Author Topic: Ships!  (Read 76910 times)

judgedredd

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Reply #1335 on: August 25, 2020, 05:08:04 AM
Quote
Royal Navy and Royal Air Force Harriers onboard SS Atlantic Conveyor on the way to the Falklands, just off Ascension Island 1982. She was sunk by a stray Exocet missile with the loss of 12 of her crew on the 28 May 1982



I didn't think they were stray - I thought they specifically targeted her because they thought she was one of the carriers.

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bob48

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Reply #1336 on: August 25, 2020, 06:31:41 AM
That was always my understanding as well.

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judgedredd

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Reply #1337 on: August 25, 2020, 05:06:57 PM
Yeah. Sheffield got hit by a stray iirc...I think another ship fired chaff (Broadsword?) and when the missiles cleared, they found and targeted Sheff.

I think

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judgedredd

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Reply #1338 on: August 25, 2020, 05:10:13 PM
Yeah. Sheffield got hit by a stray iirc...I think another ship fired chaff (Broadsword?) and when the missiles cleared, they found and targeted Sheff.

I think
Wiki says it was HMS Glasgow that fired chaff.

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bayonetbrant

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Reply #1339 on: September 25, 2020, 10:11:37 PM

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bob48

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Reply #1340 on: September 26, 2020, 06:07:04 AM
Fascinating! Thanks for posting that.  :bigthumb:

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bayonetbrant

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Reply #1341 on: October 05, 2020, 07:53:29 AM
More 'boat' than 'ship'

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bob48

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Reply #1342 on: October 05, 2020, 08:01:43 AM
Interesting! There was obviously quite a lot of riverine warfare.

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bbmike

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Reply #1343 on: October 05, 2020, 08:13:43 AM
More 'floating tank' than 'boat'.

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Sir Slash

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Reply #1344 on: October 05, 2020, 11:32:03 AM
Looks like a tank and a barge decided to have a baby together. So... a, 'Targe'? 'Bank' Is already taken.

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Reply #1345 on: October 05, 2020, 04:00:53 PM
More 'boat' than 'ship'

After some searching, it appears to be the following:
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The Soviet BK1125 boat was used between 1939 and 1945 in all European fronts, from Austria in 1945 to Stalingrad…in all rivers. This armoured ship was used like a tank in a river, in fact Bronekater (BK) means armoured ship. The ship was specially designed to carry different turrets, specially T34, T28 turrets and Dushka turrets. The normal tank factories produced the same turrets for tanks and ships.

Source: Bronekater BK 1124/BK 1125 – Armored Patrol Boats



Staggerwing

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Reply #1346 on: October 05, 2020, 10:07:44 PM
Wouldn't that thing be classified as a 'monitor'?

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bayonetbrant

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Reply #1347 on: October 28, 2020, 06:39:08 AM

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judgedredd

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Reply #1348 on: October 28, 2020, 07:20:25 AM
https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/37293/a-greek-navy-minehunting-vessel-got-sliced-in-two-by-a-container-ship
How does that happen? I mean, I get the size of a tanker and doing anything fast in it is not an option...but I'd have thought the minesweeper might have a bit more ooomph in it's speed and manoeuvrability

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besilarius

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Reply #1349 on: October 28, 2020, 09:45:23 AM
JD, I have not looked at this closely, so this is all supposition.
Most minesweepers are optimised for slow operations.  As you may imagine, speed is useless if in a minefield.  So they try to put their ship far from larger ships.
That being said, the simplest answer is the merchant did something that violated the nautical Rules of the Road, or the sweeps bridge watch screwed up.
Since most small vessels know they will lose in a collision, I'd assume it was the sweeps Captain's fault.

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