Archive For The “Historical Sites” Category

National World War 1 Museum, Part 3 of 4

Avery Abernethy, 30 January 2019

Part 3 – Uniforms

Ground troops uniforms and equipment are prominent. My photos are haphazard captures of what interested me.

We have a very nice display of the unit insignia of all US divisions and units.

us unit insignia

us unit insignia

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National World War 1 Museum, Part 2 of 4

Avery Abernethy, 29 January 2019

Part 2 – Propaganda

This was the best exhibit of WW1 era propaganda material I’ve seen.  Understandably, most of the focus was on US material.  But there were examples from other nations.  The pictures are only a fraction of the displays.

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National World War 1 Museum, Part 1 of 4

Avery Abernethy, 28 January 2019

Part 1 – Introduction

The national World War 1 Museum is located in Kansas City, Missouri.  It opened in 1926 and is the USA’s “official museum of the first world war.”  Unusual for a museum of this type, it is owned by a private foundation with support from the Kansas City park commission.  This is a private museum with some support from the city of Kansas City. Usually battlefield or military museums are run by the National Park Service, the Smithsonian, or other arm of the Federal Government.

Museum Tower

Museum Tower

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Adventures in Napoleonicisms: An Auerstedt Travelogue

by Jim Owczarski, 6 October 2018

In the Summer of 2017, I spent two wonderful weeks chasing after Napoleonic glory in what was once East Germany.  I have written at length about my experience of researching and eventually visiting Jena, but have neglected to report on what I think is both one of the most pristine and most intriguing of the Napoleonic battlefields I have have been to: Auerstedt.

In this case, however, Auerstedt is sufficiently intact to have permitted me to find each of the viewing points recommended by the book and these, in turn, inform the narrative that follows.

Telling the story briefly, in October 1806, Napoleon, stealing a march on the uxorious Fredrick William III, drove his armies into Thuringia with the intent of destroying the Prussian army before it could attack.  Wrong-footed by the rapid French advance, the Prussians began a retreat from their forward positions, intending to form a new defensive line in the vicinity of Leipzig.  The Emperor, however, did not wait and his V Corps first caught up with and routed the Prussians at Saalfeld (10 October).  Then, three days later, Napoleon himself caught up with what he assumed was the main Prussian army near Jena.  He determined to attack early on the morning of the 14th, but, in the meanwhile, sent both Marshals Bernadotte and Davout on a long flank march to the North and East to cut off the likely route of the Prussian retreat. (more…)

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