrived, one guy was out cold with a broken arm.  Audie was kneeling on the other fellow's shoulders and pounding him into the cement.  A policeman had to pull him off the guy.
The police couldn't believe "this little shrimp" could have taken out the two muscle jocks.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on January 26, 2020, 11:03:00 PM
And he made a reasonably good actor too. Better than many of his contemporary fellow actors anyway. I remember hearing about him being killed the day it happened.  :'(
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: judgedredd on January 27, 2020, 05:34:56 AM
When I was in HM Forces training on exercise and we were walking along on patrol and your arm was sore so you rested the rifle down by your hip as opposed to having the butt of the rifle in the shoulder where it should be, we were always being told "Hold the rifle up to your shoulder...who do you think you are? Audie f***ing Murphy?"

I had no idea who he was back then.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on January 27, 2020, 11:42:48 AM
One of his old movies was on TV one day when my daughter and Son-In-Law were over and when I explained to them who this guy was, the most decorated soldier in U.S. History, they just looked at me like I was an alien that had just landed in their front yard.  :sigh:  I felt like telling them, 'You'll be back when your kids have to learn about in school'. But, they probably don't teach stuff like that anymore.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on January 28, 2020, 06:15:11 AM
(OK, this was yesterday in history)

Quote
Character and Courage—Here’s a story from 75 years ago today that you likely haven't heard before. It led to this man being the first and only American soldier to be declared “Righteous Among the Nations.” This title is the highest honor Israel confers on non-Jews who risked their lives to save Jews during the Holocaust.
US Army Master Sergeant Roddie Edmonds, 422nd Infantry Regiment, 106th Infantry Division, was captured by Nazi forces at the onset of the Battle of the Bulge. A native of Knoxville, TN, Edmonds was 25 years old. He had only been on the front line for five days when his unit was overrun.

Edmonds' captors sent him east to a holding camp before they eventually transferred him to Stalag IX-A, just east of Bonn, Germany. The camp was designated solely for enlisted personnel. As the senior noncommissioned officer at the camp, Edmonds found himself responsible for 1,275 American POWs.

On January 27, 1945, the first day for the prisoners at Stalag IX-A, the Nazi commandant ordered Edmonds to assemble all the Jewish-American soldiers so they could be separated from the other prisoners. Instead, Edmonds assembled all 1,275 American POWs.

Furious, the German commandant rushed up to Edmonds, placed a pistol against Edmonds' head and demanded that he identify the Jewish soldiers within the ranks.

Edmonds, a Baptist, responded, "We are all Jews here."

Edmonds then warned the commandant that if he wanted to shoot the Jews, he'd have to shoot everyone, and that if he harmed any of Edmonds' men, the commandant would be prosecuted for war crimes when the Nazis lost. Edmonds then recited that the Geneva Conventions required POWs to give only their name, rank, and serial number, NOT their religion.

The commandant backed down.

Edmonds' actions are credited with saving up to 200 Jewish-American soldiers from likely execution. He survived 100 days of captivity, and returned home after the war, but kept the event at the POW camp to himself. He served again in Korea.

It was only after Edmonds’ death in 1985 and the review of his diaries by his son that his story came to light. Jewish-American POWs, including NBC television executive Sonny Fox, verified the story as did other POWs who were glad to share. The State of Israel declared Edmonds “Righteous Among the Nations” in 2015.

Today is Holocaust Remembrance Day. As we pause to remember the 6 million Jews and 11 million others murdered at the hand of their Nazi captors, we also commend our Veterans who helped bring the Nazi tyranny to an end. Master Sergeant Edmonds and the 1,275 American soldiers who stood defiantly with him were a part of that story. It is because of men of character and courage like Master Sergeant Edmonds that we live in the free world we do today.

Photo courtesy of Yad Vashem: World Holocaust Center, Jerusalem, Israel #WeRemember
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on January 28, 2020, 06:17:17 AM
 :applause: Well done, Master Sergeant Roddie Edmonds.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on January 28, 2020, 09:34:35 AM
Agreed!  :notworthy:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on January 28, 2020, 01:33:24 PM
https://twitter.com/URDailyHistory/status/1222225577832255489
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on January 28, 2020, 07:06:36 PM
 :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on January 28, 2020, 10:37:06 PM
(OK, this was yesterday in history)

Quote
Character and Courage—Here’s a story from 75 years ago today that you likely haven't heard before. It led to this man being the first and only American soldier to be declared “Righteous Among the Nations.” This title is the highest honor Israel confers on non-Jews who risked their lives to save Jews during the Holocaust.
US Army Master Sergeant Roddie Edmonds, 422nd Infantry Regiment, 106th Infantry Division, was captured by Nazi forces at the onset of the Battle of the Bulge. A native of Knoxville, TN, Edmonds was 25 years old. He had only been on the front line for five days when his unit was overrun.

Edmonds' captors sent him east to a holding camp before they eventually transferred him to Stalag IX-A, just east of Bonn, Germany. The camp was designated solely for enlisted personnel. As the senior noncommissioned officer at the camp, Edmonds found himself responsible for 1,275 American POWs.

On January 27, 1945, the first day for the prisoners at Stalag IX-A, the Nazi commandant ordered Edmonds to assemble all the Jewish-American soldiers so they could be separated from the other prisoners. Instead, Edmonds assembled all 1,275 American POWs.

Furious, the German commandant rushed up to Edmonds, placed a pistol against Edmonds' head and demanded that he identify the Jewish soldiers within the ranks.

Edmonds, a Baptist, responded, "We are all Jews here."

Edmonds then warned the commandant that if he wanted to shoot the Jews, he'd have to shoot everyone, and that if he harmed any of Edmonds' men, the commandant would be prosecuted for war crimes when the Nazis lost. Edmonds then recited that the Geneva Conventions required POWs to give only their name, rank, and serial number, NOT their religion.

The commandant backed down.

Edmonds' actions are credited with saving up to 200 Jewish-American soldiers from likely execution. He survived 100 days of captivity, and returned home after the war, but kept the event at the POW camp to himself. He served again in Korea.

It was only after Edmonds’ death in 1985 and the review of his diaries by his son that his story came to light. Jewish-American POWs, including NBC television executive Sonny Fox, verified the story as did other POWs who were glad to share. The State of Israel declared Edmonds “Righteous Among the Nations” in 2015.

Today is Holocaust Remembrance Day. As we pause to remember the 6 million Jews and 11 million others murdered at the hand of their Nazi captors, we also commend our Veterans who helped bring the Nazi tyranny to an end. Master Sergeant Edmonds and the 1,275 American soldiers who stood defiantly with him were a part of that story. It is because of men of character and courage like Master Sergeant Edmonds that we live in the free world we do today.

Photo courtesy of Yad Vashem: World Holocaust Center, Jerusalem, Israel #WeRemember

Reading that brought tears to my eyes.  Gods bless him. 




https://twitter.com/URDailyHistory/status/1222225577832255489

Excellent.  8) 
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: judgedredd on January 29, 2020, 01:26:57 AM
Lego!!! Damn I spent years building crap from my mind.

Of course it went all "dumbed down" and took the imagination away by selling sets that actually made stuff...sod the creativity.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on January 29, 2020, 08:58:17 AM
Victor Mature, born this day in 1913.

Victor Mature, a rising young actor in the early 1940s, answered his Uncle Sam’s call during World War II, and then went back to work, becoming a perennial star in numerous “sword and sandal” epics well into the 1950s. One of these was Demetrius and the Gladiators

Though set in Rome in the mid-First Century, the film was made in California. One day, Mature practicing his gladiatorial routine for long hours in the arena, under a hot sun. Finally, the director called it a day.

Mature immediately did what any right-thinking gladiator would himself have done under similar circumstances. Without bothering to doff his gladiatorial togs, he jumped into his car and drove over to the nearest bar in search of a cold one. Needless to say, walking into the establishment while still wearing his cape, cuirass, and greaves, to plop down onto a barstool caused a bit of stir. After several minutes of being gawked at by the stunned bartender, Mature finally piped up, "Whasamatter? Don't you serve servicemen here?"
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on January 30, 2020, 08:55:17 AM
1897         Theodore Roosevelt gives cousin Franklin, Mahan's "The Influence of Sea Power Upon History" for his 15th birthday
1898         Theodore Roosevelt gives cousin Franklin, Mahan's "The Interest of America in Sea Power" for his 16th birthday
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on January 30, 2020, 12:39:30 PM
And for the 17th, he gave him an Armored Cruiser.  :biggrin:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on January 30, 2020, 01:15:28 PM
https://twitter.com/landofthe80/status/1222944592615694337
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on January 30, 2020, 01:53:29 PM
Daaaaaaaamn. 90. Wow.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on January 30, 2020, 02:05:59 PM
We all have our little faults. Mine's in California.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on January 30, 2020, 03:34:03 PM
Loved him as the bad guy in Unforgiven. And so many more. Happy BD Gene.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on January 30, 2020, 04:00:08 PM
Popeye Doyle for sure.  The Polish general in A Bridge Too Far was good.  I actually enjoyed Heist. I thought he was miscast as Lex Luthor, but still enjoyable
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on January 30, 2020, 04:03:41 PM
I thought he was miscast as Lex Luthor, but still enjoyable

He's no Jesse Eisenberg
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on January 30, 2020, 04:08:52 PM
https://twitter.com/URDailyHistory/status/1222989109158797312
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on January 30, 2020, 05:30:22 PM
I thought he was miscast as Lex Luthor, but still enjoyable

He's no Jesse Eisenberg

 :ROFL: :ROFL: :ROFL:

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on January 30, 2020, 11:38:36 PM
Popeye Doyle for sure.  The Polish general in A Bridge Too Far was good.  I actually enjoyed Heist. I thought he was miscast as Lex Luthor, but still enjoyable


There's always Jimmy McGinty
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on February 01, 2020, 08:10:41 AM
https://twitter.com/landofthe80/status/1223592596058054662
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on February 03, 2020, 09:09:36 AM
Sinking of the transport Dorchester.
Once well known by all Americans, the story of the Four Chaplains is one of the most dramatic and moving of World War II, as four men of God, of different faiths but with one cause, gave up their lives to save others, to die side-by-side in prayer.

Very early on the morning of February 3, 1943, the Europe-bound army transport Dorchester, with 869 souls aboard, was steaming through the frigid waters of the Davis Strait, just 20 miles off Greenland. At 0:55 a.m. the German submarine U-223 put a torpedo into her. Struck amidships, slightly aft on her starboard side, in her engine spaces, the ship lost power and began going down. “Abandon Ship!” was ordered. Only two of the ship’s lifeboats could be launched. Panic developed, for many of the troops aboard had disobeyed orders to sleep in their life jackets.

Amid the chaos and fear four men stood out as pillars of strength, four men of God, of different faiths but united in their devotion to their fellow man. The four distributed life jackets and helped men over the side, frequently having to coax, encourage, and even shove the faint hearted. Towards the end each gave his own life jacket to help frightened young soldiers who had none, by some accounts one of them saying, “Take this, my son, you need it more than I do.” As the ship went down they were seen standing together in prayer, by some accounts holding hands. It was just 25 minutes after the torpedo had hit. Only 228 of the men aboard Dorchester survived. Many had gone down with the ship, many others perished in the icy waters. No one knows how many survived because of the heroism and self-sacrifice of the “Four Chaplains.”



    George Fox (1900-1943), a native of Pennsylvania, lied about his age in 1917 to enlist in the Army, serving in the Ambulance Corps at St. Mihiel and in the Meuse-Argonne, where he was wounded, leaving him partially disabled. After the war he attended seminary, became an itinerant Methodist minister, married, and became pastor of a church in Vermont. Shortly after Pearl Harbor Fox decided to become a military chaplain. His son saw combat with the Marines Corps in the Pacific.

    Alexander Goode (1911-1943) was born in Brooklyn, but his family lived for a time in Washington, D.C., before settling in York, Pennsylvania. The young man was active in his synagogue and in B’nai B’rith. During the 1930s he married and had several children, became a rabbi, and pursued an academic career. He joined the Army as a chaplain in early 1942.

