Author Topic: Longbow versus plate  (Read 438 times)

panzerde

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on: December 24, 2019, 04:02:02 PM
This is a really fantastic video of a series of tests done to determine the ability of Agincourt-era longbows/arrows to penetrate plate armor, specifically breastplates. The experiment is done with great rigor. The results are very informative. Well worth watching.



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mirth

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Reply #1 on: December 24, 2019, 05:02:51 PM
This is outstanding. Thanks for posting it  :bigthumb:

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BanzaiCat

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Reply #2 on: May 10, 2020, 10:11:41 PM
Apropos of little, just discovered my daughter and her mom's side of the family are related to an English knight that died at Agincourt.



bob48

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Reply #3 on: May 11, 2020, 07:27:34 AM
Time to do some historical digging then.

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besilarius

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Reply #4 on: May 11, 2020, 08:28:26 AM
Hmm.  Richard III was found hiding in a car park.  Search deeply.

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panzerde

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Reply #5 on: May 11, 2020, 11:31:38 AM
Hmm.  Richard III was found hiding in a car park.  Search deeply.


Didn't really help him much, either. They still found him, dodging around behind the Minis and Peugots


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S_Trauth

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Reply #6 on: June 01, 2020, 05:48:01 PM
There is a modifier in all of this though -and that would be 14th to 15th century physiology. I think I read something that those guys back then did nothing but train on those longbows with the impact that in effected their physique.

What I am saying is that their arms appeared to have developed differently with all of this training (for example I play hockey, and after awhile because I shoot lefty - that ends up impacting everything to do with my arms- like I find it tough to now through a baseball like a baseball - because of the way things gradually worked out) - and with this I am talking like things like injuries over an extended period of time, and probably overstressing the body with what could be equated as regular repetitive bowstring pulling.

I think I read somewhere (it might even have been some of Bernard Cornwell's or maybe Conn Iggulden's notes) that people around nowadays would find it nearly impossible to pull back on an actual period build longbow as they were that long and the strings were that taut.

That should have had an impact on projectile velocity... (if true, that is ...)  I do buy the part about the bodies' development - really this was about all some of those guys in that profession were able to do back in that period.



panzerde

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Reply #7 on: June 01, 2020, 05:55:56 PM
If you watch the video, the dude doing the shooting is both using a period bow, and exhibits the physiological changes. He's trained with the bow since he was a teenager, essentially replicating what a 14th century archer would have done.


Skeletons unearthed at Towton and other battles from the Wars of the Roses show archers with the unique skeletal developments. It most definitely did happen. It was this very need to develop a longbow archer over a period of years that eventually led to the adoption of firearms in England. You could train a musketeer in a month.


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besilarius

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Reply #8 on: June 01, 2020, 09:21:12 PM
There is evidence from the Renaissance that oarsmen on galleys developed in a lopsided manner if they only pulled on one side.
If they were only on the left bank of oats, then the muscles on your left side became bigger and stronger.
If you only pulled on the starboard oarsmen, your right side became bigger and stronger.
The Venetian s recognized this and trained their oarmen to work on both sets of oarsmen.
Also, contrary to Hollywood, they did not use slaves.

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S_Trauth

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Reply #9 on: June 02, 2020, 09:23:33 AM
If you watch the video, the dude doing the shooting is both using a period bow, and exhibits the physiological changes. He's trained with the bow since he was a teenager, essentially replicating what a 14th century archer would have done.


Skeletons unearthed at Towton and other battles from the Wars of the Roses show archers with the unique skeletal developments. It most definitely did happen. It was this very need to develop a longbow archer over a period of years that eventually led to the adoption of firearms in England. You could train a musketeer in a month.

Yes, sure that sounds reasonable and it that would be right about the shot angle.  I think that I probably did sort of sort of a quick view  -so I would have missed some details -and maybe it bears watching more closely than that, because the question I have is probably the obvious one -how then did Agincourt and Crecy happen?



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Reply #10 on: June 02, 2020, 02:59:37 PM

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