Author Topic: Franchise Hockey Manager 6 - what's it like?  (Read 436 times)

judgedredd

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on: May 11, 2020, 08:42:57 AM
Anyone got it? Impressions?

Alba gu' brath


Arctic Blast

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Reply #1 on: May 15, 2020, 05:32:04 PM
Anyone got it? Impressions?

I passed on it this year. The past couple of editions were decent, but very rough around the edges. The UI is an absolute clickfest, and it just never seemed to feel intuitive, no matter how much time I put into them. From the reviews, it doesn't seem like there were many changes that would alter how I felt about past versions.



judgedredd

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Reply #2 on: May 16, 2020, 02:05:26 AM
Anyone got it? Impressions?

I passed on it this year. The past couple of editions were decent, but very rough around the edges. The UI is an absolute clickfest, and it just never seemed to feel intuitive, no matter how much time I put into them. From the reviews, it doesn't seem like there were many changes that would alter how I felt about past versions.
Thanks AB. I picked it up anyway because I haven't had an edition since FHM2 and it was on offer.

I don't know a whole lot about hockey...but I was in the same boat with baseball but grew to love (and mostly understand baseball) OOTP.

Alba gu' brath


Arctic Blast

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Reply #3 on: May 20, 2020, 11:25:31 PM
Anyone got it? Impressions?

I passed on it this year. The past couple of editions were decent, but very rough around the edges. The UI is an absolute clickfest, and it just never seemed to feel intuitive, no matter how much time I put into them. From the reviews, it doesn't seem like there were many changes that would alter how I felt about past versions.
Thanks AB. I picked it up anyway because I haven't had an edition since FHM2 and it was on offer.

I don't know a whole lot about hockey...but I was in the same boat with baseball but grew to love (and mostly understand baseball) OOTP.

A bunch of dudes hit each other and occasionally put a black disc into the other team's goal.  And there's a lot of beer. That about covers it.  ;D



judgedredd

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Reply #4 on: May 21, 2020, 12:21:33 AM
Well it's mostly positions - though that kind of thing gets picked up fast - and rules. The rules take forever. For example, pretty much everytime I start to play OOTP, I'm stopped in my tracks at 2 stages - draft and "replacements".

For example, during the draft, I muddle through and seem to end up with too many players. Second, I can never seem to get a hang of when players are "ill" and go on the long term sick. Bringing another player in and then trying to remove him to get the big fella back...

Normally I get part way through a season and stop...then I get the new version and start all over again - generally hitting the same brick walls

Alba gu' brath


Arctic Blast

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Reply #5 on: May 21, 2020, 07:52:44 PM
Well it's mostly positions - though that kind of thing gets picked up fast - and rules. The rules take forever. For example, pretty much everytime I start to play OOTP, I'm stopped in my tracks at 2 stages - draft and "replacements".

For example, during the draft, I muddle through and seem to end up with too many players. Second, I can never seem to get a hang of when players are "ill" and go on the long term sick. Bringing another player in and then trying to remove him to get the big fella back...

Normally I get part way through a season and stop...then I get the new version and start all over again - generally hitting the same brick walls

Let's cover a few things for roster/contract rules :

There is a salary cap, as well as a total contracts cap. No team can have more than 50 players under contract throughout their organization, which includes those you have under contract and playing in the minor leagues (which are similar to those in baseball, there are just fewer of them. Your AHL team is like your AAA team in baseball. Your ECHL team is a bit different in that several pro clubs might share an ECHL team). A lot of draft picks spend a couple of years still playing in junior hockey, the NCAA or European leagues before they're signed to an NHL/AHL deal to keep them from counting against that contract limit (though high draft picks typically get signed right away).

High draft picks carry a lot more immediate value in hockey than they do in baseball. A first round pick might be playing in the NHL a year or two after he's drafted, which is extremely rare in baseball. An absolute star prospect can make an NHL lineup right after being drafted.

Anyone can be sent to the minors unless they have a No Movement Clause in their contract (though they can be asked to waive it). Also, if they have a certain amount of experience and they are sent down, they need to clear waivers. This is based on years since being drafted and games played since being drafted, but the numbers differ depending on how old he was when he was drafted. Any team can put a claim in on a player that's put on waivers, but his contract is immediately put onto his new team's salary cap. A No Trade Clause, on the other hand, simple means a player cannot be traded. Again, he can be asked to waive that clause.

A team cannot have more than 90 players total in their system. That includes those not signed to contracts, but who you did draft, regardless of where they're playing. A team retains rights to a draftee for 2 years after he was drafted (or until his NCAA/Junior eligibility is over), after which you either have to relinquish his rights (making him an unrestricted free agent) or sign him to a contract. The longest contract a player can sign is 7 years, unless you're re-signing your own player, in which case it's 8 years.

If you call a player up, he has to have a pro contract. So you can't bring up a Junior player who hasn't signed with you.

There is a 23 man roster limit at the NHL level, and only 20 of those players can be active for a game (12 forward, 6 defensemen, 2 goalies). Typically, the 3 inactive spots will be used for 2 forwards and 1 defenseman who act as reserves in case of an injury.

A player can be placed on Injured Reserve, which opens up a roster spot for someone else to be brought in or called up. However, once a player is put on IR, he can't be taken off of it for at least 1 week. And there has to be an open spot for him to be removed from the IR list, usually meaning someone else gets sent down to the minors or moved.

There are Restricted and Unrestricted free agents. Unrestricted free agents are completely free to sign anywhere they want, and are generally players who are 27 or older or who have 7+ years of pro experience when their contract is up. Restricted free agents can be signed to a qualifying offer,  which is a one year contract.How expensive that offer must be is determined by their level of experience and previous contract value. At a certain experience level, the offer must be a One Way contract, which means if he doesn't play in the NHL, he has to clear waivers whenever he's sent down to the minor leagues or called back up. If an offer isn't made by June 25th, that player is now an unrestricted free agent.

There are also Two way contracts, which have two different cash values depending on whether the player is in the NHL or the minor leagues. As well, you can sign veteran free agents to minor league deals, usually to put some depth and experience on your minor league rosters.

Under certain conditions, players with expiring contracts are arbitration eligible. He can still be signed to a contract as usual, but if he isn't signed by a certain amount, an independent arbitrator comes up with a contract number for a 1 year deal. The team and player both submit a bid, and the arbitrator chooses. The team has 48 hours to walk away from it if they want, but that immediately makes that player an unrestricted free agent.

Contract buy-outs do not result in 100% of the player's contract being removed from the salary cap. A portion of the salary remaining on their deal will remain on the cap (1/3 of their salary if the player is under 26, 2/3 of it if they're over) for double the number of years that deal had remaining. An example : you release a 28 year old forward with a $3 million annual salary and 2 years left on his deal. For the next 4 years, he will count as a $1 million expense on your salary cap : his remaining salary was $6 million total for 2 years,and you pay 2/3 of that ($4 million) for twice the number of years remaining (4 in this case). If that player had signing bonus money remaining, ALL of that is still paid in full for the years it was due. Also, if you release a player who signed his contract once he was 35 or older, 100% of that contract is still a salary cap hit. DON'T SIGN OLD GUYS LONG TERM.  :)

That should cover the basics. Lemme know if you have more questions.  :)




judgedredd

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Reply #6 on: May 22, 2020, 10:53:27 AM
Cracking info - thanks and bookmarked for when I get dizzy

Alba gu' brath