Author Topic: This Day in History  (Read 44834 times)

besilarius

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Reply #570 on: September 05, 2020, 02:16:10 PM
Also, Graves' subordinate was Admiral Hood, who had some kind of dispute with him.
One account stated that Graves' put up an order which ensured the rear squadron, under Hood, would not be able to support Graves' ships in the lead.
Instead of piling on sail to engage the enemy, Hood followed his order and left the leading ships to fight alone.

One of the reasons Nelson was lauded and was successful was his willingness to go off script.

"These things must be done delicately-- or you hurt the spell."  - The Wicked Witch of the West.
"We've got the torpedo damage temporarily shored up, the fires out and soon will have the ship back on an even keel. But I would suggest, sir, that if you have to take any more torpedoes, you take 'em on the starboard side."   Pops Healy, DCA USS Lexington.


Tolstoi

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Reply #571 on: September 06, 2020, 11:22:44 AM
Also, Graves' subordinate was Admiral Hood, who had some kind of dispute with him.
One account stated that Graves' put up an order which ensured the rear squadron, under Hood, would not be able to support Graves' ships in the lead.
Instead of piling on sail to engage the enemy, Hood followed his order and left the leading ships to fight alone.

One of the reasons Nelson was lauded and was successful was his willingness to go off script.

Interesting. That would help explain what happened. After reading about the Battle of Virginia Capes I definitely want to dig into this a bit more to get a better understanding of what transpired.



Tolstoi

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Reply #572 on: September 06, 2020, 11:49:44 AM
On this day in 1914 the 1st Battle of the Marne began. It started on the 6th and end on the 12th of September. Instead of posting an image about it, I decided to link to the BBC's 1964 documentary about WW I called the Great War. The documentary doesn't spend much time on this battle. To get the complete picture, you'll need to watch the last 3 minutes of the 4th episode. I couldn't get the embedded youtube function to started at the right place, but this link will take you to the correct start time.

Then watch the first 6 and a half minutes of the 5th episode here:


I like the Great War documentary. The firsthand accounts of the soldiers who were there, from both sides of the war is amazing. If you haven't watched it, I recommend you make the time to view it.

There are a lot of games about this battle. While looking for some for this post, I discovered a game about the taxis which sent French troops to the front during this battle. This is not a war game, but a co-operative game about this event in the battle: Les taxis de la Marne It definitely looks like fun.  :)



Tolstoi

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Reply #573 on: September 07, 2020, 11:35:10 AM
This one is for Cyrano.

On this day in 1812, the Battle of Borodino took place. What can I saw about this battle that you all don't already know? Probably nothing. I'll leave you with an image from the Borodino Panorama in Moscow. If you are not familiar with this panorama, you can learn about it here: Borodino Panorama


Source: Wikimedia Commons

Cyrano commemorated the battle of the Shevardino Redoubt with his son over the weekend playing Commands and Colors: Napoleonics. You can watch it here:

Cyrano and the ACD crew commemorated the Battle of Borodino here:

There are a lot of games depicting this battle. The one I recommend is Eagles of the Empire: Borodino published by Games USA. It is an area movement game. I really like this system. It never caught on, which is a real shame.  :(



Sir Slash

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Reply #574 on: September 07, 2020, 03:39:10 PM
I played the battle way back in the 80's with SSI's Battles of Napoleon on my Amiga. I got my butt handed to me by the Russkies. Tip, charging fortifications with cavalry NEVER works.  :notme:

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besilarius

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Reply #575 on: September 07, 2020, 05:18:29 PM
When Marshal Enterprises brought out their first game,Battaille de la Moscowa, one guy picked it right up.
There were no limits on using g the Imperial Guard.  We found releasing the Young Guard to support Poniatowski and clear the Utitza woods was a game winner.
Not realistic for Napoleon to use the Guard so early in any battle, but made for a great experience.

"These things must be done delicately-- or you hurt the spell."  - The Wicked Witch of the West.
"We've got the torpedo damage temporarily shored up, the fires out and soon will have the ship back on an even keel. But I would suggest, sir, that if you have to take any more torpedoes, you take 'em on the starboard side."   Pops Healy, DCA USS Lexington.


Sir Slash

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Reply #576 on: September 07, 2020, 10:51:02 PM
Didn't Marshal Davout favor moving around that flank instead of going up the middle?

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Tolstoi

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Reply #577 on: September 08, 2020, 12:05:16 AM
Didn't Marshal Davout favor moving around that flank instead of going up the middle?

Yes. According to Esposito & Elting, in their A Military History and Atlas of the Napoleonic Wars on page 116, Davout wasn't in favor of Napoleon's plan and wanted to flank the Russian left with his corps. Poniatowski would have supported Davout's right flank in this attack. Esposito & Elting think this would have worked and speculate Napoleon didn't accept this plan because it would have caused Kutusov to rapidly retreat.



bbmike

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Reply #578 on: September 08, 2020, 09:08:45 AM
Quote
According to Esposito & Elting, in their A Military History and Atlas of the Napoleonic Wars...

I'm thinking that this is a book I need to own.

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Tolstoi

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Reply #579 on: September 08, 2020, 10:47:05 AM
I've been picking events in history that are interesting to me and have a game, or a book, about the battle, or the theater of operations in which the battle took place. Today is going to be a wee bit different...

