Author Topic: Ships!  (Read 34746 times)

bayonetbrant

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Reply #615 on: August 09, 2019, 12:57:25 PM

Random acts of genius and other inspirations of applied violence.


besilarius

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Reply #616 on: August 11, 2019, 11:26:49 AM

https://news.usni.org/2019/08/09/navy-reverting-ddgs-back-to-physical-throttles-after-fleet-rejects-touchscreen-controls

After the Mccain collision, it was determined that the touch screen controls were too difficult, so going back to physical throttles and controls.

However, there are always exceptions to the rule.  When Desron Twelve transited from the East Coast to the Med in August, 1972, we went across with an oiler.
On one refueling event, Manley was pulling away from the oiler and after getting about half a mile away, the refueling detail was secured and the normal watch was set up.
We had been on the port side and after pulling away, the conning officer took the ship to it's assigned screen station.  To get there, the helmsman put on a couple of degrees of right rudder.
Then, just like a movie, the ship lost electrical power.
All the lights went out, the radars, the comm gear.

On the bridge everyone was stunned as the helmsman tried to change his course correction.  The physical link showed that the rudder made no change as he turned the wheel.  With the rudder set in that way, the ship was on a slow motion, gradual turn into the oiler's course.
The oiler had a destroyer on the starboard side, and a new one was hooking up lines on the port, where we had just left.  They couldn't avoid us.
We still had steam, so we banged out six short blasts on the horn, the international signal of emergency maneuvering.  The signalmen hoisted the "Out of control" signal flag, and using a battery powered signal light informed the other ships.
After steering was told to set up the manual steering gear.  This was a difficult process.  Using a hand crank, it took something like 32 turns to adjust the massive rudder by one degree.  It took a really brawny guy to get the rudder to move.
Down in the engineering spaces, things were really spastic.  The battle lanterns automatically kicked on.  The Electrician Mates couldn't see any kind of electrical break or fault.  All they could think of was to open the generator casing and see if something had gone wrong.
Now, the engineering control room was in the forward engine room.  It had an electrical board that the watch used to monitor the output of the electrical generator, and the demand on available electricity.  The after engine room had a backup system just like the main one.
No one could figure out what was going wrong.  The elctrical power was being generated in copious amount, but it was going nowhere.  For some reason, the power wasn't leaving the engine room.  The electricians were utterly dumbfounded and were tracing power lines to look for something, anything.
And ever so slowly, Manley was moving into the path of the oiler and refueling destroyers.  The destroyers were preparing for emergency break aways, which are always a bit dicey.  Too sharp a turn on the rudder, and the wake of the oiler could pull the destroyer's stern in, and cause a collision.
The captain, who was not a good shiphandler, looked at the conning officer, Rob Crawshaw.  Rob just said, "We ate the green weanie."  They were getting ready to put out on the 1MC general announcing system, to prepare for collision.
Then, suddenly with no warning, the power came on!
The helmsman, Seaman Brush I think, twirled the wheel and screamed, "Rudder has control, sir."
After getting on station, we all wondered what had happened.
Later on the midwatch, the OOD was Elmer McDowell.  He was a no nonsense mustang who was Chief Engineer.
What had happned was that when the Refueling Detail was relieved, the electrican on the main board, took off his sound powered phone gear and hung it on a hook.  In his hurry, it slipped off the hook, and fell to the deck.  On it's way down, it snagged a toggle switch.
Flipping the switch, it routed all the electrical power from the Main control board, to the Secondary control board in the after engine room.
And, since the Secondary control was on standby, the barrel switch for electrical output was at zero.  All the electricity went to the after board, and stopped right there.

There is very little in life that is sailor proof.
Oh, and Rob Crawshaw had no recollection of making that comment.

"These things must be done delicately-- or you hurt the spell."  - The Wicked Witch of the West.
"We've got the torpedo damage temporarily shored up, the fires out and soon will have the ship back on an even keel. But I would suggest, sir, that if you have to take any more torpedoes, you take 'em on the starboard side."   Pops Healy, DCA USS Lexington.


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Reply #617 on: August 14, 2019, 12:43:32 PM
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Japanese Nakajima B5N “Kate” torpedo bombers fly over the ships of the Japanese Navy in the Truk Islands (Chuuk Islands), including Yamato



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mirth

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Reply #618 on: August 14, 2019, 01:02:43 PM
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HMS Invincible and HMS Illustrious



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mirth

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Reply #619 on: August 14, 2019, 01:04:35 PM
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The USS Franklin D. Roosevelt sails down the East River after leaving the Brooklyn Navy Yard in 1945.



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BanzaiCat

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Reply #620 on: August 14, 2019, 01:13:27 PM
^ That would make a helluva large framed pic for the office wall.



mirth

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Reply #621 on: August 14, 2019, 01:13:56 PM
 :bigthumb:

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Sir Slash

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Reply #622 on: August 14, 2019, 03:08:01 PM
Very Nice!  :applause:

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Reply #623 on: August 15, 2019, 10:23:20 AM
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Coaling day aboard the USS New York (BB-34) as she lies alongside a Jason Class Collier.



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Sir Slash

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Reply #624 on: August 15, 2019, 02:51:44 PM
This picture would cause Al Gore to actually make a face.  :o

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Staggerwing

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Reply #625 on: August 15, 2019, 07:25:24 PM
No wonder sailors were always scrubbing the decks all day long.

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mirth

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Reply #626 on: August 15, 2019, 07:30:44 PM
Dumping it directly on to the deck is an interesting method.

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mirth

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Reply #627 on: August 15, 2019, 07:33:29 PM
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USS Lexington (CV-2) in December of 1929 using her power plant to provide power to Tacoma Washington after a prolonged drought caused hydroelectric power shortages



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bbmike

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Reply #628 on: August 15, 2019, 07:51:56 PM
Dumping it directly on to the deck is an interesting method.

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Reply #629 on: August 16, 2019, 12:05:15 PM
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Lord Nelson-class pre-dreadnought battleship HMS Agamemnon.



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