Posts Tagged “Classic Reviews”

Classic Reviews: Line of Muskets

Classic Reviews: Line of Muskets

On #TBT, we bring you the occasional classic article – an older review or analysis piece we wanted to rescue (more…)

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Classic Reviews: Starships Unlimited ~ Divided Galaxies

Classic Reviews: Starships Unlimited ~ Divided Galaxies

Michael Eckenfels, 23 April 2020

On #TBT, we bring you the occasional classic article – an older review or analysis piece we wanted to rescue (more…)

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Classic Reviews: A Distant Plain from GMT Games

Classic Reviews: A Distant Plain from GMT Games

Brant Guillory, 16 April 2020

On #TBT, we bring you the occasional classic article – an older review or analysis piece we wanted to rescue
click images to enlarge

There are several reasons why A Distant Plain can be tough to review.  That said, they are all the same reasons that make it a compelling game.  How many multiplayer wargames have you played where the players are not simply extensions of a team, but rather working at cross purposes as often as not?  How many wargames have you played with an elastic time scale?  How many wargames eschew anything resembling unit factors or quantified values?  And now take all those tweaks and roll them into a single game, and drop into an ongoing conflict whose outcomes are not yet truly determined.

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Classic Reviews: Legion

Classic Reviews: Legion

Michael Eckenfels, 27 February 2020

On #TBT, we bring you the occasional classic article – an older review or analysis piece we wanted to rescue

Classic-Legion-LegionTitle2

Gamers, wannabe Romans, countrymen…lend me your eyes. Without having had a decent Romanesque conquest game of note in a while, Legion is on the scene and, while not one of the most realistic of games, it will bring you many months of gaming enjoyment. (more…)

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Classic Reviews: Crosswind, the novel

Brant Guillory, 9 January 2020

On #TBT, we bring you the occasional classic article – an older review or analysis piece we wanted to rescue

Crosswind is Steve Rzasa’s first book about the Sark brothers, Winchell and Copernicus.  Winchell is a journalist at a small newspaper, and his brother is a pilot, in the frontier town of Perch.

The brothers stumble into an intrigue filled plot involving a larger town to their South known as Trestleway.

While Cope is the adventurous brother, alternating between stunt pilot antics in the air and ladies man smoothness on the ground, Winch is the conservative family man with a wife and children.  The brothers stumble upon the mystery when Cope flies his brother out to the wreck of another aircraft to take pictures and write a story for the newspaper. A rather unfriendly gentleman masquerading as a local rancher tries to steal a coded message that the brothers discover in the aircraft wreckage. It turns out this man is from Trestleway, and the coded message is a warning of an impending “invasion” that was being flown in by the nephew of Perch’s mayor-general.

The brothers are sent to investigate, and report back to home. Along the way, they discover a variety of intrigue, and a few interesting technical – and mystical – tricks up Trestleway’s sleeves. (more…)

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Classic Articles: Revisiting Mystara and the BECMI D&D Game

Classic Articles: Revisiting Mystara and the BECMI D&D Game

Brant Guillory, 14 November 2019

On #TBT, we bring you the occasional classic article – an older review or analysis piece we wanted to rescue

This started as a set of pics for a personal inventory of the RPG collection.  It turned into about half of the collection – this isn’t even all the TSR stuff! – but I wanted to at least get a some of the collection archived.  Once I had the pics, though, I figured it was time to share some pics and commentary on the Mystara collection.

As an aside, for folks who are really interested in Mystara, you should check out the Bruce Heard episode of the podcast we recorded at a previous site, wherein we ask about his background with Mystara, and get a few good inside stories from the glory days of TSR.

Mystara, for those that don’t know, was the expansion of the game world that was first introduced in the X1 module that accompanied the expert-level set of the original no-prefix D&D, starting around 1981.  As the rules grew from basic to expert to companion and beyond, the rules series became known as the BECMI series.

Mystara-X1

How many of us started our adventures here?

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