    Clark V. Poling (1910-1943), a native of Ohio, was the son of a prominent Reform clergyman and religious publisher. The younger Poling naturally gravitated to the ministry, attending Yale Divinity School. He served in several churches during the 1930s, married, and became pastor of a church in upstate New York. He joined the Chaplains’ Corps shortly after Pearl Harbor.

    John P. Washington (1908-1943) was born into a working class Irish-American family in a tough section of Newark, New Jersey. An outstanding athlete, after college, he entered seminary, and in 1935 was ordained a Roman Catholic priest. He worked in various parishes before joining the Army as a chaplain in early 1942.

The men were nominated for the Medal of Honor, but at the time Army regulations limited that honor to deeds committed in direct combat with the enemy (at least one award has since been made contrary to this rule), and they were instead each awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, second highest decoration in the service. The heroic sacrifice of the four chaplains greatly moved the American people, who took it as symbolic of the very meaning of America, and as an outstanding example of interfaith cooperation.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on February 03, 2020, 09:26:16 AM
Great story! Thanks for the post.  :applause:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on February 03, 2020, 09:38:31 AM
Great story! Thanks for the post.  :applause:


+4
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on February 03, 2020, 03:30:25 PM
I see what you did there.  8)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on February 03, 2020, 10:24:44 PM
Another amazing (and moving) story I'd not heard before.  Thanks for sharing, besilarius
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on February 04, 2020, 08:26:20 AM
1779.  John Paul Jones takes command of Bonhomme Richard
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on February 04, 2020, 10:34:30 AM
Which they promptly renamed, " Hommie Mc Boat-Face".  :nope:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on February 05, 2020, 07:31:17 PM
https://twitter.com/URDailyHistory/status/1225214774276956165
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on February 06, 2020, 07:23:59 AM
On February 6, 1952, after a long illness, King George VI of Great Britain and Northern Ireland dies in his sleep at the royal estate at Sandringham. Princess Elizabeth, the oldest of the king’s two daughters and next in line to succeed him, was in Kenya at the time of her father’s death; she was crowned Queen Elizabeth II on June 2, 1953, at age 27.

https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on February 06, 2020, 07:38:34 AM
God Bless Her.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on February 06, 2020, 01:23:57 PM
God Bless Her.

+1000
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on February 06, 2020, 01:29:25 PM
The Crown is a great Netflix series. :)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Barthheart on February 06, 2020, 01:34:38 PM
The Crown is a great Netflix series. :)

Yes it is... but too slow between seasons...
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on February 06, 2020, 02:09:57 PM
Agreed.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on February 09, 2020, 11:51:40 AM
A very auspicious date.
On this date. Artemis and Apollo are born to Zeus and Leto.

Spanish admiral, the Marquis de Santa Cruz dies of overwork, putting together the Spanish Amada.  (After which king Philip appointed the wealthiest man in Spain, an orange grower, to admital of the Armada.)

Jefferson Davis is elected President of the Confederate States of America.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on February 11, 2020, 08:02:35 AM
1851, the Younger Brother of Jesus Christ begins the Taiping Rebellion.  Perhaps 50 million perish before it is put down in1864.

Lingchi, death by slow slicing, was a preferred form of execution inflicted on rebel leaders.  (Hint, hint, Brant.)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on February 11, 2020, 11:09:30 AM
https://twitter.com/MilHistNow/status/1227202119372918784
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on February 11, 2020, 12:30:25 PM
A smart move.  :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on February 11, 2020, 01:25:35 PM
What an excellent aircraft the P-38 was.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on February 11, 2020, 04:12:29 PM
I don't blame them for being dubious at first sight. What an odd-looking bird! It looks like a Square with an airplane built around it.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on February 11, 2020, 04:15:13 PM
What an odd-looking bird!

Much more normal than say the F-82 Twin Mustang.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on February 11, 2020, 04:21:20 PM
Yes, I agree. I'm not too sure what the idea was behind the twin Mustang. I can't imagine that it was any more manoeuvrable.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on February 11, 2020, 04:30:38 PM
Yes, I agree. I'm not too sure what the idea was behind the twin Mustang. I can't imagine that it was any more manoeuvrable.

Very long range for escort missions.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on February 11, 2020, 04:42:32 PM
Oh aye, I see that, and the advantage of having two pilots for long flights - but was it any better or longer ranged than the P-38, and, was it any more manoeuvrable in combat?
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on February 11, 2020, 04:46:55 PM
Oh aye, I see that, and the advantage of having two pilots for long flights - but was it any better or longer ranged than the P-38, and, was it any more manoeuvrable in combat?

It was definitely longer ranged.

Quote
The F-82E had a range of over 1,400 mi (2,300 km), which meant that with external fuel tanks it could fly from London to Moscow, loiter for 30 minutes over the target, and return, the only American fighter which could do so.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_American_F-82_Twin_Mustang
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on February 11, 2020, 05:01:41 PM
Yeah, that is quite a range with drop tanks fitted.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on February 12, 2020, 10:04:37 PM
https://twitter.com/MilHistNow/status/1227565765496393729
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on February 12, 2020, 10:19:20 PM
https://twitter.com/MilHistNow/status/1227565765496393729

 :'(
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on February 13, 2020, 06:20:52 AM
Such a sad thing - it looked amazing.  The concept of launching and recovering aircraft from it is fantastic.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on February 13, 2020, 06:32:29 AM
I wonder if the same concept could be used nowadays to deploy drone swarms for things like surveys or maybe SAR in inhospitable territory.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on February 13, 2020, 06:34:53 AM
Maybe so with computer guidance technology and modern airship concepts. The thing that gets me it the guts of the guys flying the aircraft and aiming for the hook gadget they used for recovery. Mind you, things were a wee bit slower then I guess.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on February 13, 2020, 07:32:01 AM
Maybe so with computer guidance technology and modern airship concepts. The thing that gets me it the guts of the guys flying the aircraft and aiming for the hook gadget they used for recovery. Mind you, things were a wee bit slower then I guess.

Speaking of guts- I know I've mentioned it a few times already but it bears remembering that eventually the landing gear was removed from the sparrow hawk scout fighters to increase speed and range. After all, since the ZRS airships were designed to operate far out at sea, where were the pilots going to land anyway?
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on February 13, 2020, 07:44:35 AM
Wow! I didn't know that.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on February 13, 2020, 11:35:11 AM
This all reminded me of an 80s era Popular Mechanics article about airports in the sky...aircraft would dock with them in flight and they'd serve as way stations in the sky. All total fantasy but still interesting.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on February 13, 2020, 01:24:55 PM
You would need some rather large balloons for that :-)

...blimey,,back to Samantha Fox again...............
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on February 13, 2020, 05:14:34 PM
Well, Bawb, as Gunny Rudy used   to say, better to have mind in gutter than foot.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on February 14, 2020, 07:06:41 AM
A good sig line if ever I heard one  :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on February 14, 2020, 08:50:48 AM
Getting back to the dirigibles.
Jimmy Cagney was in movie with some great sequences on the west coast.
Here Comes the Navy.
Can't copy the address, but YouTube has the goodbits.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on February 14, 2020, 09:02:26 AM
If that was supposed to be a Haiku, you failed miserably  ;D
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on February 15, 2020, 11:50:52 AM
44 BC.  Marc Antony offers Julius Ceasar a crown three times.

Bawb, my best effort at haiku:

An army on the move,
A sniper in the grass,
Unfortunately.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on February 15, 2020, 12:13:47 PM
 :bigthumb:

You may get extra kudos for cramming 5 syllables into one word  ;)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on February 17, 2020, 09:20:43 AM
1944.  The invasion of Eniwetok island, covered by the air attack on Truk, Operation Hailstone.
Although major units of The Combined Fleet had been withdrawn, up to forty cruisers, fesyroers, auxiliaries, and merchants are destroyed.
At one point, the light cruiser Katori and destroyer Maizake, escaped through the northern channel.
The old cruiser commander, Raymond Spruance, decided to take them out with a surface action group that included the battleships Iowa and New Jersey.
The Japanese ships were smothered by overwhelming firepower.  However, the sinking Maizake launched a spread of Long Lance torpedoes.
By deft maneuvering, they passed close between the battleships.
Spruance turn Ed to his Communication officer,. "Well, we won't try that again ."
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on February 17, 2020, 11:36:44 AM
https://twitter.com/WWIIpix/status/1229412171441942529
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on February 17, 2020, 03:36:48 PM
I've always wondered what would've happened if they had dropped one of those Brit Earthquake bombs on Mt. Surabachi? Would've made any difference?
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on February 17, 2020, 03:44:01 PM
Pretty sure it would have knocked the hell out of at least the upper levels of Suribachi.

It's eerie now, if you go look at it on Google Maps. It's half collapsed.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on February 17, 2020, 03:47:46 PM
I've always wondered what would've happened if they had dropped one of those Brit Earthquake bombs on Mt. Surabachi? Would've made any difference?


Or if they had set off one under the island and untethered it from the seabed and all added to capsize :whistle:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on February 17, 2020, 03:50:00 PM
(https://sparrowmissions.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/The-A-Team.jpg)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on February 17, 2020, 03:50:31 PM
Or if they had set off one under the island and untethered it from the seabed and all added to capsize :whistle:

OK, gameleaper
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on February 17, 2020, 03:54:00 PM
Gameleaper would make a helluva Congressman



Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on February 17, 2020, 04:09:39 PM
Oh Jesus  :ROFL: :2funny: :ROFL: :2funny: :ROFL: :2funny:

I had no idea that was a thing.

He sounds like Sheila Jackson Lee. She's an idiot of the Nth degree too. One of her gems is thinking the Constitution is 400 years old, thinking Neil Armstrong visited Mars in 1969, and many, many others. :( And she's been a Congresswoman since 1995.

But we're getting political. Back on topic, today in history, in 1864, the Confederate submarine Hunley sank the USS Housatonic in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on February 17, 2020, 11:12:24 PM
Which Sheila Jackson Lee thinks actually happened in 1684 and was caused by Global Warming. From Mars. No politics, just mild humor intended here.  :peace:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on February 18, 2020, 07:23:04 AM
Which Sheila Jackson Lee thinks actually happened in 1684 and was caused by Global Warming. From Mars. No politics, just mild humor intended here.  :peace:

Humor or no, you're not far off the mark. She's certifiably looney tunes.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on February 23, 2020, 05:58:56 PM
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on February 23, 2020, 08:36:50 PM
Crockett should  have his own damn counter.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on February 23, 2020, 10:50:25 PM
And it ought to look like John Friggin' Wayne. With a dead raccoon on his head.  >:(
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on February 24, 2020, 05:55:20 AM
..this raccoon is not dead...its merely sleeping.  Pining for the forests.................
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on February 24, 2020, 06:28:51 AM
 ;D
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on February 24, 2020, 09:19:09 AM
OK, so this was Saturday. Should've posted it then.



Quote
Michaels was part of a recent NBC conference call discussing his Miracle on Ice call, and he answered the question of whether his call was pre-planned.

“Ken Dryden, who’s phenomenal, he had retired, had never done any broadcasting, was a great partner, a great analyst, and he did so many things during the telecasts. He and I were walking over to the arena. The hotel was four blocks away, and I remember the bottom line of the conversation was if it’s only like 3-1 Soviets midway through the second period, maybe we can keep the audience. Remember the U.S. is trailing three separate times, 1-0, 2-1, 3-2. As it turns out, the U.S. had been out-shot 39-16, so the Soviets really dominated so much of the game, and there was never a moment where I really felt, hey, the U.S. could win this game. Second period was dominated by the Soviets, they lead 3-2, then all of a sudden now you’ve got Mark Johnson scoring again and then Mike’s goal. Now with exactly 10 minutes to go, whoa, holy mackerel, is this possible? And then at that point the crowd is just going out of its mind.

The guys in the production truck forgot to let the key get undepressed or however that works downstairs. They pressed the key down, left it down, and meanwhile now I’ve got a building that’s shaking, a crowd that’s going crazy, and I’ve got to hear all this craziness going on in the truck. So all I did was work in an intense state of concentration. To think about what would be said at the end of the game or how it would be said never could enter my mind. I’ve got to call it pass by pass, shot by shot.

And then just serendipitous that with six or seven seconds to go, the puck comes out to center ice, and now the game is going to be over. The Soviets have no time to mount a last rush. The puck is in the neutral zone. And the word that popped into my head was miraculous. That’s just the word that popped in, and it got morphed into a question and quick answer, and away we went.