On this day in 1966, the first episode of Star Trek premiered with the story, "The Man Trap" on NBC. You all know the history behind Star Trek and the abundance of stories, programs, films, books and games that are either about the Star Trek universe, or which were inspired by it. There are many games from the Star Trek universe and I'd like to highlight the one from 1979 which was one of my first forays into this hobby we all love: Star Fleet Battles.

SFB wasn't the first wargame I played. It was one of the first wargames I purchased as as a young lad. Here's a pic of my copy:


As you can see, my copy of the game has been on many voyages. I had a lot of fun playing this game. I haven't played it in ages, mainly because I'm interested in other aspects of gaming; however, I am very glad Star Trek came along, not only to give us the television programs, books and films, but because it also provided us with a lot of great games.  :v



besilarius

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Reply #580 on: September 08, 2020, 11:35:26 AM
Mike, if you do find a copy of Esposito and Eating, it is a great read.
There are at least two editions.  The first was oversized and hard covered.  Really let the maps shine.  This one came in the 60s and I think the imprint was B Franklin.
It was reprinted by Prager maybe fifteen years later and is virtually the same.
A later print kept the maps and I think the text was updated.  Not sure of this.
However, the size was reduced so the maps are tinier and names harder to read.
These have soft covers, so you can clearly recognize which version.
Personally, the earlier editions by Franklin. And Prager, with the full size maps, are a lot more satisfying.

"These things must be done delicately-- or you hurt the spell."  - The Wicked Witch of the West.
"We've got the torpedo damage temporarily shored up, the fires out and soon will have the ship back on an even keel. But I would suggest, sir, that if you have to take any more torpedoes, you take 'em on the starboard side."   Pops Healy, DCA USS Lexington.


bbmike

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Reply #581 on: September 08, 2020, 05:29:06 PM
Mike, if you do find a copy of Esposito and Eating, it is a great read.
There are at least two editions.  The first was oversized and hard covered.  Really let the maps shine.  This one came in the 60s and I think the imprint was B Franklin.
It was reprinted by Prager maybe fifteen years later and is virtually the same.
A later print kept the maps and I think the text was updated.  Not sure of this.
However, the size was reduced so the maps are tinier and names harder to read.
These have soft covers, so you can clearly recognize which version.
Personally, the earlier editions by Franklin. And Prager, with the full size maps, are a lot more satisfying.

Well, I found one for about as much as a high dollar wargame would cost but I bought it anyway. It's the first edition so I don't feel too bad. Can't wait to get it!

"My life is spent in one long effort to escape from the commonplace of existence."
-Sherlock Holmes

"Retreat, hell! We're not retreating, we're just advancing in a different direction."
-General Oliver P. Smith


bbmike

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Reply #582 on: September 08, 2020, 05:33:14 PM
I've been picking events in history that are interesting to me and have a game, or a book, about the battle, or the theater of operations in which the battle took place. Today is going to be a wee bit different...

On this day in 1966, the first episode of Star Trek premiered with the story, "The Man Trap" on NBC. You all know the history behind Star Trek and the abundance of stories, programs, films, books and games that are either about the Star Trek universe, or which were inspired by it. There are many games from the Star Trek universe and I'd like to highlight the one from 1979 which was one of my first forays into this hobby we all love: Star Fleet Battles.

SFB wasn't the first wargame I played. It was one of the first wargames I purchased as as a young lad. Here's a pic of my copy:


As you can see, my copy of the game has been on many voyages. I had a lot of fun playing this game. I haven't played it in ages, mainly because I'm interested in other aspects of gaming; however, I am very glad Star Trek came along, not only to give us the television programs, books and films, but because it also provided us with a lot of great games.  :v

Looks like you had the second or third edition. I was lucky enough to be gifted the original edition way back when. I still have it and several expansions that came after. I also have some of the Nexus magazines that went with it.


"My life is spent in one long effort to escape from the commonplace of existence."
-Sherlock Holmes

"Retreat, hell! We're not retreating, we're just advancing in a different direction."
-General Oliver P. Smith


Tolstoi

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Reply #583 on: September 08, 2020, 07:06:59 PM
Mike, if you do find a copy of Esposito and Eating, it is a great read.
There are at least two editions.  The first was oversized and hard covered.  Really let the maps shine.  This one came in the 60s and I think the imprint was B Franklin.
It was reprinted by Prager maybe fifteen years later and is virtually the same.
A later print kept the maps and I think the text was updated.  Not sure of this.
However, the size was reduced so the maps are tinier and names harder to read.
These have soft covers, so you can clearly recognize which version.
Personally, the earlier editions by Franklin. And Prager, with the full size maps, are a lot more satisfying.

I didn't know there was a second printing of this book. I have the hardcover edition and I agree, the larger size is wonderful for the maps. I have a hard time imagining this book with smaller maps. If I come across the newer edition I might be tempted to purchase it just to see if the information is updated.



Tolstoi

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Reply #584 on: September 08, 2020, 07:11:55 PM
Mike, if you do find a copy of Esposito and Eating, it is a great read...

Personally, the earlier editions by Franklin. And Prager, with the full size maps, are a lot more satisfying.

Well, I found one for about as much as a high dollar wargame would cost but I bought it anyway. It's the first edition so I don't feel too bad. Can't wait to get it!

Wow, Mike, you don't mess around! I purchased my copy 20+ years ago. It took some time to track down a copy that was in decent shape and one that didn't have pencil or pen markings in it. I think you will be very satisfied with your purchase. I turn to it frequently for the maps alone, even though the information contained in it is very useful too.