But all I’m trying to do at that point is call the game and don’t blow a call. The Soviets could have tied the game. How insane would that have sounded if I would have said that as the Soviets tie the game with one second to go? It was from my heart. It had nothing to do with what it meant to the country or anything beyond sports, but as somebody who’s loved sports since I was five years old, this was an upset. This was a gigantic upset, and so that’s why the word miraculous came into my brain, and I said what I said. But that had everything to do with what an upset, what an incredible moment this is, and not something that I ever thought would live in posterity, because remember in those years, too, nobody had a home video machine, videotape machine, so this is not something you think lives forever. Now of course anything anybody says gets played 18 gazillion times, but that was never a thought back in 1980.”
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on February 24, 2020, 01:44:36 PM
I remember watching that on TV as it happened. No one anywhere thought the Russians would EVER lose a hockey game much less to a bunch of amateur Yanks.  :applause:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on February 24, 2020, 02:07:23 PM
it was broadcast on tape delay, so no one really watched it "as it happened"  8)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on February 24, 2020, 02:12:12 PM
it was broadcast on tape delay, so no one really watched it "as it happened"  8)

The people who were there did  8)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on February 24, 2020, 02:15:47 PM
The link for me says the video is unavailable :-(
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on February 24, 2020, 02:55:20 PM
The link for me says the video is unavailable :-(


f'n' IOC is making copyright claims on videos that have been up for a decade, just b/c everyone is watching them w/ the anniversary of the miracle on ice
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Barthheart on February 24, 2020, 02:59:13 PM
I can se it.... maybe just banned in countries that don't understand hockey.  ;)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on February 24, 2020, 03:09:06 PM
You could well be right, Vance.

Actually, Newcastle does have an ice hockey team.


Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Barthheart on February 24, 2020, 03:17:05 PM
It's HOCKEY, not Ice Hockey.  :nerd:

Only countries that don't understand hockey call it ice hockey.  ;)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on February 24, 2020, 03:21:05 PM
Iced Hockey mocha frappachino with two pumps of soy and one pump of like, totally ugg boot vanilla

it's for Mackchenziegh

Good luck spelling that one right
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on February 24, 2020, 03:47:38 PM
It's HOCKEY, not Ice Hockey.  :nerd:

Only countries that don't understand hockey call it ice hockey.  ;)

Is that the same as people who don't understand water heaters calling them hot water heaters?  :whistle:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on February 24, 2020, 03:56:47 PM
Oh!

So its not hockey played on ice then?

You mean this?

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on February 24, 2020, 03:58:25 PM
It's HOCKEY, not Ice Hockey.  :nerd:

Only countries that don't understand hockey call it ice hockey.  ;)

ahem (http://www.fieldhockey.ca/program/womens-national-team/)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: trailrunner on February 24, 2020, 04:33:38 PM
My daughter played field hockey in HS.  That sure was boring.  I don't think any of the girls had played much before HS, so at their level they couldn't string three passes together.  The ball moved by Brownian motion more than anything else, and every now and then it would drift into a goal.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on February 24, 2020, 04:35:07 PM
1525 Battle of Pavia
Climactic fight of the Bourbon-Habsburg Italian Wars.
An Imperial army enters the walled camp of the French in a night March.  The surprised French fight a unplanned Battle.  German landsknechts best Swiss Pike, and the Imperial arquebusiers, covered in the trees, massacre the nobility of France.
Next day the Habsburg commander, Marquis de Pescara, is astonished at the slaughter of armored knights.
"Oh God, one-thousand years of wazr, but not one day of Battle."
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Barthheart on February 24, 2020, 05:12:45 PM
Oh!

So its not hockey played on ice then?

You mean this?



No, that’s field hockey. It gets a descriptor because it’s not real hockey, which is played on ice.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Barthheart on February 24, 2020, 05:13:51 PM
It's HOCKEY, not Ice Hockey.  :nerd:

Only countries that don't understand hockey call it ice hockey.  ;)

ahem (http://www.fieldhockey.ca/program/womens-national-team/)

What? That link leads to a field hockey team... see above...
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on February 24, 2020, 06:23:30 PM
Oh! So you're just trying to confuse me - it IS ice hockey after all  ;)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on February 24, 2020, 07:17:54 PM
OK, so this was Saturday. Should've posted it then.



Quote
Michaels was part of a recent NBC conference call discussing his Miracle on Ice call, and he answered the question of whether his call was pre-planned.

“Ken Dryden, who’s phenomenal, he had retired, had never done any broadcasting, was a great partner, a great analyst, and he did so many things during the telecasts. He and I were walking over to the arena. The hotel was four blocks away, and I remember the bottom line of the conversation was if it’s only like 3-1 Soviets midway through the second period, maybe we can keep the audience. Remember the U.S. is trailing three separate times, 1-0, 2-1, 3-2. As it turns out, the U.S. had been out-shot 39-16, so the Soviets really dominated so much of the game, and there was never a moment where I really felt, hey, the U.S. could win this game. Second period was dominated by the Soviets, they lead 3-2, then all of a sudden now you’ve got Mark Johnson scoring again and then Mike’s goal. Now with exactly 10 minutes to go, whoa, holy mackerel, is this possible? And then at that point the crowd is just going out of its mind.

The guys in the production truck forgot to let the key get undepressed or however that works downstairs. They pressed the key down, left it down, and meanwhile now I’ve got a building that’s shaking, a crowd that’s going crazy, and I’ve got to hear all this craziness going on in the truck. So all I did was work in an intense state of concentration. To think about what would be said at the end of the game or how it would be said never could enter my mind. I’ve got to call it pass by pass, shot by shot.

And then just serendipitous that with six or seven seconds to go, the puck comes out to center ice, and now the game is going to be over. The Soviets have no time to mount a last rush. The puck is in the neutral zone. And the word that popped into my head was miraculous. That’s just the word that popped in, and it got morphed into a question and quick answer, and away we went.

But all I’m trying to do at that point is call the game and don’t blow a call. The Soviets could have tied the game. How insane would that have sounded if I would have said that as the Soviets tie the game with one second to go? It was from my heart. It had nothing to do with what it meant to the country or anything beyond sports, but as somebody who’s loved sports since I was five years old, this was an upset. This was a gigantic upset, and so that’s why the word miraculous came into my brain, and I said what I said. But that had everything to do with what an upset, what an incredible moment this is, and not something that I ever thought would live in posterity, because remember in those years, too, nobody had a home video machine, videotape machine, so this is not something you think lives forever. Now of course anything anybody says gets played 18 gazillion times, but that was never a thought back in 1980.”

Most everyone thinks that the US team won the gold medal that day. Even back in the nineties it seemed the collective memory.

Not true. They won it when they beat the Finns a couple of days later.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on February 24, 2020, 07:33:58 PM
Correct. Both wins were historic in nature because both the Russkies and the Finns were excellent teams. Nobody ever beat the Russian team, they were all in the Russian Army were essentially  professionals paid to do nothing else but play hockey--- excuse me-- ICE Hockey. So when the U.S. beat them, it was like winning the Gold Medal then. The win over the Finns was also a huge upset.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on February 25, 2020, 07:55:24 AM
And the Soviets were so pissed they went on to beat the snot out of Sweden, 9-2. They then refused to turn in their silver medals to get their names inscribed on them.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on February 25, 2020, 08:27:04 AM
And the Soviets were so pissed they went on to beat the snot out of Sweden, 9-2. They then refused to turn in their silver medals to get their names inscribed on them.


Not quite as bad as the US basketball team in 1972. They have still never even picked up their silver medals after the refs gave away the game at the last second to the Russians
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on February 25, 2020, 11:23:39 AM
You gotta feel for the losing Russians, their next appearance was probably Afghanistan.  :notme:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on February 26, 2020, 03:23:18 PM
https://twitter.com/MAGTravF/status/1232762549755617280
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on February 26, 2020, 03:41:25 PM
Happy Birthday Winnie!  :biggrin:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on February 26, 2020, 03:45:05 PM
He was a bit of an odd duck.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on February 26, 2020, 04:13:28 PM
Yes he was, but he was just the man for that theatre, so it would seem.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on February 26, 2020, 04:23:49 PM
True. You had to be a bit of an odd duck to fight in those conditions.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on February 26, 2020, 04:26:02 PM
Oh aye - pretty awful by any stretch of the imagination.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on February 26, 2020, 07:33:11 PM
He is revered in Israel. Seems he was responsible for training and organizing the first Israeli settlers to defend themselves against Arab attacks in Palestine back in the '20's. Some there consider him the Father of the IDF.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on February 26, 2020, 08:39:32 PM
He is revered in Israel. Seems he was responsible for training and organizing the first Israeli settlers to defend themselves against Arab attacks in Palestine back in the '20's. Some there consider him the Father of the IDF.

Actually, he was active in promoting a British- sanctioned Zionist defense force in the later 30's.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on February 26, 2020, 11:08:55 PM
Yeah, that was it, the '30's. Don't know why I put '20's.  :idiot2:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on February 27, 2020, 08:14:42 AM
https://twitter.com/WWIIpix/status/1232675786664140800
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on February 27, 2020, 10:16:42 AM
https://twitter.com/Battlefields/status/1233047940253523978
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on February 27, 2020, 12:06:15 PM
https://twitter.com/airandspace/status/1233074419683254273
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on February 27, 2020, 12:32:38 PM
^  :'(
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on February 27, 2020, 01:28:19 PM
I always though it was a really impressive aircraft.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on February 28, 2020, 06:53:15 AM
https://twitter.com/LucasfilmGames/status/1233351161043963904
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on February 28, 2020, 07:05:04 AM
https://twitter.com/URDailyHistory/status/1233361706694242304
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on February 28, 2020, 09:09:46 AM
https://twitter.com/LucasfilmGames/status/1233351161043963904

Of all the Star Wars games, this was my favorite back in the day.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on March 04, 2020, 11:46:18 AM
https://twitter.com/airandspace/status/1235244927191265282
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on March 04, 2020, 03:09:33 PM
I hear the airship was only slightly smaller in size than the man. And considerably less gassie.  :P
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on March 04, 2020, 07:11:02 PM
Hugo Eckner, Graff Ferdinand von Zeppelin's successor at the Zeppelin Works, was absolutely horrified at having to sport swastikas on the tail planes for the Hindenburg. He was a strong anti-nazi who tried to run against Hitler in the 1932 elections, putting him near the top of the new regime's naughty list. Afterwards, he still wouldn't top vilifying the Nazis , and it's likely that only his friendship with P. von Hindenberg himself and Eckner's own fame for his airship exploits kept him from a firing squad.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on April 02, 2020, 10:03:33 PM
https://twitter.com/OnDisasters/status/1245121760938405894

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Barthheart on April 02, 2020, 10:23:17 PM
 :ROFL:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: doctorquest on April 02, 2020, 10:31:37 PM
I understand the fighter pilot had a drinking problem.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on April 02, 2020, 10:41:49 PM
It was the salmon mousse.


Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on April 02, 2020, 10:57:18 PM
Shirley you can't be serious!  :idiot2:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on April 03, 2020, 04:32:22 AM
I am.  And don't call me Shirley. 
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on April 03, 2020, 09:55:04 AM
What a pisser.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on April 03, 2020, 01:55:34 PM
Roger, Roger. What's your vector, Victor.

They should make a movie............
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on April 03, 2020, 03:12:25 PM
That post would have also worked in the 'getting old' thread.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on May 31, 2020, 08:34:39 AM
https://twitter.com/USNHistory/status/1267070834742636545
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on June 01, 2020, 03:15:00 PM
https://twitter.com/URDailyHistory/status/1267533623852326912
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on June 01, 2020, 03:16:30 PM
(http://www.aarcentral.com/emoti/worship.gif)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on June 01, 2020, 03:18:06 PM
He deserves Sainthood
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on June 01, 2020, 04:16:10 PM
He deserves Sainthood

Heartily agreed.  'Twas a great day! 

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on June 01, 2020, 04:52:44 PM
Patron saint of Armchair Dragoons.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on June 01, 2020, 05:56:33 PM
Funny how monks sometimes are utterly in advance of humanity.
This gent with Scotch.
Gregor Mendel with genetics.
Blaise Pascal and wagers.
George's Lemaitre and his theory of the Expanding Universe.

And a Dragoon patron saint of thread derailment, Savanarola, and the bonfire of the vanities.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on June 03, 2020, 10:39:53 AM
https://www.history.navy.mil/browse-by-topic/wars-conflicts-and-operations/world-war-ii/1942/midway.html
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on June 03, 2020, 06:45:17 PM
That had to be a nerve-wracking four days for the people on both sides. 
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on June 04, 2020, 09:01:52 AM
"Don't give up the ship!"
The USS Chesapeake attacks HMS Shannon outside of Boston harbor.
One of the most useless and worst fought actions of the War of 1812.
Chesapeake had a poorly trained crew, and  her tactics was straight out of Hollywood, a direct attempt to board Shannon.
Lawrence was a very frustrated officer.  He wanted the command of the famous, and larger, Constitution.  Getting the smaller ship was taken as an insult.
This attack was unnecessary, Shannon was low on provisions and would leave for her base in Newfoundland soon, and ignored Lawrence s orders to take British transports and merchants.  Another frigate wouldn't help the War effort.
Lawrence was a hard luck officer, often missing opportunities.  His judgement may have been effected by Nelson's great friend Cuthbert Collingwood.  During the Barbary War, Lawrence commanded a small 12 gun brig.  Collingwood in Dreadnought a 98gun ship of the line took sailors who didn't have papers.
This seems to have deeply effected Lawrence.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on June 05, 2020, 08:14:58 AM
https://twitter.com/Mighty8thMuseum/status/1268875517832429569
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on June 05, 2020, 09:44:13 AM
https://twitter.com/kershaw_alex/status/1268900961252237315
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on June 05, 2020, 10:24:04 AM
This day in history - 5th June 1944.

My dads unit, as part of 5th Army, had broken out of the Anzio beach head and entered Rome.

It was my dads 24th Birthday.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on June 05, 2020, 10:35:46 AM
that's awesome
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on June 05, 2020, 01:26:54 PM
Jolly Good Show Bob's Dad! I bet that was one BIG Birthday party.  :party:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Barthheart on June 05, 2020, 02:00:08 PM
This day in history - 5th June 1944.

My dads unit, as part of 5th Army, had broken out of the Anzio beach head and entered Rome.

It was my dads 24th Birthday.

Very cool Bob!  :applause:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on June 05, 2020, 02:05:10 PM
^+100!  :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on June 05, 2020, 06:28:32 PM
Great anecdote Bob. Hopefully none of the 'celebratory fireworks' go too close to him and his buddies.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on June 05, 2020, 09:00:31 PM
This day in history - 5th June 1944.

My dads unit, as part of 5th Army, had broken out of the Anzio beach head and entered Rome.

It was my dads 24th Birthday.
 
That's awesome.  :bigthumb: 

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on June 06, 2020, 06:10:17 AM
Great anecdote Bob. Hopefully none of the 'celebratory fireworks' go too close to him and his buddies.

He was badly wounded not too long afterwards and spent several months in hospital - hit by arty if I remember. One day, I'm going to pay to get all his army records since he was in the Territorial Army before the war so saw 6 years of service - most of it overseas. He was in the 5th Infantry (Yorkshire) Division, who's nickname was 'The Globetrotters' since they served in so many different places There is a memorial plaque to the Division in York Minster which we have seen. Very emotive.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on June 06, 2020, 11:15:50 AM
Refraining from making any Basketball jokes in honor of your Father's service.  ::)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on June 06, 2020, 11:19:34 AM
Thank you.

Your restraint is only exceed by your sense of humour, which is noticeable by its absence.  :whistle:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on June 06, 2020, 01:14:10 PM
I am always good on the anniversary of D-Day. But... tomorrow's a new day.  :waiting:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on June 06, 2020, 08:15:38 PM
https://twitter.com/tomhawthorn/status/1269335749649825792
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on June 06, 2020, 08:30:12 PM
The only red shirt who survived!
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on June 06, 2020, 11:04:20 PM
Good Show Mr. Scott!  :applause:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on June 07, 2020, 05:50:20 AM
Awesome!
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on June 07, 2020, 08:46:39 AM
Yep, there's even an episode where you can spot the missing finger.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on June 07, 2020, 09:18:17 AM
How can you spot it if its missing?  :whistle:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on June 07, 2020, 11:10:42 AM
Maybe it's in the box with Schrodinger's cat?
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on June 07, 2020, 12:12:49 PM
https://twitter.com/CAFinUS/status/1269305520411811841
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on June 07, 2020, 02:01:51 PM
That is incredible.

I wonder why we've never heard of it before?
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on June 07, 2020, 02:31:31 PM
I wonder why we've never heard of it before?


claims of their effectiveness were highly inflated
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on June 07, 2020, 03:39:01 PM
...you've just dirigibled down your chin..............
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on June 07, 2020, 03:41:50 PM
he usually passes gas
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on June 07, 2020, 04:45:57 PM
Blew-up this thread didn't he?  :applause:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on June 11, 2020, 03:02:11 PM
https://twitter.com/Battlefields/status/1271155514223845376
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on June 11, 2020, 10:09:11 PM
https://twitter.com/URDailyHistory/status/1271262947260719104
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on June 11, 2020, 11:11:57 PM
There was a great piece on NatGeo's Drain The Ocean show Tuesday I believe about the Alabama. How she was designed to be able to disguise herself as a sailing merchant to get close enough to surprise her targets.  :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on June 12, 2020, 06:40:47 AM
It met its fate in the English Channel as I recall - and no, before you ask, I didn't see it myself.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on June 12, 2020, 09:42:18 AM
On June 12th at 1000 the 51st Highland Division, under the command of Major General Victor Fortune, surrendered to the Germans at Saint-Valery-en-Caux. Surrounded, General Fortune had considered other options, such as counter attacking, but with little ammunition and the nearby French 9th Corps, (I think?) surrendering just a couple of hours earlier, General Fortune decided to surrender to General Rommel, commanding the German 7th Panzer division.

You can learn the full history from the official 51st Highland Division website: https://51hd.co.uk/history/valery_1940

Two interesting items for your consideration related to this event in history.

The first item: Davy Steele, of Battlefield band, wrote a song about this event in 1998. His father and uncle where in the Seaforth Highlanders and both were present during the Battle of St. Valery. Davy's father escaped, but his uncle did not, which Davy includes in his song. Here is Mr. Steele's song:


The second item: During the latest episode of Pipeline (June 6th, 2020), at BBC Radio Scotland, there is a segment about the Battle of St. Valery. You can find it here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m000jtbg - Please note: it is only available for about three more weeks.

There were many famous pipers in the 51st Highland Division and Pipeline host Gary West starts a story about how "Wee" Donald Macleod escaped from the Germans on the long march through France at the 22:45 mark. Mr. Macleod's daughter Susan picks up the story starting at the 23:00 mark of how her father managed the escape and finishes at 24:35.

The recording won't be available after three more weeks, so here's rough transcript of the story.

Susan: They were on a forced march, now uncle ? and uncle Angus was on that forced march, so was Pipe Major Donald MacLean of Lewis, not that they were together, but on one of the rests on this march, Dad, being so small rolled into a ditch and wasn't missed. He wandered around France for quite a while, just eating raw turnips from the fields and eventually the resistance picked him up. They grouped him with some other chaps and they were trying, I think he got out at St. Valery eventually, but they were trying to get there without the Germans knowing what their purpose was. They were accosted once or twice by Germans and Dad just spoke Gaelic to them. I hate to think what he was saying...

Unknown male voice humorously says: And the Germans said, "Are you from Stornoway?"

Susan: … and they just thought they were eastern Europeans and they let them go.

Gary West: I've heard a lot of stories about how useful Gaelic can be at times when there's non-speakers around too, so that was clearly a key, a crucial one.

Susan: Yes, indeed.

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on June 12, 2020, 11:13:30 AM
 George McDonald Fraser in one of the Private McAuslan (the durtiest sojer in da wur-rld) stories, noted that the jocks at St Valery sang naughty Glaswegian songs at the Germans before the tanks rolled in.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on June 12, 2020, 11:24:46 AM
That would have probably been enough to blister the paint off 'em.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on June 12, 2020, 08:29:12 PM
www.combinedfleet.com/shoksink.htm

This is a few days early, but with my memory...
Here is a study of the torpedoing of the Japanese carrier Shokaku.
Very interesting recreation.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on June 14, 2020, 02:57:35 PM
www.combinedfleet.com/guadoil1.htm

Following the success of the Battle of Midway, Admiral King starts working on the problem of stopping the Japanese in the Solomon's Island chain.
They are beginning to construct an airfield on the Lunga plain of Guadalcanal.
The above article addresses the serious issues facing the Japanese navy.
On the face of it, the Japanese navy should have been able to stop the Americans.
Logistics was one key.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on June 17, 2020, 10:41:07 AM
Today marks the 245th anniversary of the battle of Bunker Hill. Thomas Williams (@twilliams01301 over in Twitter-land) has a nice essay from 2013 about the battle.

You can find it at the Small Wars Journal: https://smallwarsjournal.com/jrnl/art/bunker-hill-a-story-of-prudent-risk-and-reckless-irresponsibility

 In Mr. Williams words:

Quote
In this short “staff ride” we explore the decisions General William Howe and others faced in June 1775 to contemplate the line between what is prudent risk and reckless irresponsibility.  For the sake of space, there are many aspects of the battle not discussed, leaders not talked about (Putnam and Warren to name just two) and events ignored or given short shrift.  It’s a risk taken for the sake of a larger point.

At the bottom of the essay is a link to West Points history department with additional info about the American Revolutionary War. There are four pdf files which have nice maps of the battle.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on June 17, 2020, 10:44:28 AM
very cool!
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on June 21, 2020, 07:32:31 PM
https://twitter.com/airandspace/status/1274847078473179136
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on June 22, 2020, 11:16:22 AM
https://twitter.com/airandspace/status/1275083994951016459
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on June 22, 2020, 12:02:28 PM
https://twitter.com/USNHistory/status/1275096318151667712
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on June 22, 2020, 03:55:04 PM
Wasn't the Daniel Boone the sub that killed a Russian Bear with a Bowie Knife?  :hehe:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on June 23, 2020, 06:53:00 AM
https://twitter.com/bletchleypark/status/1275322866557497344
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on June 25, 2020, 08:36:08 AM
https://twitter.com/landofthe80s/status/1276131790831443969
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on June 25, 2020, 08:43:13 AM
<hides behind sofa>
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on June 25, 2020, 11:28:10 AM
I'm more a fan of the original actually. Scared the crap outta me as a kid. But then, a lot did back then.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on June 25, 2020, 02:02:59 PM
https://twitter.com/Battlefields/status/1276213843811852288
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on June 29, 2020, 11:46:46 PM
Quote
"Meatballs", released on this date in 1979, is noted for Bill Murray's first film appearance in a starring role and for launching the directing career of Ivan Reitman, whose later comedies included "Stripes" (1981) and "Ghostbusters" (1984), both starring Murray. The film was the highest-grossing Canadian film in the United States of all-time and also in Canada, winning the Golden Reel Award, an award presented to the Canadian film with the biggest box office gross of the year.

Reitman and Harold Ramis (one of the film's writers) wanted John Landis to direct this movie, because of his work that he did on "Animal House" (1978). But Landis turned it down because he was too busy working on "The Blues Brothers" (1980). Because of this, Reitman decided to direct it himself. Ramis said that Reitman did not know for certain whether Murray would be in the movie until he showed up for the first day of filming; Murray only signed on to do the film very late because of his contractual obligations to "Saturday Night Live".

The movie was filmed at an actual summer camp, Camp White Pine, in Haliburton, Ontario (a few hours north of Toronto). Many of the extras in the film were actual campers and counselors of the camp; most if not all locations were actual camp facilities (basketball courts, mess hall, swim docks, cabins, etc.). The "Visitors Day" scene/montage was actually filmed during the camp's Visitors Day; White Pine also had a similar yearly event to the "Olympiad" - although rather than being a inter-camp competition, it was an intra-camp relay-type competition that was just part of an overall all-day themed event. These competitions were nicknamed "Mohawk Relays", perhaps serving as inspiration for the name of the rival camp in the movie.

According to one of the featurettes on the DVD, several of the shots in the movie were added after initial filming ended. These included the scenes of Rudy and Tripper at the bus station and of them playing blackjack for peanuts. During the time off, Chris Makepeace had entered puberty and had the beginnings of a mustache. Murray decided that it had to go so he took Makepeace over to a sink, lathered him up with soap and shaved off his mustache. So Makepeace received his first ever shave from Murray.

It's never explained why the movie title is "Meatballs". (There are no meatballs in this movie). Except "Meatball" is a general term for a silly person, and the campers in this movie do act silly. The Stomach calls Spaz a meatball while they're playing tennis. (Wikipedia/IMDb)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Barthheart on June 30, 2020, 05:46:24 AM
 :rockon:
Damn, I’m old....
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on June 30, 2020, 09:59:38 AM
Meatballs was okay. Caddyshack was, to me anyway, Murray's real breakout movie.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on June 30, 2020, 10:08:11 AM
Stripes was his real breakout.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Barthheart on June 30, 2020, 11:00:17 AM
Stripes was his real breakout.

This +100
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on June 30, 2020, 11:41:33 AM
I actually typed Stripes first, but looked it up and saw Caddyshack was before that. But yeah, in Stripes he had a leading role as opposed to just a goofy minor character.

Back when HBO only had one channel in the early 80s, and showed stuff over and over, I probably watched Stripes once a day all summer. What a glorious film.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on July 03, 2020, 12:03:14 PM
https://twitter.com/USNHistory/status/1279082581263372288
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on July 05, 2020, 09:53:31 AM
https://twitter.com/USNAMuseum/status/1279771322248282112
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on July 08, 2020, 02:18:50 PM
https://twitter.com/USNHistory/status/1280841582292471810
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on July 08, 2020, 04:14:54 PM
https://twitter.com/PulpLibrarian/status/1280954163241893889
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on July 08, 2020, 11:46:04 PM
He had an inflated opinion of himself.  ::)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: judgedredd on July 09, 2020, 01:05:30 AM
 :applause:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on July 09, 2020, 06:44:37 AM
I soooo want to see that movie!
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on July 10, 2020, 12:45:56 AM
I soooo want to see that movie!

According to the Internet Archive, the movie poster was made in 1971 by Hammer Films for a movie that was never produced. In 2007 a short video was created mashing up different films to create a faux six and a half minute short, akin to a serial from the 1930s. If you have 6.5 minutes to spare, you can find it here: https://archive.org/details/zeppelin_vs_pterodactyls_1936
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on July 17, 2020, 08:06:22 AM
https://twitter.com/landofthe80s/status/1284096291035910151
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on July 17, 2020, 08:46:52 AM
and only 1 of them was actually any good - the original movie!
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on July 17, 2020, 09:02:15 AM
True, dat.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on July 17, 2020, 04:10:31 PM
I liked the first 2. After that they should've been recalled. I was at the theater the night it premiered locally. There were cops everywhere when I pulled into the parking lot. I thought there must've been a riot in progress, so naturally I got out to get a new TV. Then I found out they were there just for the movie.  :-[
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on July 24, 2020, 09:04:53 AM
https://twitter.com/landofthe80s/status/1286648098970886152
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on July 24, 2020, 09:11:50 AM
I was lucky that my friend's sister worked at the theater where it was showing. She let us in for free. I still feel like I paid too much to see it.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on July 24, 2020, 09:18:28 AM
I never bothered to watch it. Superman III was bad enough.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on July 25, 2020, 07:01:12 PM
https://twitter.com/GolfDigest/status/1287019704972869634
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on July 25, 2020, 07:04:23 PM
Dang, that's about the last time I saw it.  :(
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on July 25, 2020, 07:17:27 PM
AC/DC's Back In Black was 40 years ago today, too
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on July 26, 2020, 06:23:22 AM
Bloody hell! You have to be kidding. Its the only album of theirs that I have.

As a pal of mine once said - you only need one AC/DC album and you have them all.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on July 26, 2020, 07:21:44 AM
He's not wrong
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on July 26, 2020, 07:53:06 AM
Oh, and HAPPY BIRTHDAY, Brant  :party:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on July 26, 2020, 09:02:18 AM
 Happy B-Day Brant!
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on July 26, 2020, 09:10:03 AM
Happy Birthday! (http://www.aarcentral.com/emoti/new/smilie_happy_011.gif)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on July 26, 2020, 09:35:50 AM
Have a great day!
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on July 26, 2020, 09:56:19 AM
Thanks y'all 😀
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: doctorquest on July 26, 2020, 11:17:35 AM
Oh, and HAPPY BIRTHDAY, Brant  :party:

+100000000000000000000000000000000000000!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  :rockon:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on July 26, 2020, 12:10:52 PM
https://twitter.com/OnthisdayRN/status/1287219841213104129
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on July 26, 2020, 05:44:14 PM
Happy Birthday, Brant!  Whoot! 
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on July 26, 2020, 11:13:11 PM
Happy Birthday Brant! If you're reading this.... you're not celebrating it correctly.  :rockon:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Davout on July 27, 2020, 04:20:07 AM
- Happy Birthday Brant !
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on July 27, 2020, 07:12:01 AM
Happy Birthday Brant! If you're reading this.... you're not celebrating it correctly.  :rockon:

Well, I'm reading it the next day  :biggrin:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on July 27, 2020, 07:03:58 PM
https://twitter.com/USNHistory/status/1287885507574325248
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on July 28, 2020, 07:00:47 AM
Must have been the longest lasting cease-fire in history.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on July 30, 2020, 08:33:01 AM
https://twitter.com/USNHistory/status/1288814121002164225
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on July 30, 2020, 06:57:45 PM
Alt history fans probably wonder what would have happened had she been sunk while still on her secret mission.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on July 30, 2020, 07:06:15 PM
We still would have nuked Japan.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on July 30, 2020, 07:20:35 PM
There was only one other bomb so perhaps events could have been altered slightly after the first attack with no immediate second and a long pause while other devices were being painstakingly built. Remember, the Japanese had no way of knowing there were only two, hence the gambled use of both of them, bluffing there was a bigger supply. Russia's actions in Europe could also have become bolder.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: mirth on July 30, 2020, 07:32:54 PM
The Japanese government was still looking for terms after the Hiroshima bombing. With no prompt follow-up attack, they might have held on for a bit longer.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: trailrunner on August 03, 2020, 07:11:31 AM
33 years ago today I started my first post-collegiate job.  Reagan was president, and the first project I worked on was funded by SDI.  As the new guy, I got a the latest and greatest computer: an IBM AT with 40 Mb of storage and DOS 3.3 (I think).  And a box of 5-1/4 inch floppies.

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on August 03, 2020, 12:46:03 PM
Wow. That was a real beast for the day. Bet you fell in love didn't you? And when the boss wasn't looking.... what'd you play on it?
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on August 13, 2020, 11:02:08 AM
A personal date in History. My Wife just reminded me 16 years ago today a guy named Charlie showed-up on our doorstep... Hurricane Charlie that is, on Friday the 13th. And he was a real scary Mo Fo. We were fortunate and suffered no major damage or injuries but many others were not so lucky. A VERY bad storm. Charlie, if you're listening, there's NO reunion party so you don't EVER need to came back this way again.  :angrytongue:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on August 13, 2020, 11:43:07 AM
yikes!
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on August 20, 2020, 12:22:02 PM
August 20th, 1968: Czechoslovakia was invaded by Russian and 4 Warsaw pact forces. This was operation Danube in direct response to Prague Spring. Here's what the NYT looked like on August 21st

(https://i.postimg.cc/PxCKBDy0/Aug20-68-Czech-invaded.png)
Source: New York Times, 21 Aug. 1968 - ProQuest

I did a very quick check to see if there were any wargames about this topic. I did not find any. I'm sure there are wargames about the cold war going hot in the late sixties with this as a catalyst for the fighting; however, I did not anything specific to this event. Does one exist?

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on August 20, 2020, 06:14:52 PM
Offhand nothing comes to mind.
Maybe an issue game in S&T?
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on August 20, 2020, 06:30:47 PM
I know of at least 2 about Budapest in '56, but not sure about this one.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on August 20, 2020, 11:02:18 PM
If there are any, I would not want to play as the Czechs.  :notme:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on August 21, 2020, 08:18:47 AM
^And that's why there's not any.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on August 21, 2020, 11:39:38 AM
On August 21st, 1942 the Battle of Tenaru, aka the battle of Alligator Creek took place. The US Marines stopped and then counter attacked an assault by Japanese forces to take Henderson Air Field on Guadalcanal.

Here's 15 minute YouTube video from a Marine vet who walked the battlefield last year and provided a good explanation of what happened. He splices together a few old photos next to his current footage to show the "then and now" aspect of the area to excellent effect. It is well worth the 15 mins to watch.


I looked for a wargame that deals with this battle and discovered Guadalcanal: Semper Fi Series published by Avalanche Press in 2003.

Here's a link to the BBG page about Guadalcanal: Semper Fi Series (https://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/7177/guadalcanal-semper-fi-series/)

Here's a link to a replay of scenario about the Battle of the Tenaru (https://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/520523/scenario-824-battle-tenaru-banzai-japanese-you-wan)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on August 21, 2020, 11:42:09 AM
nice!  thanks for sharing :)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on August 21, 2020, 06:26:17 PM
That is indeed cool.

There was a paid third party addon for Steel Panthers, 'Watchtower', that was basically a long campaign game covering Guadalcanal, with a media-sweetened interface. It was one of four, with the others covering the DAK in North Africa and also one for Barbarossa. IIRC, you can now get them from Matrix Games now as 'Steel Panthers: Generals', a single install with all four using the SPWAW engine.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on September 01, 2020, 12:23:41 PM
That is indeed cool.

There was a paid third party addon for Steel Panthers, 'Watchtower', that was basically a long campaign game covering Guadalcanal, with a media-sweetened interface. It was one of four, with the others covering the DAK in North Africa and also one for Barbarossa. IIRC, you can now get them from Matrix Games now as 'Steel Panthers: Generals', a single install with all four using the SPWAW engine.

I didn't know this. Thank you for the heads up. I've added it to my ever growing list of games to play.  :)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on September 01, 2020, 12:33:41 PM
I hope this doesn't seem trite and yet I will include this in the thread. 81 years ago today, Germany invaded Poland, starting the path toward World War Two.

Here's what the New York Times front page looked like:

(https://i.postimg.cc/9009n3mr/nyt-01-sept-39.png)
Source: New York Times, 1 Sept. 1939 - ProQuest

Instead of linking to a wargame about this event, I'll link to a book. There are so many to choose from I wasn't sure which to pick. I decided upon Reporting World War II (http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/505083347) published by the Library of America. Therein you will find a Sigred Schultz's "At dawn this morning Hitler moved against Poland: War begins: September 1-3, 1939".

I know getting books from libraries are difficult right now due to the pandemic. Hopefully if your local library has this book, they also provide a curb side pick-up.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on September 01, 2020, 12:41:52 PM
David Thompson is working on a new game, Soldiers in Postmen's Uniforms, detailing the defense of a Polish post office in Danzig during that first day of the German invasion of Poland. The game utilizes his excellent system from both Pavlov's House and Castle Itter, so it is a solitaire game where you control the Polish defenders versus the German AI.

https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/1839997/soldiers-postmens-uniforms-defense-polish-post-off/page/1
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on September 01, 2020, 01:13:37 PM
David Thompson is working on a new game, Soldiers in Postmen's Uniforms, detailing the defense of a Polish post office in Danzig during that first day of the German invasion of Poland. The game utilizes his excellent system from both Pavlov's House and Castle Itter, so it is a solitaire game where you control the Polish defenders versus the German AI.

https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/1839997/soldiers-postmens-uniforms-defense-polish-post-off/page/1

Nice! Thank you for this information, I wasn't aware of it. A quick search shows me it will go the Kickstarter route. I'll keep my eye on it.

While searching BBG I found another game about the defense of the Polish Post Office: Not Yet Lost: The Defense of the Polish Post Office in Danzig (https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/260157/not-yet-lost-defense-polish-post-office-danzig) It looks like it is a free print and play game by Chris Davis. I am not familiar with his work. You can find the game here: Not Yet Lost (https://americanprideweb.wordpress.com/simulations/)

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on September 01, 2020, 01:40:29 PM
Cool, thanks. I didn't know about that one.

I highly suggest the Solitaire Wargames group on Facebook; David (and many other devs) post there often about upcoming projects.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on September 02, 2020, 12:36:28 PM
I highly suggest the Solitaire Wargames group on Facebook; David (and many other devs) post there often about upcoming projects.

Thank you for the recommendation. I don't use Fb, so all I can do is browse the group a wee bit and that's fine. I'll check in with the public facing side of that Fb group from time to time to see if I can keep up on their news.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on September 02, 2020, 12:52:48 PM
On this day in 1945 Japan formally surrendered in Tokyo Bay aboard the USS Missouri (BB-63), bring an end to World War II. The photo depicts the Japanese delegation sent to participate in the surrender ceremony. The two people in the front are: Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu, who is holding a walking cane, and General Yoshijiro Umezu, Chief of the Army General Staff. You can find the names of most of the delegation by clicking on the link to the Naval History and Heritage Command.

(https://i.postimg.cc/1z6RBMwD/japan-surrender-45.jpg)

Source: Naval History and Heritage Command USA-C-2719 (https://www.history.navy.mil/our-collections/photography/us-navy-ships/battleships/missouri-bb-63/USA-C-2719.html)

There are many games that deal with the Pacific Theater of Operations. I'm will not try to list them all. I discovered while looking for potential games to link to for this post that Mark Herman has designer credits for three Pacific War games, albeit one is a second edition of a game her designed in 1985 with Victory Games. They are:

Pacific War: The Struggle Against Japan 1941-1945 (1985) (https://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/5622/pacific-war-struggle-against-japan-1941-1945)

Pacific War: The Struggle Against Japan, 1941-1945 (Second Edition) (2021) (https://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/314577/pacific-war-struggle-against-japan-1941-1945-secon)

Empire of the Sun (2005) (https://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/11825/empire-sun)

I think the main difference between them is Empire of the Sun is a card driven game whereas Pacific War is not. I haven't played any of them so I am not sure. What are your favorite games depicting the Pacific Theater?

Don't forget the ACD's own bbmike has a great video about Guadalcanal - A Combat Boots Game. If you haven't watched it yet, what are you waiting for?  ;D


Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on September 02, 2020, 01:46:15 PM
 :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on September 03, 2020, 06:07:20 PM
OK, this one is for Panzerde:

On this date in 1651 the battle Worcester took place. This was the last battle of the English Civil war in which Oliver Cromwell, leading his New Model Army, defeats the mainly Scottish forces of the Royalist army.

(https://i.postimg.cc/xTT3C3py/battle-of-worcester.png)
Source: British Library's flickr account (https://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/10998051496)

From what I can tell, Cromwell set a trap for Charles II and Charles obligingly took the bait, hook, line and sinker. The mainly Scottish forces of the Royalist army were out numbered about 2 to 1 by Cromwell's New Model Army. The Scots fought hard and lost. Charles II fled the field and was on the lamb for about six weeks trying to make his way back to France. His escape became known as the Royal Miracle due to the number of times he was almost caught, yet eluded capture. I'm not sure how much of the stories are true and how much are exaggerated into legend. Either way, it makes for an interesting story.

While researching this I found two interesting related pieces of information. They are:

A blog entry by the Worcester Cathedral Library and Archive (https://worcestercathedrallibrary.blogspot.com/2013/11/surgery-and-medical-treatment-by.html) about Royalist surgeon Richard Wiseman and his book Severall Chirurgicall Treatises. It is a quick read and provides interesting examples of what it was like to be a doctor during this time period. Many of the wounds are treated with egg whites and vinegar.  :o

The second interesting piece of info is, this is also the day Oliver Cromwell dies in 1658, seven years after the end of the English Civil war.

Here are the wargames I found associated with this battle:

Ironsides: Preston 1648 Worcester 1651 (https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/192069/ironsides-preston-1648-worcester-1651)
This game has two battles in it, Breston and Worcester. I have never played it, so no idea if it is good or not.

Horse & Matchlock: Prelude to an Era (https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/257087/horse-matchlock-prelude-era)
There are 22 scenarios in this game with the battle of Worcester being one of them. I don't have this game, (yet!), so I can't comment on it. If you listen to the ACD podcast you might have heard Panzerde discuss it. It sounds very good and I'm curious to see how it handles the battle of Worcester.

Does anyone else have recommended games either about this battle or time period?
 
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on September 04, 2020, 07:00:12 PM
On this day in 1260 the battle of Montaperti took place in Tuscany, Italy
(https://i.postimg.cc/qv7K7Vnw/Battle-of-Montaperti.jpg)
Source: Wikimedia Commons (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Battle_of_Montaperti.jpg)

This battle was a bit confusing to me as I read about it. It honestly read like two gangs fighting instead of two armies, only the gangs were really, really big. The folks on the left are the Guelphs and they are on the side of the Pope. The fellows riding their horses with swords raised, ready to smite all those in their path, are the Ghibellines and they are on the side of German kings who wanted to claim parts of northern Italy, so think the Holy Roman Empire. There was a lot of squabbling over this part of Italy for political and economic reasons which culminated in this battle. The Ghibellines crushed the Guelphs, mainly because a group of Guelphs soldiers changed sides during the battle to fight for the Ghibellines. Never a good thing!

I wasn't sure I could find a wargame about this battle, but thanks to BBG, I found one: The Age of Dante: Montaperti and Campaldino (https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/72523/age-dante-montaperti-and-campaldino)



Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on September 05, 2020, 03:58:10 AM
Interesting!  I hadn't even heard of that one before. 
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on September 05, 2020, 08:39:12 AM
Clearly, the folks on the right are coming out of the TARDIS. I suspect the Doctor's involvement in this one. Most likely the First Doctor.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on September 05, 2020, 11:17:44 AM
Clearly, the folks on the right are coming out of the TARDIS. I suspect the Doctor's involvement in this one. Most likely the First Doctor.

I had not noticed that until you pointed it out!  ;D
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on September 05, 2020, 11:25:15 AM
Clearly, the folks on the right are coming out of the TARDIS. I suspect the Doctor's involvement in this one. Most likely the First Doctor.

 :biggrin:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on September 05, 2020, 11:52:16 AM
On Sept 5th we have the Battle of Virginia Capes, also know as the Battle of the Chesapeake.
(https://i.postimg.cc/MKPCsZN1/Virginia-Capes.jpg)
Source: Naval History and Heritage Command: NH 73927-KN Battle of the Virginia Capes (https://www.history.navy.mil/content/history/nhhc/our-collections/photography/numerical-list-of-images/nhhc-series/nh-series/NH-42000/NH-42904.html)

This is the naval battle which helps end the American Revolutionary War, or War of Independence, take your pick. What I didn't realize while reading about this battle was Rear Admiral Graves waited for the French fleet to exit Chesapeake Bay instead of attacking them while they sailed out to sea. It might have been a very different result if Admiral Graves attacked the French ships immediately instead of waiting.

I didn't find a game specifically about this battle; however I did find a scenario for it: Chesapeake 1781 (https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/70297/chesapeake-1781)

This scenario is for the game Master and Commander published by White Dog Games.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on September 05, 2020, 01:24:56 PM
I've always wondered about Graves' choices in that battle.  Small wonder they're still scrutinized today. 
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on September 05, 2020, 02:16:10 PM
Also, Graves' subordinate was Admiral Hood, who had some kind of dispute with him.
One account stated that Graves' put up an order which ensured the rear squadron, under Hood, would not be able to support Graves' ships in the lead.
Instead of piling on sail to engage the enemy, Hood followed his order and left the leading ships to fight alone.

One of the reasons Nelson was lauded and was successful was his willingness to go off script.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on September 06, 2020, 11:22:44 AM
Also, Graves' subordinate was Admiral Hood, who had some kind of dispute with him.
One account stated that Graves' put up an order which ensured the rear squadron, under Hood, would not be able to support Graves' ships in the lead.
Instead of piling on sail to engage the enemy, Hood followed his order and left the leading ships to fight alone.

One of the reasons Nelson was lauded and was successful was his willingness to go off script.

Interesting. That would help explain what happened. After reading about the Battle of Virginia Capes I definitely want to dig into this a bit more to get a better understanding of what transpired.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on September 06, 2020, 11:49:44 AM
On this day in 1914 the 1st Battle of the Marne began. It started on the 6th and end on the 12th of September. Instead of posting an image about it, I decided to link to the BBC's 1964 documentary about WW I called the Great War. The documentary doesn't spend much time on this battle. To get the complete picture, you'll need to watch the last 3 minutes of the 4th episode. I couldn't get the embedded youtube function to started at the right place, but this link will take you to the correct start time. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9CbhyHynbCA&feature=youtu.be&t=2103)

Then watch the first 6 and a half minutes of the 5th episode here:


I like the Great War documentary. The firsthand accounts of the soldiers who were there, from both sides of the war is amazing. If you haven't watched it, I recommend you make the time to view it.

There are a lot of games about this battle. While looking for some for this post, I discovered a game about the taxis which sent French troops to the front during this battle. This is not a war game, but a co-operative game about this event in the battle: Les taxis de la Marne (https://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/181005/les-taxis-de-la-marne) It definitely looks like fun.  :)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on September 07, 2020, 11:35:10 AM
This one is for Cyrano.

On this day in 1812, the Battle of Borodino took place. What can I saw about this battle that you all don't already know? Probably nothing. I'll leave you with an image from the Borodino Panorama in Moscow. If you are not familiar with this panorama, you can learn about it here: Borodino Panorama (https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/borodino-panorama)

(https://i.postimg.cc/d0LWJt6P/Battle-Borodino-panorama.jpg)
Source: Wikimedia Commons (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Battle_of_Borodino_panorama_-_detail_05.jpg)

Cyrano commemorated the battle of the Shevardino Redoubt with his son over the weekend playing Commands and Colors: Napoleonics. You can watch it here:

Cyrano and the ACD crew commemorated the Battle of Borodino here:

There are a lot of games depicting this battle. The one I recommend is Eagles of the Empire: Borodino (https://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/7830/eagles-empire-borodino) published by Games USA. It is an area movement game. I really like this system. It never caught on, which is a real shame.  :(
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on September 07, 2020, 03:39:10 PM
I played the battle way back in the 80's with SSI's Battles of Napoleon on my Amiga. I got my butt handed to me by the Russkies. Tip, charging fortifications with cavalry NEVER works.  :notme:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on September 07, 2020, 05:18:29 PM
When Marshal Enterprises brought out their first game,Battaille de la Moscowa, one guy picked it right up.
There were no limits on using g the Imperial Guard.  We found releasing the Young Guard to support Poniatowski and clear the Utitza woods was a game winner.
Not realistic for Napoleon to use the Guard so early in any battle, but made for a great experience.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on September 07, 2020, 10:51:02 PM
Didn't Marshal Davout favor moving around that flank instead of going up the middle?
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on September 08, 2020, 12:05:16 AM
Didn't Marshal Davout favor moving around that flank instead of going up the middle?

Yes. According to Esposito & Elting, in their A Military History and Atlas of the Napoleonic Wars on page 116, Davout wasn't in favor of Napoleon's plan and wanted to flank the Russian left with his corps. Poniatowski would have supported Davout's right flank in this attack. Esposito & Elting think this would have worked and speculate Napoleon didn't accept this plan because it would have caused Kutusov to rapidly retreat.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on September 08, 2020, 09:08:45 AM
Quote
According to Esposito & Elting, in their A Military History and Atlas of the Napoleonic Wars...

I'm thinking that this is a book I need to own.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on September 08, 2020, 10:47:05 AM
I've been picking events in history that are interesting to me and have a game, or a book, about the battle, or the theater of operations in which the battle took place. Today is going to be a wee bit different...

On this day in 1966, the first episode of Star Trek premiered with the story, "The Man Trap" on NBC. You all know the history behind Star Trek and the abundance of stories, programs, films, books and games that are either about the Star Trek universe, or which were inspired by it. There are many games from the Star Trek universe and I'd like to highlight the one from 1979 which was one of my first forays into this hobby we all love: Star Fleet Battles (https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/1589/star-fleet-battles).

SFB wasn't the first wargame I played. It was one of the first wargames I purchased as as a young lad. Here's a pic of my copy:
(https://i.postimg.cc/B6L6sKk9/sfb-box.jpg)

As you can see, my copy of the game has been on many voyages. I had a lot of fun playing this game. I haven't played it in ages, mainly because I'm interested in other aspects of gaming; however, I am very glad Star Trek came along, not only to give us the television programs, books and films, but because it also provided us with a lot of great games.  :v
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on September 08, 2020, 11:35:26 AM
Mike, if you do find a copy of Esposito and Eating, it is a great read.
There are at least two editions.  The first was oversized and hard covered.  Really let the maps shine.  This one came in the 60s and I think the imprint was B Franklin.
It was reprinted by Prager maybe fifteen years later and is virtually the same.
A later print kept the maps and I think the text was updated.  Not sure of this.
However, the size was reduced so the maps are tinier and names harder to read.
These have soft covers, so you can clearly recognize which version.
Personally, the earlier editions by Franklin. And Prager, with the full size maps, are a lot more satisfying.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on September 08, 2020, 05:29:06 PM
Mike, if you do find a copy of Esposito and Eating, it is a great read.
There are at least two editions.  The first was oversized and hard covered.  Really let the maps shine.  This one came in the 60s and I think the imprint was B Franklin.
It was reprinted by Prager maybe fifteen years later and is virtually the same.
A later print kept the maps and I think the text was updated.  Not sure of this.
However, the size was reduced so the maps are tinier and names harder to read.
These have soft covers, so you can clearly recognize which version.
Personally, the earlier editions by Franklin. And Prager, with the full size maps, are a lot more satisfying.

Well, I found one for about as much as a high dollar wargame would cost but I bought it anyway. It's the first edition so I don't feel too bad. Can't wait to get it!
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on September 08, 2020, 05:33:14 PM
I've been picking events in history that are interesting to me and have a game, or a book, about the battle, or the theater of operations in which the battle took place. Today is going to be a wee bit different...

On this day in 1966, the first episode of Star Trek premiered with the story, "The Man Trap" on NBC. You all know the history behind Star Trek and the abundance of stories, programs, films, books and games that are either about the Star Trek universe, or which were inspired by it. There are many games from the Star Trek universe and I'd like to highlight the one from 1979 which was one of my first forays into this hobby we all love: Star Fleet Battles (https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/1589/star-fleet-battles).

SFB wasn't the first wargame I played. It was one of the first wargames I purchased as as a young lad. Here's a pic of my copy:
(https://i.postimg.cc/B6L6sKk9/sfb-box.jpg)

As you can see, my copy of the game has been on many voyages. I had a lot of fun playing this game. I haven't played it in ages, mainly because I'm interested in other aspects of gaming; however, I am very glad Star Trek came along, not only to give us the television programs, books and films, but because it also provided us with a lot of great games.  :v

Looks like you had the second or third edition. I was lucky enough to be gifted the original edition way back when. I still have it and several expansions that came after. I also have some of the Nexus magazines that went with it.

(https://www.aarcentral.com/pics/sfb79.jpg)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on September 08, 2020, 07:06:59 PM
Mike, if you do find a copy of Esposito and Eating, it is a great read.
There are at least two editions.  The first was oversized and hard covered.  Really let the maps shine.  This one came in the 60s and I think the imprint was B Franklin.
It was reprinted by Prager maybe fifteen years later and is virtually the same.
A later print kept the maps and I think the text was updated.  Not sure of this.
However, the size was reduced so the maps are tinier and names harder to read.
These have soft covers, so you can clearly recognize which version.
Personally, the earlier editions by Franklin. And Prager, with the full size maps, are a lot more satisfying.

I didn't know there was a second printing of this book. I have the hardcover edition and I agree, the larger size is wonderful for the maps. I have a hard time imagining this book with smaller maps. If I come across the newer edition I might be tempted to purchase it just to see if the information is updated.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on September 08, 2020, 07:11:55 PM
Mike, if you do find a copy of Esposito and Eating, it is a great read...

Personally, the earlier editions by Franklin. And Prager, with the full size maps, are a lot more satisfying.

Well, I found one for about as much as a high dollar wargame would cost but I bought it anyway. It's the first edition so I don't feel too bad. Can't wait to get it!

Wow, Mike, you don't mess around! I purchased my copy 20+ years ago. It took some time to track down a copy that was in decent shape and one that didn't have pencil or pen markings in it. I think you will be very satisfied with your purchase. I turn to it frequently for the maps alone, even though the information contained in it is very useful too.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on September 08, 2020, 07:39:26 PM
As you can see, my copy of the game has been on many voyages. I had a lot of fun playing this game. I haven't played it in ages, mainly because I'm interested in other aspects of gaming; however, I am very glad Star Trek came along, not only to give us the television programs, books and films, but because it also provided us with a lot of great games.  :v

Looks like you had the second or third edition. I was lucky enough to be gifted the original edition way back when. I still have it and several expansions that came after. I also have some of the Nexus magazines that went with it.

I'm not sure. I checked and there is no edition number or copyright date on the rule book. The only date I found was on the back of the box, which is 1979. I purchased it in the early 80s. Maybe 81, or 82? I can't remember. That's brilliant you have an original edition. That was a great gift.  :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on September 09, 2020, 02:07:40 PM
One this day in 1513 King James IV of Scotland died at the battle of Flodden. This was a battle I had heard about, but never took the time to investigate. I know much more about James VI of Scotland than I know about James IV and from what I can gather after a wee bit of research, James IV was a good king and leader, who might have been very influential in history if he hadn't died 507 years ago.
(https://i.postimg.cc/cJhmNYN4/flodden-memorial.jpg)
Source: cc-by-sa/2.0 - © Russel Wills (http://geograph.org.uk/p/5232802)

What I learned while reading about this battle:

The bill hook, or hooked bill as I also saw it described, gave the English an advantage over the Scottish spearmen. I also learned the Scottish artillery was superior to the English and unfortunately for the Scots, poorly placed, so it didn't effectively contribute to the battle.

I found two interesting videos about the battle. The first is a good account of the battle. I never heard of Baz Battles before and it seems like a good discovery. It is only 10 minutes of your time and worth watching.

The second is a television program from 2002 called Two Men in a Trench. Two archaeologists go to different places to investigate historical events. One episode is about the battle of Flodden. In the program they explain this is the first dig for this battle site. I was surprised to learn it had not been part of a past excavation before then.

I looked for a game and I didn't find anything. I discovered someone used the advanced Armati (https://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/305448/advanced-armati) rule set for this battle and I'm guessing other miniature rules would work well. I am a bit surprised there wasn't a board game, especially of the print and play variety. Anyone know if a game for this battle exists?
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on September 09, 2020, 02:10:41 PM
Interesting. I need to check those videos out.  :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on September 09, 2020, 03:57:48 PM
I watched the Baz Battles video. It was really well done and I enjoyed it (I will probably spend more time on that channel than I should). Thanks for making me aware of the channel and the Battle of Flodden!
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on September 09, 2020, 04:02:01 PM
I've been subscribed to Baz Battles for a few years now; they do good work.  Not sure I've watched their video on Flodden, however (although I know of the battle), so I'll definitely have to check it out! 
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on September 09, 2020, 04:35:51 PM
CWC Oman's Art of War in the Sixteenth Century has a very good account of the battle, and of the campaign.
According to one chronicler, the English army had to fight a battle.  They were running out of beer.
Lord Protector Somerset knew the army would start disintegrating when the militia had to rely on water!

I know Oman's two volume Art of War in the Middle Ages is online at Google books.  The Sixteenth Century might be as well.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on September 12, 2020, 01:06:37 PM
CWC Oman's Art of War in the Sixteenth Century has a very good account of the battle, and of the campaign.
According to one chronicler, the English army had to fight a battle.  They were running out of beer.
Lord Protector Somerset knew the army would start disintegrating when the militia had to rely on water!

I know Oman's two volume Art of War in the Middle Ages is online at Google books.  The Sixteenth Century might be as well.

I can only image how worried the Earl of Surrey must have been when he realized the beer supply was running low. Tony and Neil from Two Men in a Trench also comment on how beer would have been the common drink as it wasn't safe to drink the water.

Thank you for recommending Oman's Art of War in the Sixteenth Century. In the US it is still under copyright protection, (looks like it was published in 1937) so full-text isn't available at Google Books. I've added it to my growing pile of titles to be read. Oman's book about the Middle Ages was published in 1885, so it is in the public domain. I've added that one to my list too.  :)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on September 12, 2020, 05:55:10 PM
Mike, if you do find a copy of Esposito and Eating, it is a great read...

Personally, the earlier editions by Franklin. And Prager, with the full size maps, are a lot more satisfying.

Well, I found one for about as much as a high dollar wargame would cost but I bought it anyway. It's the first edition so I don't feel too bad. Can't wait to get it!

Wow, Mike, you don't mess around! I purchased my copy 20+ years ago. It took some time to track down a copy that was in decent shape and one that didn't have pencil or pen markings in it. I think you will be very satisfied with your purchase. I turn to it frequently for the maps alone, even though the information contained in it is very useful too.


So this arrived today. An absolutely incredible looking book. It is the hardback original and in very good shape. The cover is a bit rough but the inside is very nice.

(https://www.aarcentral.com/pics3/nb3.jpg)

(https://www.aarcentral.com/pics3/nb1.jpg)

And a picture of a map that relates to my current My Own Worst Enemy battle:  8)

(https://www.aarcentral.com/pics3/nb2.jpg)

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on September 12, 2020, 06:12:44 PM
That looks great, Mike  :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on September 12, 2020, 07:29:50 PM
Wow, that arrived quickly. Excellent!  :2thumbs:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on September 12, 2020, 07:39:40 PM
Indeed. Now be more careful about what books you mention.  :D
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on September 13, 2020, 09:42:19 AM
Just one comment..  in the back are thumbnail bios of many generals.  Mostly very good, concise notes.  Remember this came out long before the massive interest in the era grew.  So most of the generals were practically u known.
Some of them are wryly hilarious.  Be sure to read Wellington and Marshal Brune.
His epitaph, "Died sneering at his assassin's marksmanship" would fit all dragoon s.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on September 21, 2020, 10:37:35 AM
On this day in 1866, Herbert George Well's was born.

(https://i.postimg.cc/nc9mgwn9/H-G-Wells-by-Beresford.png)
Source: Wikimedia Commons (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:H.G._Wells_by_Beresford.jpg) 

He is most famous for his writing. We at the Armchair Dragoons also know him as a wargamer. His book Floor Games (https://archive.org/details/floorgames00well/page/n9/mode/2up) and Little Wars (https://archive.org/details/littlewarsgamefo00welluoft/page/n7/mode/2up) stirred the imagination and entertained more than a few with their toy soldiers.

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on September 21, 2020, 10:52:59 AM
Wait, wait...  according to Warehouse 13 he was just a 'front' for all of his sister's great ideas!

You mean that wasn't a documentary series?!
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on September 21, 2020, 04:04:27 PM
Wait, wait...  according to Warehouse 13 he was just a 'front' for all of his sister's great ideas!

And she bore a most striking resemblance to Jaime Murray...
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on September 21, 2020, 04:24:34 PM
Every time the nerd comes out around here, someone gotta top it.  ;)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on September 21, 2020, 04:36:34 PM
But of course. It is Our Way.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on September 21, 2020, 05:59:44 PM
Every time the nerd comes out around here, someone gotta top it.  ;)

"Comes out"?  That implies that at some point, the nerd actually leaves.  :idiot2:  :ROFL: 




But of course. It is Our Way.

Indeed.  To do otherwise would be like failing to breathe.  It is in our blood.  8) 

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on September 22, 2020, 12:00:06 AM
Wait, wait...  according to Warehouse 13 he was just a 'front' for all of his sister's great ideas!

You mean that wasn't a documentary series?!

I had never heard of Warehouse 13 until I was looking for an image of Well's to include with my post. I was also getting images of a woman I didn't recognize. I of course stopped to investigate and learned about Jaime Murray and Warehouse 13. Totally missed this program, mainly because I don't subscribed to cable, so no Syfy network. Looks interesting.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on September 22, 2020, 06:36:07 AM
Wait, wait...  according to Warehouse 13 he was just a 'front' for all of his sister's great ideas!

You mean that wasn't a documentary series?!

I had never heard of Warehouse 13 until I was looking for an image of Well's to include with my post. I was also getting images of a woman I didn't recognize. I of course stopped to investigate and learned about Jaime Murray and Warehouse 13. Totally missed this program, mainly because I don't subscribed to cable, so no Syfy network. Looks interesting.

It was a fun show, similar in many ways to another SyFy staple, Eureka. I'm sure both are available on one or more of the streaming services such as Netflix, Hulu or Prime.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on September 22, 2020, 06:41:27 AM
I used to enjoy Warehouse 13. It was quite tongue in cheek at times, and quite funny, but a lot of the stories were good.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on September 22, 2020, 06:44:56 AM
I used to enjoy Warehouse 13. It was quite tongue in cheek at times, and quite funny, but a lot of the stories were good.

Telenovella, anyone?  ;D
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on September 22, 2020, 07:02:49 AM
It's always great when a 25-year-old usenet gag turns into a hit show 😁
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on September 22, 2020, 07:28:23 AM
I think I must have missed something............. ???
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Staggerwing on September 22, 2020, 07:46:07 AM
I think I must have missed something............. ???

The episode where Pete and Mika get zapped into a Mexican telenovella as the main characters and suddenly start speaking Spanish naturally?
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on September 22, 2020, 07:56:12 AM
I don't remember that one, but I'm not totally sure I saw all the episodes. I may have to revisit, especial since there are a couple of very cute ladies in it :-)

Genelle Williams and Allison Scagliotti
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on September 28, 2020, 09:35:20 PM
https://www.navalhistory.org/2010/09/28/flogging-outlawed-160-years-ago-today

I know this comes as a real surprise.
Still, it's time to let old habits die.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on September 29, 2020, 07:35:22 AM
..there are circumstances when I think they should bring it back..................
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on September 29, 2020, 09:29:41 AM
Ah, Bawb, you made me recall a notable flogger, Edward Pellew.
Later in his career, he was Admiral on the Indian ocean.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on September 29, 2020, 10:09:47 AM
You can't get away from the fact that some people deserve a damn good thrashing!

Kiss the gunners daughter.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on September 29, 2020, 10:53:15 AM
Thank God we've done away with flogging here at the Dragoons. We...have...done away with it....Right?  :worried:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on September 29, 2020, 10:56:43 AM
Damn it, the last part was cut off.
When Pellew was in the Indian Ocean, a violent storm broke a mast.  The drag could have rolled the ship.
Seeing this, a number of the crew broke I to the rum locker and drank themselves I to a stupor.
This an ancient nautical tradition, that is far better to drown drunk than to drown sober.
Howver, the old admiral took a boarding axe and with other crew, cut the mast away.  The next morning was a rude awakening.

Pellew had a great career and his bio is a lot of fun..
When General Burgoyne came aboard the frigate, Blonde, midshipman Pellew was skylarking on the main mast by standing on his head.
Burgoyne asked Captain Pownall if the lad wasn't out of order.
Pownall replied that he was doing his head stand on his hat, so was properly attired.

Oh, and when Pellew was made a Baron, his title was Exmouth.
What in heck is an Exmouth?
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on September 29, 2020, 11:11:29 AM
Thank God we've done away with flogging here at the Dragoons. We...have...done away with it....Right?  :worried:

 :whistle:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on September 29, 2020, 12:18:51 PM
Thank God we've done away with flogging here at the Dragoons. We...have...done away with it....Right?  :worried:

 :whistle:

while we can neither confirm nor deny the continuation of such actions here at the Dragoons, we will simply note the absence of any official memo or policy explicitly ruling any such actions either in, nor out...   as far as you know  ;)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on September 29, 2020, 01:00:16 PM
Mustn't let the cat out of the bag.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on September 29, 2020, 01:27:54 PM
^You peeked!
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on September 29, 2020, 02:06:43 PM
Mustn't let the cat out of the bag.

at the moment, it is both flogged and not flogged
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on September 29, 2020, 04:15:05 PM
LOL

Schrodingers cat 'o nine tails, or maybe not..........
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on September 29, 2020, 07:44:24 PM
So... we're not sure on the whole Flogging thing here. Great. Then why are you hitting me with that damned whip?  :notme:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on September 29, 2020, 08:43:16 PM
I wasn't aware we needed a reason.  :biggrin: 
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on September 29, 2020, 10:58:22 PM
I need one for insurance purposes. Plus.... my Wife gets suspicious when I come home with strange whip-marks on me.  ::)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on September 30, 2020, 03:18:17 AM
I thought we were using her spare, though.  ???  I could've sworn that's where we got it from... 
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: besilarius on September 30, 2020, 07:37:36 AM
Could be worse.
Remember when Brant was challenged about merciful keel haulings?
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on September 30, 2020, 08:04:19 AM
WE PADDED THE KEEL WHAT MORE WERE WE SUPPOSED TO DO?!?!
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on September 30, 2020, 11:30:49 AM
A little Cucumber Water afterward wouldn't hurt.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on September 30, 2020, 11:45:08 AM
OTD in 1955, James Dean died in a car accident in Cholame, CA

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_of_James_Dean

Of note, the tree is still there
https://goo.gl/maps/yAdcdn3vkKDomebd7
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on September 30, 2020, 11:50:30 AM
OTD in 1955, James Dean died in a car accident in Cholame, CA

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_of_James_Dean

Of note, the tree is still there
https://goo.gl/maps/yAdcdn3vkKDomebd7

You may find this video interesting as well:



The guy does some very interesting videos.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on September 30, 2020, 11:56:30 AM
I've actually driven through there a bunch of times.  The next town to the west down CA-46 is Paso Robles and I lived there in '95 while waiting for on-post housing in Monterey to open up.  I also used to us CA-46 to get btw the 101 and CA 99 going btw Salinas and Ft Irwin.  That whole area was my stomping grounds in the late 90s after I was out of college.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on October 01, 2020, 10:31:10 AM
On this day in 1947, the first flight of the XP-86 Sabre prototype took place. This jet would become famous as the F-86 Sabre (and all its variants), during the Korean war. According to the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force, F-86 pilots shot down 792 MiGs by wars end.

(https://i.postimg.cc/ZRSDzVSy/640px-North-American-XP-86-Sabre-c1947.jpg)
Source: National Museum of the U.S. Air Force (https://web.archive.org/web/20131106025810/https://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/shared/media/photodb/photos/060829-F-1234S-014.jpg) Archived from an older version of their site via Internet Archive.

Here's a fact sheet about the Sabre (https://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/Visit/Museum-Exhibits/Fact-Sheets/Display/Article/196118/north-american-f-86a-sabre/) from the National Museum of the US Air Force. At the bottom of the web page there is a "Find Out More" section. From there you can find a link to get a 360 degree view from the inside of an F-86A cockkpit (http://www.nmusafvirtualtour.com/cockpits/KW_tour/KW-6.html). Very cool!

I really like this jet. Ever since I was a kid I thought it was an amazing aircraft. I checked and there are many games which include the F-86 Sabre. The two that caught my eye are:

Clash of Sabres: Tabletop Wargaming Rules for Aerial Combat 1948-1970 (1998) (https://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/307991/clash-sabres-tabletop-wargaming-rules-aerial-combaial)

MiG Alley: Air War Over Korea 1951 (2015) (https://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/187199/mig-alley-air-war-over-korea-1951)
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on October 01, 2020, 12:05:46 PM
Nice Pic! Isn't she a beauty? Even in black & white.  :applause:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on October 01, 2020, 03:34:54 PM
Nice Pic! Isn't she a beauty? Even in black & white.  :applause:

It is indeed. One of my favorite stories about the Sabre is from Chuck Yeager. In the book Yeager, there is a great story about the first MiG the US got when a North Korean pilot defected. Yeager was tasked with testing it out and pushing it to its limits. Near the end of this trail period is when the story begins. This is from page 208 of the 1985 copy of Yeager, published by Bantam Books:

(https://i.postimg.cc/MZtzgtHf/pg208-yeager.png)

Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Martok on October 01, 2020, 07:17:56 PM
Good story.  There was a reason that man was a legend.  :bigthumb: 
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: judgedredd on October 02, 2020, 03:31:46 AM
Nice!  :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on October 03, 2020, 09:46:08 AM
On this day in 1935 Mussolini's Italian army invades Abyssinia, known today as Ethiopia. The Italians invaded from Eritrea and Somaliland. The Italians greatly outnumbered and out gunned the Ethiopians. After six months of tenacious fighting withdrawal actions by the Ethiopians, they were finally defeated at Maychew in 1936.

I looked for images in the Creative Commons or Public Domain to include in this post and the only items I could find were a couple maps that were not what I was seeking. If you take the time to search for images on this war, you can find some good pictures of Haile Selassie posing with unexploded Italian bombs.

I found two games about this war. The first, Lion of Judah: The War for Ethiopia, 1935-1941 (2017) (https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/171742/lion-judah-war-ethiopia-1935-1941) is two games in one box. You can refight the invasion of 1935-36 and you refight the campaign of the British and Ethiopians against the Italians in 1940-41.

The second, Conquest of Ethiopia: The Italian Invasion, 1935-1936 – A Panzer Grenadier Game (2015) (https://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/156597/conquest-ethiopia-italian-invasion-1935-1936-panze) is only about the invasion of 1935.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on October 03, 2020, 10:34:55 AM
Lion of Judah looks like an interesting game.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on October 03, 2020, 11:03:14 AM
I've had my eye on Lion of Judah for some time.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on October 03, 2020, 04:23:35 PM
You've had your eye on every game for some time.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: BanzaiCat on October 03, 2020, 06:01:01 PM
...your point being?
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bbmike on October 03, 2020, 06:11:23 PM
No point. Still just trying to take up mirth's slack.  :(
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bayonetbrant on October 03, 2020, 06:17:11 PM
;D
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Tolstoi on October 05, 2020, 09:42:13 AM
On this date in 1877, the Nez Perce War ended.

(https://i.postimg.cc/1tGn7w30/chief-joseph.gif)
Source: National Archives Catalog (https://catalog.archives.gov/id/523607)

While looking for information about the Nez Perce war I came across this great paragraph in the 2nd edition of the International Encyclopedia of Social Sciences. The author is Stephen A. Germic and this paragraph is from page 504:

Quote
The Nez Perce fought a brilliant running battle, complete with narrow escapes and decisive victories, against U.S. forces for several months and over 1,700 miles. In October 1877, after the Battle of the Bearpaw Mountains, they were finally surrounded and forced to surrender, a day’s march short of refuge in Canada. Joseph was the only principal Nez Perce leader to survive the hostilities, so the surrender agreement fell to him, and he responded with one of the most powerful examples of American Indian oration that we have on reliable record. The oration famously concludes: “Hear me, my chiefs. I am tired; my heart is sick and sad. From where the sun now stands I will fight no more forever” (Howard 1978, p. 330). The sun stood at 2:20 P.M. on October 5, 1877.

The book Mr. Germic quotes is: Saga of Chief Joseph by Helen A. Howard published by University of Nebraska Press in 1978.

I didn't think I would find a game about this and I am happy to discover I was wrong.

I Will Fight No More... Forever (1979) (https://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/14975/i-will-fight-no-more-forever) This game was republished, (and it appears to have been updated), in Paper Wars issue 82, from Compass Games.

Before I started searching for games to link to historical events, along with posting some of the show notes for Mentioned in Dispatches, I had never heard of Simulations Canada. They seem like a very interesting company and Stephen Newberg is an eclectic designer with at least 46 tiles to his name.
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: bob48 on October 05, 2020, 09:51:01 AM
Very interesting. Thanks for posting that  :bigthumb:
Title: Re: This Day in History
Post by: Sir Slash on October 05, 2020, 11:27:25 AM
Chief Joseph was the, "Red Napoleon". A term now probably considered racist. The Nez  Perce were also one of the first tribes to relate favorably with the U.S. As I recall they helped Lewis & Clark along their journey west.